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What do you love and hate about your local Comic Book and Gaming Store?
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Thread: What do you love and hate about your local Comic Book and Gaming Store?

  1. #1
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    What do you love and hate about your local Comic Book and Gaming Store?

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    So my wife and I have it planned out. In April of 2015 I am opening up a Comic-Book and Gaming shop. After much soul-search and deliberation, I have determined the only job I could ever really be truly happy doing is owning my own store. The town I live in pretty good sized and there are plenty of fellow geeks in the local area - and the closest stores are over a half-hour away. The reason I'm waiting until April 2015 is two-fold. First, we will have pretty much all of our debts paid off (meaning we'll be able to live off of my wife's income until the store starts to turn a profit), and I will be off of probation in January of 2015 - which means I won't be required to work for someone else. So I'm putting together a business plan and doing research. As it turns out, my town has economic incentives for new businesses (as in, up to two years of rent and utilities free).

    What I'm wanting to know is this: what do you love about your local store, and what do you hate. What products do you think are absolutely necessary, and what do you think is superfluous? What I am planning on carrying are: Marvel and DC comics (mostly the main titles unless I have someone request other titles), a small selection of Manga, HERO games products, Pathfinder and DnD 4e books (I don't have to like 4e to sell it), Magic the Gathering (both boosters & decks, and singles), Pokemon and Yugioh (booster and decks only, maybe singles for Yugioh if its still popular enough), Miniatures (primarily HeroClix and Reaper, although I'm open to sugguestions), dice, and Game Mastery products. Maybe Gaming Paper. Maybe.

    One of the services I am planning on offering is Loyalty Points Rewards and Hidden Treasure. Loyalty Points Rewards is a system I can track through a spreadsheet. Customers provide me with their names and DOB to keep track of their accounts. Data will be backed up on flashdrive and on the cloud. Loyalty points can be redeemed for a $0.25 discount off of customer's next purchase. Loyalty points are earned for every $10 spent in my shop. There will be monthly promotions where customers can redeem multiple Loyalty Points for Comic-Books, Booster Packs, or Miniatures. Hidden Treasure: any product over $20 in value (namely gaming books) will have a card on the inside with a picture of a treasure chest and a number written on it. Those numbers will match a hidden sheet with a list of rewards (extra Loyalty Points, free boosters, etc). Promotions: For certain events (Free Comic Book Day, Halloween, movie release nights) I will have a promotion that anyone who makes a purchase while in costume gets double loyalty points. Also, anyone who makes a purchase on their birthday (or the business day before or after if it happens on a day I'm closed) gets double loyalty points. Any thoughts?

  2. #2
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    Do your research.

    Are there enough comic-lovers to support having dead-tree inventory not just sitting around the store? Almost all of the local gaming stores in my area (south-west) have dropped comic books, except for the one comic and graphic novel only store.

    How many gamers of which stripes are there in your local areas?
    -Wargamers? Better have lots of space, gaming tables, maybe even some store landscapes and buildings.
    -RPGers? Then you'll want to have private rooms as well as tables. Collect old copies of game systems. And host the Free RPG Day and various company events like WotC and Pathfinder events.
    -CCGers? Again, space, tables, maybe private rooms, and be willing to organize official tournaments as well as buy, sell, and trade.
    -Board & Card? Space, tables, and in-store sets that people can try before they buy, or simply hang and play. Not only the classics like chess, checkers, shogi, go, and so on, but also stuff they can buy in store. Make sure any staff are trained on how to play. (ah, gee, darn, have to play some games during store meetings!)

    Does your distributors limit what you can get a hold of?

    Make sure you tap into any local MIBs from SJGames, they are usually willing to help out a lot with demos and events. (Disclosure Statement: I am a current MIB for SJGames, shameless promotional statement. ^^)

    Give a thought to security: while most gamers are pretty level, there are those who will slide out of the store with product. Check your local laws for how it can be handled and what kinds of security systems are allowed, and figure out how you will handle bags, backpacks, and gear. Cameras? Posting signs warning that shoplifters caught on camera will be identified publicly on youtube seems to be pretty effective - but only if your camera system is good, your storage system is capable, and if your local laws allow it.



    Things that are loved:
    - FOOD! One local game store set up a GF's grill and takes orders for sandwiches, literally hot off the grill. AWESOME. But takes food and hygiene supplies, plus storage and cold storage... not to mention checking your local laws to see if that is licensed differently. Caffeine and sugar are popular as well.
    - Themed events: always fun, and can draw the more niche customers to your store. I know one local store at least that is having a "thulu" themed event for halloween.
    - Clean air. Some of us are allergic to smoke and other "fragrances".
    - Ambiance that works with good lighting.
    - Related merchandise. T-shirts, dice stuff, jewelry (dice and otherwise), bumper-stickers, anything gaming themed goes over well.


