Recent Chat Activity (Main Lobby)
Join Chat

Loading Chat Log...

Prefer not to see ads? Become a Community Supporter.
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 53

Thread: Character ability generation methods

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Bothell
    Age
    37
    Posts
    678
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Character ability generation methods

    Prefer not to see ads?
    Become a Community Supporter.
    What methods do you use to generate the ability scores for your players? Point buy? Rolling?

    Here is my method:
    Players can choose to roll however many dice they want to for each ability score, as long as the total dice rolled is not above 24. For each score, only the highest 3 dice are used. They then assign the 6 generated ability scores to whichever stat they'd like.

    I like this method, as it allows the player a choice to have an all around decent character (4 dice per ability score) or focus on a couple powerful abilities.

    For an example of the latter, the player could choose to use 6 dice for one score because they really want a good strength ability. They could choose to roll 4 dice for three other abilites, and 3 dice for the last two.

    After the scores are rolled, I look over them. My philosophy is that each character should have one good ability score and one poor ability score (for more interesting roleplaying), so if the character does not have a high or low stat I will change some of the scores as I need to.

    Developer for Darkage Warlord, a Pen & Paper Games exclusive Medieval Wargame.

    If you are in the DC metro area and like to trade D&D minis (1.0 or 2.0), please send me a PM!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Thornton
    Posts
    595
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    I use point-buy now. It cuts down on the rolling stats forever, and some players mysteriously always having at least one 18, if not more.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Bothell
    Age
    37
    Posts
    678
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Yeah, point buy is more fair, but I just can't get away from rolling stats since that's always been a part of a game. There's just something about starting fresh with a new character and picking up those dice.

    Developer for Darkage Warlord, a Pen & Paper Games exclusive Medieval Wargame.

    If you are in the DC metro area and like to trade D&D minis (1.0 or 2.0), please send me a PM!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Maptool
    Age
    41
    Posts
    145
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    I use a 28 point-buy.

    By my calculations the "4d6 best three" method works out (on average) to about 32 points. But using that for a point buy gets better than usual characters due to the ability to Min/Max. 28 points puts them about where I want them.

    Unless I'm doing a gestalt munchkinfest, then it's 35 points.
    Contact me via PM -- email from this site isn't working for me.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Fairfax
    Age
    34
    Posts
    605
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Riftwalker thinks: Point-buy is better when the player has a character idea already in mind. Dice rolling or other randomness injected into the process is better/more interesting when the player doesn't, or is seeing how that turns out before finalizing the character concept.

    I can't imagine using dice while rolling up a character because I usually have an idea for what I want the character to be before numbers really enter into it. That said, rolling stats probably produces more interesting characters.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Maptool
    Age
    41
    Posts
    145
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Alternate point buy method (opinions wanted)

    About the point buy...

    I was considering doing the following the next time I start a campaign:
    • You start with a 16, 21, or 26 point buy, for low, medium, or high power games, respectively.
    • You do not get a stat bump every 4th level.
    • You do get a "point buy point" every level.
    • The point buy chart gets expanded in a logical manner to buy stats higher than 18, but you can only pass 18 with the points from leveling, not character generation.
    • Your racial adjustments and inherent bonuses take you past the usual starting caps, and don't ever count for calculating how much it costs to bump a stat.
    Does this sound reasonable? Abusable? Overpowered?

    The way I see it, first level characters start off with less than impressive stats, and then grow quickly as they level up. It makes it a little harder to get very high stats, (you fall behind the normal method when you try to buy over 20) but easier to make sure none of your stats really stink. I think this makes it easier on the Stat-Madness classes like paladin, rogue, and most mutli-class builds.

    Opinions?
    Contact me via PM -- email from this site isn't working for me.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Fairfax
    Age
    34
    Posts
    605
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    It seems like it makes low-level play more challenging, though eventually (after a few levels) the system could catch up to the normal one. I've always thought that low-level characters are already pretty wimpy and if anything, could use something to make them *more* powerful rather than less powerful, though that may just be personal taste.

