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Thread: Holy Toledo! Any gaming group have an empty seat they wanna fill? (Toledo OH)

  1. #1
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    Holy Toledo! Any gaming group have an empty seat they wanna fill? (Toledo OH)

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    Holy Toledo! Any gaming group have an empty seat they wanna fill? (Toledo OH)

  2. #2
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    Ok, Since there are no roleplayers in Toledo, Does anybody want to invest time to explain how you guys play online with maptools?
    Sorry Im such a noob. Ive played post by post email but that is not fun at all.

  3. #3
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    Most of the role playing is done over Skype, while Maptools acts as the "table", where it has the miniatures, map, and capacity to do random number generation much like dice.

    Unfortunately, there's a huge disparity between the number of willing and competent DM/GM/ST's and the number of players clamoring for a game. Most games I advertise reach capacity (6 players) in a few days, and I get a few dozen requests from potential players over the next few weeks. For example, I ran a Star Wars Saga Edition game a few months back, and within 48 hours I had 7 players, and over the first month or so of play, I think I received about 50 requests from players looking for a game.

    So, getting in on a good online game is difficult, and one player even told me that it was like winning a lottery when they manage to land a seat. I recommend keeping an eye out and trying to jump in on every game that advertises.

  4. #4
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    "winning the lottery" haha great!
    Alright, thanks Simetradon.
    I really would like to DM (maybe the old greyhawk campaign (TOEE, SOTSL, QOTS) with Pathfinder) but it seems I gotta learn a whole new way of playing the game, like mastering an online tabletop.

  5. #5
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    Yeah, it's rough out there for players. I've even had to cancel one of my games, even though I had a crapload of prep work done, due to unforeseen circumstances that impacted my schedule.

    As a GM, I recommend first setting up a web page or online resource that gives detail about your campaign and any specifics and house rules. You can check out mine below, but you could also use something like Obsidian Portal.
    http://the-edge-of-starlight.blogspot.com/
    This was the Star Wars Saga Edition campaign I ran that I spoke of previously.

    http://legacy-of-shadows.blogspot.com/
    This was a Pathfinder campaign that I had to unfortunately cancel due to schedule conflicts.

    http://tales-of-the-inner-sea.blogspot.com/
    This is a Pathfinder campaign that is currently ongoing.

    http://shadows-and-chrome.blogspot.com/
    ...and finally, this is the Chaos 6010 campaign that launches this Thursday. As an employee of the publishing company that produces Chaos 6010, this is my pride and joy, and I've taken what works from previous games and incorporated into this.


    As for using Maptools, thankfully they have a number of online video tutorials on their website. The largest amount of work is learning how to program macros, and draw maps. Macros make your job infinitely easier, as you and players just need to click a button and it generates effects, dice rolls, does the calculations, and displays the results. I would say having a good set of macros cuts down your time and allows you to breeze through combat.

    Secondly, you have maps, and drawing them out. You want to make each map encompass a decent size encounter, but you don't want to "overdraw". My rule of thumb is that a map should never exceed 6 megs, or 60 objects (not including PC tokens), or else it takes forever to load on the player side of the game. Also, for dungeons, keep them smallish, or split them into multiple areas (having multiple floors works well). Before you launch a campaign, you want at least 5 maps fully drawn and ready to go. If you are going with a more "sandbox" approach, you need even more maps. For example, my Chaos 6010 campaign has 8 maps ready to go, and about half of them are "generic" and can be reused. Conversely, my Legacy of Shadows Pathfinder game only had 5 maps drawn up, but I was going to reuse a bunch of maps from my Tales of the Inner Sea Pathfinder campaign (which has 35 maps) which is still ongoing, but with an entirely different group of players.

    I limit my sessions to 4 hours, which gives just enough time to get some things done, while not long enough that players start drifting, as the compulsion to check emails or browse the internet slowly creeps up on players. This allows for about 2-3 encounters, which requires the construction of about that many maps. I tend to keep a session or two ahead of the players when I'm running a plotline. Unfortunately, certain game systems, such as Pathfinder, make it difficult to have "random encounters" to drop in. Chaos 6010, on the other hand, I can set up a "random encounter" and it remains viable as a challenge for approximately 8 levels.

    As for the "tokens", they act entirely as a miniature, a character sheet, and they have all the macros that auto-calculate any rolls involving that creature. Thus, a goblin token is set to the stats for a goblin, and I happen to reuse tokens quite often. For example, I have the artwork for approximately 75 tokens for Chaos, and approximately half of those are all set with stats and macros.

    It requires a decent amount of effort and work to get everything set for a game, and I generally work on a campaign for about a month before advertising, and give myself 1-3 weeks before actually launching the game, and for players to get their things in order (although some of them are ready to go within a matter of days).

    It might sound a bit exhausting, but it's an art, and if you're going to bother putting your name on it, you might as well make it noteworthy.

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