    There is a loyalty program that one store uses, really handy, they handle all the tracking, issue coupons and specials via mail and email, very little for the store to keep track of. Might be worth looking into for you. http://www.royaltyrewards.com/
    They have a once-a-year "use all your old coupons week" which is popular, plus they offer occasional surprises. The birthday idea is great, might want to include Christmas in that.


    so that's my thoughts off the top of my head.
    nijineko the gm: AG16, CoS. nijineko the player: AtG, RttToH; . The Journal of Tala'elowar Kiyiik! .
    CrystalBallLite: the best dice roller on the planet! . nijineko the archivist: the 3.x archive

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by nijineko View Post
    Do your research.

    Are there enough comic-lovers to support having dead-tree inventory not just sitting around the store? Almost all of the local gaming stores in my area (south-west) have dropped comic books, except for the one comic and graphic novel only store.
    I know enough people in the area to justify having comic books and manga, though really I only plan on having a few titles.

    How many gamers of which stripes are there in your local areas?
    -Wargamers? Better have lots of space, gaming tables, maybe even some store landscapes and buildings.
    Some. Most do HeroClix. I don't know of many who do Warhammer or 40k, though I would be willing to order stuff and host games.
    -RPGers? Then you'll want to have private rooms as well as tables. Collect old copies of game systems. And host the Free RPG Day and various company events like WotC and Pathfinder events.
    These would be my primary target customer base. I already have plans on hosting events to demonstrate HERO system, Pathfinder, and Dungeons and Dragons.
    -CCGers? Again, space, tables, maybe private rooms, and be willing to organize official tournaments as well as buy, sell, and trade.
    These would be my secondary target customer base. I'm already planning on hosting Friday Night Magic and YuGiOh Tournements on Saturday mornings.

    -Board & Card? Space, tables, and in-store sets that people can try before they buy, or simply hang and play. Not only the classics like chess, checkers, shogi, go, and so on, but also stuff they can buy in store. Make sure any staff are trained on how to play. (ah, gee, darn, have to play some games during store meetings!)
    Limited selection. Depends on what people ask for and what they are interested in. While I do plan on selling some Indie games, it will be what I think my customers would be interested in. Plus, I plan on making it known that if they are interested in a game or product and I don't carry it, I would be more than happy to order it. I plan on having pull boxes in the back for frequent customers (they would have their own box) and keep some set aside for people who only occasionally place an order.

    Does your distributors limit what you can get a hold of?
    Haven't looked at very many distributers quite yet. I've looked into PHD games.

    Make sure you tap into any local MIBs from SJGames, they are usually willing to help out a lot with demos and events. (Disclosure Statement: I am a current MIB for SJGames, shameless promotional statement. ^^)


    MIB?

    Give a thought to security: while most gamers are pretty level, there are those who will slide out of the store with product. Check your local laws for how it can be handled and what kinds of security systems are allowed, and figure out how you will handle bags, backpacks, and gear. Cameras? Posting signs warning that shoplifters caught on camera will be identified publicly on youtube seems to be pretty effective - but only if your camera system is good, your storage system is capable, and if your local laws allow it.
    I already have plans on a CCTV setup.


    Things that are loved:
    - FOOD! One local game store set up a GF's grill and takes orders for sandwiches, literally hot off the grill. AWESOME. But takes food and hygiene supplies, plus storage and cold storage... not to mention checking your local laws to see if that is licensed differently. Caffeine and sugar are popular as well.
    This would be difficult to do. Just to have a soda machine I have to have a food handlers permit ($30 a pop) for every person working for me. Local Health Department is a classic case of bureaucracy run amok
    - Themed events: always fun, and can draw the more niche customers to your store. I know one local store at least that is having a "thulu" themed event for halloween.
    I plan on running the following special events:
    1. Free Comic Book day party (CosPlay contest, artwork contests, CHAMPIONS Play Demo, bonus loyalty points for actually purchasing comic books)
    2. Halloween - Show up in costume and shop, get double loyalty points; plus a costume contest, scary-movie trivia game, host a Call of Cthulu or VtM game)
    3. Release Parties - whenever a movie or game is released, have a release party to celebrate. Events would vary.
    4. Other Events: Miniature painting contests, how-to-classes (how to paint miniatures, how make terrain for DnD/Pathfinder/CHAMPIONS, etc), host one-shot demo games to get people interested in gaming (would-be players would sign up in advance, and have a limited number of observation slots), LAN Parties, etc.
    - Clean air. Some of us are allergic to smoke and other "fragrances".
    I have a policy: If I see you smoking, I will assume you are on fire and take appropriate action.
    - Ambiance that works with good lighting.
    Mostly I'm planning on movie/videogame posters plus whatever is available in the land of geek-dom. I have a friend who has made and painted wood cut-outs from Plants vs Zombies
    - Related merchandise. T-shirts, dice stuff, jewelry (dice and otherwise), bumper-stickers, anything gaming themed goes over well.
    Oh yeah.


    There is a loyalty program that one store uses, really handy, they handle all the tracking, issue coupons and specials via mail and email, very little for the store to keep track of. Might be worth looking into for you. http://www.royaltyrewards.com/
    They have a once-a-year "use all your old coupons week" which is popular, plus they offer occasional surprises. The birthday idea is great, might want to include Christmas in that.
    I'll look into it.


    so that's my thoughts off the top of my head.
    Hey thanks for the feedback. I'm always open to opinions, especially when its obvious stuff that I've missed.

  4. #4
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    seems like you've already covered most of what i came up with. ^^ good work.

    MIB: Men In Black - the volunteer arm of Steve Jackson Games (existed prior to the movies, just fyi... =P ), local gamers who believe in supporting local stores, and put their actions where their belief is. generally they check out what SJG merchandise you have, ask how sales are going for each line (very generally, ie: good, bad, seldom sells, can't keep it on the shelf - sort of answers) can pass information and feedback up the chain direct to SJG, help run events, demo and teach SJG games, help out with SJG games at cons, etc..



    if you are really intending on TT (table-top) gamers as your main focus, then i have a few additional thoughts:

    holiday gaming: some stores get really creative with this and run holiday themed events each month. Here are some serious, whimsical, and otherwise useful holidays for your gaming consideration:


    • January: New Year's Day, Lunar New Year, Gorilla suit day, Winter themes
    • February: Groundhog's Day, New Year's Day, First Day of Spring, Valentine's Day
    • March: St. Patricks Day, Intl. Woman's Day, Pi Approximation Day, White Hearts Day (Japan), Vernal Equinox
    • April: April Fool's Day, Earth Day, First Contact Day, World Party Day, First Day of Summer
    • May: Labor Day, Mother's Day, Memorial Day, Star Wars Day, Towel Day
    • June: Grandparent's Day, Skateboarding Day, Summer Solstice
    • July: Independence day, Harry Potter Day
    • August: Days of the Dead (Japan), Friendship Day, First Day of Autumn
    • September: Intl Talk-like-a-pirate Day, Autumnal Equinox
    • October: All Hallows Eve (Halloween), Nanomonestotse (Native American), First Day of Winter, Amputee Awareness week
    • November: Thanksgiving Day, Veteran's Day, Day of the Dead (Mexico)
    • December: St. Nick's Day, Ninja Day, Monkey Day, Christmas Day, Winter solstice


    One could use TFOS or BESM for a romance themed game, plenty of undead related games for the Days of the Dead, Santa has stats in several games, Sci-fi games for First Contact Day, a number of systems support animal characters/npcs for the animal themed events, monkeys ninjas & groundhogs, oh my... Math puzzles for Pi Day, oriental based games for the Chinese New Year and Ninja Day (a round of ninjaburger or munchkin-fu anyone?), Family oriented board and card games for the various family-member days, Cyberpunk for Amputee Awareness, and so forth.

    Depending on your local demographics, you may also find interest in the holidays of China, Japan, Mexico, Spain, Germany, Poland; also the traditions of the Native Americans, Hebrew, and so forth. Always worth tapping into - plus, it can get you entry into cultural events that you might not otherwise be able to get into (with the extra exposure, increased awareness, and advertising that goes with that). Using some of the lite systems or quick start rules for various games, mini-adventures and pre-gen characters, you can introduce new people to gaming in quick 10 minute adventures.



    One thing that drives me out of the store quickest is when a gaggle of CCGer's have taken all the tables, and there are no/few rooms for RP (and they are seldom insulated for sound either), especially when it is on Friday and/or Saturday (or Sunday for those who can) which are the only days most of your adult TT'ers will be able to game. The noise level prohibits RP, no one has much time for you, and the atmosphere just isn't the same. If you really want to focus on TT as your main customer base, then it would be wise to consider how to make sure the accommodations for in-store play are always available.


    Oh, and another popular thing I've seen in one local game store is a big screen tv and a game system or three with some comfy chairs - makes for some fun in-house competitions and special contests. Also can be charged for playing at a cheap hourly rate.
    nijineko the gm: AG16, CoS. nijineko the player: AtG, RttToH; . The Journal of Tala'elowar Kiyiik! .
    CrystalBallLite: the best dice roller on the planet! . nijineko the archivist: the 3.x archive

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    Yeah one of my biggest problems is going to be keeping the TCG-ers from bothering the TT-ers with the noise level. I may have to alternate who may play what one which Fridays (Weeks one and three for TCG, two and four for TT). May have to do the same for Saturdays (Weeks one and three for TT, two and four for TCG).

    My planned store hours are going to be from 10 AM to 5 PM Tuesday through Saturday. I will allow anyone who wants to run a game during the weekdays to stay as late as 10 PM provided they allow anyone who wants to quietly observe do so. My goal in this is to provide a meeting place for people who for one reason or another cannot host at their home, and to allow those who are interested in gaming to observe a game in progress and ask questions during breaks.

    My biggest potential pitfall is that would mean I'd be pulling 14 hour days at least. Which is why my cousin will be working for me after she gets off of school to deal with the after school crowd so I can take a small break and run errands if need be.

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    How many people actually show up at a game store before school and/or work lets out during the week, anyway? (well, i've done it, so i guess i can't say much... ^^ ) Most of the local game stores around here run from noon to 10-11pm (or until people leave) so as to maximize availability for the evening and nights crowd.

    If you "close the doors" at 5pm, will that really work? Especially for the work, school, and college demographic? I think in practice, people are going to come up, rattle the doors and bang the windows until you let them in, if they see people inside or the lights on.

    hmmm, you might want to hit up local college students and pick up furniture and other stuff from around garage sales.
    nijineko the gm: AG16, CoS. nijineko the player: AtG, RttToH; . The Journal of Tala'elowar Kiyiik! .
    CrystalBallLite: the best dice roller on the planet! . nijineko the archivist: the 3.x archive

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    Quote Originally Posted by nijineko View Post
    How many people actually show up at a game store before school and/or work lets out during the week, anyway? (well, i've done it, so i guess i can't say much... ^^ ) Most of the local game stores around here run from noon to 10-11pm (or until people leave) so as to maximize availability for the evening and nights crowd.

    If you "close the doors" at 5pm, will that really work? Especially for the work, school, and college demographic? I think in practice, people are going to come up, rattle the doors and bang the windows until you let them in, if they see people inside or the lights on.
    That is a good point about most people getting off work after 5pm. However, I don't think that is going to be as much of a problem, as most of the businesses in town close at 5 PM. And the only college is a community college branch facility.

    Plus, I will be open on Saturdays.

    And in my part of the country, I have never seen a gaming store open past 5 PM.

    As for people banging on the door "after hours," I'll let them in for possibly the first year. Staying after hours is a courtesy I would be extending those who are running/playing/observing a game, and there would be a sign stating so. I might be willing to extend store hours upon request such as if Farquar called and asked my store hours, I would tell him 10 AM to 5 PM Tuesday through Saturday, but if he can't make it during those hours due to work I would be more than happy to let him in "after hours" so he could come browse. But if Farquar stands me up more than twice, I might not be so generous as my time is valuable.

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    hmmmm. you raise some good points. allow me one counter point, if you please. one key aspect of successful business is finding something(s) that the competition does not do, and then do that. if you are the only game store open after five, then you will get any and all business that might happen after then. of course, a lot depends on your exact location and circumstances... you don't want drunks from the bar wandering in, just because you are open. ^^ and late hours has different security and safety concerns, especially if your young relative is attractive. so you do what is best for you.
    nijineko the gm: AG16, CoS. nijineko the player: AtG, RttToH; . The Journal of Tala'elowar Kiyiik! .
    CrystalBallLite: the best dice roller on the planet! . nijineko the archivist: the 3.x archive

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    Quote Originally Posted by nijineko View Post
    hmmmm. you raise some good points. allow me one counter point, if you please. one key aspect of successful business is finding something(s) that the competition does not do, and then do that. if you are the only game store open after five, then you will get any and all business that might happen after then. of course, a lot depends on your exact location and circumstances... you don't want drunks from the bar wandering in, just because you are open. ^^ and late hours has different security and safety concerns, especially if your young relative is attractive. so you do what is best for you.
    There are three main shopping centers in the town where I live. One is the downtown square. Which is where all the bars are. And yeah, if she wasn't my cousin and half my age I'd have to be blind not to think she's a good looking kid.

    The other problem with that is my closest competition outside of Walmart (which sells MtG, Pokémon and Yugioh) is 30 minutes, 45 minutes, or over an hour and a half away. Which is one of the main reasons I know I'll get plenty of customers b/c they complain all the time about the distance they have to drive.

    If it weren't for the fact I have to wait until I'm off probation to start my own business, I'd have it made in the shade. And the reason I'm waiting until April of 2015 is because I'll be completely out of debt by then and we'll be able to live off of my wife's income until I can start turning a profit with the store. My client base cries because it is 18 months away.

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    sounds like you already have a strong base. any way of polling them to see what they want? set up a website or pass around the link to here? (we'd love to see them all join here and add to the gamer database. =D )
    nijineko the gm: AG16, CoS. nijineko the player: AtG, RttToH; . The Journal of Tala'elowar Kiyiik! .
    CrystalBallLite: the best dice roller on the planet! . nijineko the archivist: the 3.x archive

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    When I hit the 6 months out mark , I'm going to be distributing fliers to my friends and my wife's co-workers to "spread the word." This will be for both advertising and to give out my email address to my customer base so I can take a poll of what they would like to see me carry.

    When I finalize my location (get the lease signed for my storefront), I will pass out more fliers with "Use this flier to receive Bonus Loyalty Points" printed on the Flier (it will be one-time bonus, and only available if they don't already have a Loyalty Points Account).

    I will also use the mailing list generated from my first Flyer Campagin to announce the grand opening.

    The first Tuesday through Friday will be my "soft opening" to make everything works equipment wise, and the first Saturday will be the "Grand Opening Gala" with costume contests and such.

    I will also be announcing the new store opening here and on other message boards (if the Moderators let me). Try to get some advertising in that way.

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    can't speak for the mods, but that sort of thing, if done tastefully, hasn't been a problem to my knowledge before. be sure to send some your customers our way to sign up for the gamer database here, the more the merrier!
    nijineko the gm: AG16, CoS. nijineko the player: AtG, RttToH; . The Journal of Tala'elowar Kiyiik! .
    CrystalBallLite: the best dice roller on the planet! . nijineko the archivist: the 3.x archive

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    What do I love/hate about the local gaming store?

    HATE:
    Owner bias: "This is my favorite game/genre, so that's all I'm going to sell or let people talk about or play here." The local shop claims to be a "gaming" shop, but there is ONE D&D book (3.5, no less!!), and ALL the rest is MechWarrior and World of Warcraft. Great! Fine! But there is a grand total of ONE gaming store within 80 miles. Oh, and don't EVEN try to grab a table in back and break out a book from another game system... they will (and HAVE) toss you out post haste.

    Loss of control:
    A shop up in Boston had product book-cases downstairs in their gaming area... and I watched SO many people just grab books ($60-80 books!) and put them in their bags to walk out. When I told the manager, he said that the owner didn't believe it happens so he couldn't do anything about it.

    LOVE:
    Personal knowledge: If you're gonna open a store, have at least a passing familiarity with ALL of the games out there. You don't have to be a guru... but a comment like, "It uses a d6 system that's kinda hard for a D% user to get used to," can REALLY help!

    ORDERING:
    Yes, it's capitalized on purpose. Unless you are a multi-bazillionaire, you won't have everything on your shelves. BUT, when you don't have the 1982, second edition of "Mulligruff's Big Adventure," have an idea of where you can order it from. Yes, we KNOW it will take time to get, but at least try. I've seen shops that refused to do this - if it wasn't on the shelves, it didn't exist to them. Another shop was "slick" and ordered off Amazon - and marked stuff up a couple of bucks for handling - and EVERYONE loved them for it. They didn't advertise that it was from Amazon, but when you were there when the UPS delivery came, you knew.

    Used Book Sales:
    A great way to get customers, keep customers and make money. A shop in Boston would take books on consignment, then have a blow-out auction. They kept the money - but gave the customer store credit (1:1) for merchandise. If the store made $10 on a book, they "sold" you a book for $10 that only cost them $7.50... and they made even more money. A good deal.

    That's about it for now.

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    oh, in the vein of amazon (great idea, btw), also keep the noble knight games site in your bookmarks. they have a knack for finding old, hard-to-find and otherwise rare games.
    nijineko the gm: AG16, CoS. nijineko the player: AtG, RttToH; . The Journal of Tala'elowar Kiyiik! .
    CrystalBallLite: the best dice roller on the planet! . nijineko the archivist: the 3.x archive

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    Quote Originally Posted by Malruhn View Post
    What do I love/hate about the local gaming store?

    HATE:
    Owner bias: "This is my favorite game/genre, so that's all I'm going to sell or let people talk about or play here." The local shop claims to be a "gaming" shop, but there is ONE D&D book (3.5, no less!!), and ALL the rest is MechWarrior and World of Warcraft. Great! Fine! But there is a grand total of ONE gaming store within 80 miles. Oh, and don't EVEN try to grab a table in back and break out a book from another game system... they will (and HAVE) toss you out post haste.
    I'm pretty open minded when it comes to all of the games out there. I plan on supplying D&D 4e (even though I'm not really that fond of it myself), Pathfinder, Hero System, VtM (and the spin-offs). I understand that WotC brought 2e AD&D back. Why, I can't understand, but I'll carry at least one copy of the core books.

    Loss of control:
    A shop up in Boston had product book-cases downstairs in their gaming area... and I watched SO many people just grab books ($60-80 books!) and put them in their bags to walk out. When I told the manager, he said that the owner didn't believe it happens so he couldn't do anything about it.
    The RPG books will be kept behind the counter, and you may "check them out" (ie, peek inside) by forking over a photo ID that will then go in the Checkout Logbook. You don't get your ID back until I get my book back or you pay for it. Period. Comic books I can't really do much about as far as Shrinkage except for doing a "fast inventory" each week and a full inventory monthly, and when things don't match up, check the surveillance cameras. This is one of the areas where I have learned to put my OCD and Micromanaging tendencies to good use.

    LOVE:
    Personal knowledge: If you're gonna open a store, have at least a passing familiarity with ALL of the games out there. You don't have to be a guru... but a comment like, "It uses a d6 system that's kinda hard for a D% user to get used to," can REALLY help!
    I don't see this being a problem. I am passingly familiar with 4e DnD, VtM, Alternity, and a handful of others. I am intimately familiar with 3.5/Pathfinder and Hero System. I enjoy researching new systems, just to see what's available.

    ORDERING:
    Yes, it's capitalized on purpose. Unless you are a multi-bazillionaire, you won't have everything on your shelves. BUT, when you don't have the 1982, second edition of "Mulligruff's Big Adventure," have an idea of where you can order it from. Yes, we KNOW it will take time to get, but at least try. I've seen shops that refused to do this - if it wasn't on the shelves, it didn't exist to them. Another shop was "slick" and ordered off Amazon - and marked stuff up a couple of bucks for handling - and EVERYONE loved them for it. They didn't advertise that it was from Amazon, but when you were there when the UPS delivery came, you knew.
    Ordering stuff won't be a problem, and I'll have pull-boxes set aside for both frequent customers and those who are only one-timing it (a fixed number of each). I have accounts with Amazon, B&N, as well as Noble-Knight Games and a few others specifically dealing with gamer merch. And I plan on having the mail-order merch come to my personal address not my business address specifically.

    Used Book Sales:
    A great way to get customers, keep customers and make money. A shop in Boston would take books on consignment, then have a blow-out auction. They kept the money - but gave the customer store credit (1:1) for merchandise. If the store made $10 on a book, they "sold" you a book for $10 that only cost them $7.50... and they made even more money. A good deal.
    My plan for used books is buy-back a certain amount of used books using the following formula:

    Good condition/mint - give store-credit for half retail value, sell for 75%
    Poor Condition - store-credit for one-quarter retail value, sell for 50%
    Bad Condition - not planning on accepting books that are falling apart unless they are very high demand. Even then, I can't see myself giving store credit for them let alone reselling them.

    That's about it for now.
    If you think of anything else, please let me know!

    Quote Originally Posted by nijineko View Post
    oh, in the vein of amazon (great idea, btw), also keep the noble knight games site in your bookmarks. they have a knack for finding old, hard-to-find and otherwise rare games.
    Oh yeah I love NKG. And I'm planning on setting up an Amazon store account with Amazon prime so I can cash in on free shipping.

    As far as marking up special orders, I believe a 10% markup is more than fair (especially since special orders count towards my Loyalty Points system), but it will be based on total plus S&H, so if I don't have to pay S&H then there won't be as much of a markup.

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