    As you say, it certainly does penalize characters that emphasize one or two exceptional stats when compared to those that require many stats. I wonder if the party dynamic would change a bit, or if the difference would be in the noise of usual character differences.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Fort Worth
    Posts
    119
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    The DM I play with atm does this for stats:
    • 1 FREE 18 at character Generation
    • 4d6, keep best 3 dice
    • no dolled stat can be less than 10, re-roll a nything 9 and below
    Basicaly lets you get at least 1 important stat to really great levels early, possibility of more, plus it keeps inherently -mods to start.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    1,288
    Blog Entries
    11
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    32 pt buy

    I also give max (HP+CON Mod)x2 at 1st level and 1/2+1+CON Mod each additional
    Playing: Pathfinder
    Running: infrequent VtM game


    "I'm beautifully hideous!" - Sven the Nosferatu

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Maptool
    Age
    41
    Posts
    145
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by MortonStromgal View Post
    32 pt buy

    I also give max (HP+CON Mod)x2 at 1st level and 1/2+1+CON Mod each additional
    Ah, right -- thats another one I picked up from convention play --- static HP.

    First time I've seen double HP at first level. Not a bad idea.
    I have seen everyone get a "bonus feat" of X number of extra HP.
    Contact me via PM -- email from this site isn't working for me.


  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Green Bay
    Posts
    1,420
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Most frequently, I use the countdown method. 18,17,16,15,14,13 ; but I have also allowed all 18's for everyone. Better than anything I have ever seen anyone roll in front of me and best yet fair. The players are happy with the incredible characters, until they realize I have bumped up all the monster scores as well.


    I once allowed them to use a character generator program on the computer. Only one player actually took the first roll to make his character, while the others all re-rolled hundreds of times.

    I remember using the hardcore 3d6 method in several of the first games I played in. Hardcore = 3d6, assign them in the order rolled. I am glad to see nobody would think of using it now.

    I don't think I have even met a player who liked point buy. The last couple future games I ran I used a super heroic point buy.

    One good way to find those with the greatest power - gamer streak is to tell them to generate their abilities on their own. There is always somebody who rolled miraculously. 'Oh look, all 18's ... really!' Then when they show you their super character, you hand them a previously generated weakling to play instead and see if they walk.
    Most men lead lives of quiet desperation.


  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Green Bay
    Posts
    1,420
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by MortonStromgal View Post
    32 pt buy

    I also give max (HP+CON Mod)x2 at 1st level and 1/2+1+CON Mod each additional
    In high power games, I like to give everyone the same boost so they are survivable characters. Give everyone max and an extra 15 (or whatever) hit points at first level. That way, even the wizard with no con bonus can survive along with the super constitutioned barbarian.

    Think about it, more fair?
    Most men lead lives of quiet desperation.


  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Maptool
    Age
    41
    Posts
    145
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Riftwalker View Post
    It seems like it makes low-level play more challenging, though eventually (after a few levels) the system could catch up to the normal one. I've always thought that low-level characters are already pretty wimpy and if anything, could use something to make them *more* powerful rather than less powerful, though that may just be personal taste.
    Yeah, L1 characters are pretty fragile. Deliberately so, I think. If I want the game to start where the party is ready for a real adventure, I'd start them at third level (or higher) rather than tweak the rules to make them tougher at level 1. Personal taste, though. I can see how the level progression of first through third could be fun to play though, if you were a little tougher.
    Contact me via PM -- email from this site isn't working for me.


  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Bellevue
    Posts
    2,899
    Blog Entries
    28
    Downloads
    43
    Uploads
    3
    It really depends on the type of game I am running. If it is a particularly challenging game, like "The Damned," that I started recently, then I use:

    4d6, keep the best 3, reroll 1s ad infinitum, and assign to any ability.


    Quote Originally Posted by Shadow Dweller View Post
    No rolled stat can be less than 10, re-roll a nything 9 and below
    Mmmm.. See, I like having a character with a weakness every once in a while.
    Robert A. Howard
    Pen & Paper Games
    Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Fort Worth
    Posts
    119
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Yes, but my group has a couple VERY whinie players, and it's easier to do it this way I think for the DM. Personaly with that problem I'd just bump anything <9 to a base 10. That way you don't have the inheriant weeklings, but you also don't have the ad-infinitium rolling. :-/

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Forgotten Realms Campaign in Vancouver, BC
    By Tony Misfeldt in forum Archived Campaigns
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 11-22-2007, 12:37 AM
  2. [D&D] NEWS: Updated Character Sheets
    By PnP News Bot in forum News
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-03-2007, 01:50 AM
  3. Dungeons & Dragons Light Rules
    By ronpyatt in forum Fantasy Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-23-2006, 12:04 AM
  4. [D&D] NEWS: Game Day Character Sheets
    By PnP News Bot in forum News
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-11-2006, 12:16 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •