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Thread: Homebrew Rules. Everyone has a few. What are some of yours?

  1. #16
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    Ummmm... thelrain. It's called Total Defense, and it grants twice the bonus fighting defensively does. Fighting defensively grants +2, +3 if you have at least 5 ranks in tumble, and you double that if you take Total Defense (meaning no attack for the round)
    Masaru Academy, a roleplaying experience you'll never forget.

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    Quote Originally Posted by korhal23 View Post
    Actually, this has changed over time in Saga with new talents that have been introduced, particularly in the Jedi Training Manual. Jedi recuperate force points at a lightning quick pace with the right talents. And you can spend a force point to recover a power you've already used in combat. At low levels, sure, it kinda can seem limited for Jedi... but you have to remember that until you cross into the Jedi Knight prestige class, you're just a padawan. I mean, you don't even build your own lightsaber until level 7. And by the time you're a Jedi Knight, you have a nice suite of powers. I like how they did Force Powers in Saga... heck, I think I'd like powers in D&D 4E even better if they worked like Saga's Force Powers.
    Heh, all I have is the main book, and it's likely that'll be the extent of it. I'd rather all characters have the same access to Force Points, not just those with the right options; rewarding system mastery isn't a feature in my eyes. (Incidentally, the way 4E powers work is such an awesome change from previous editions; too bad the rest of my group feels differently :P)

    Since I'm currently prepping a one-shot for Friday, these rules are getting a closer look. Gonna be taking notes on how the power suites and Force Points get used (or even if they get used), as well as armor adding to Reflex (which seems ... counterintuitive, not to mention armor doesn't seem to be, er, all that protective in the films). It's like the rules didn't go far enough from DnD assumptions to match the source material, in some respects. What I expect from the license and what the game provides mesh well, but they do have some conflicts and that spurs me to tinker

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    The only homebrew rule (although I think its in the 3.5 DM Guide) is critical fumble. If a natural 1 is rolled, I have the player, monster, or npc roll again and unless they get a 10 - with dex modifier - then that person drops their weapon.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sascha View Post
    Heh, all I have is the main book, and it's likely that'll be the extent of it. I'd rather all characters have the same access to Force Points, not just those with the right options; rewarding system mastery isn't a feature in my eyes. (Incidentally, the way 4E powers work is such an awesome change from previous editions; too bad the rest of my group feels differently :P)

    Since I'm currently prepping a one-shot for Friday, these rules are getting a closer look. Gonna be taking notes on how the power suites and Force Points get used (or even if they get used), as well as armor adding to Reflex (which seems ... counterintuitive, not to mention armor doesn't seem to be, er, all that protective in the films). It's like the rules didn't go far enough from DnD assumptions to match the source material, in some respects. What I expect from the license and what the game provides mesh well, but they do have some conflicts and that spurs me to tinker
    Out of the core book only:

    If you want more force points, there's a feat called Force Boon, granting three more. If you want Force Points to be more effective when you spend them, there's Strong in the Force, which has you roll d8s instead of d6s. Force Training of course grants more powers into your suite. The reason you would stay as a Jedi and NOT cross into Jedi Knight is to get a few more feats, as Jedi receive extra feats every even level and Jedi Knights don't. If you want to return powers to your suite without spending Force Points, there are several Force Talents to do so, such as Telekenetic Savant, or Telekenetic Power which lets you use a power immediately again if you roll a nat20 on certain powers Use the Force check. Force Focus lets you make a Use the Force check as a standard action to return a power without spending a point, and even by level 3 most Jedi should be at the point where failing that check is less than 10%.

    Jedi Knights also receive Force Talents. One of these is to recover a force point at the end of an encounter, and can be taken multiple times, for multiple Force point returns.

    Having Destiny points in your game is another even more power addition. You gain one Destiny point per level, and if you complete your destiny and pick a new one, you gain a whole new set of Destiny points, one for each level you have attained. Destiny points have numerous effects on their own, and can greatly boost your roles and powers. They also have the power to be converted into Force Points... 1 Destiny Point = 3 Force points.

    Naturally, no one will have all of these abilities under their belt, but all Force sensitive characters will have at least some of them. This system doesn't reward system mastery, it's just obvious which way you will play your character early on... some players will have Jedi who are very force power dependent, some players will have Jedi that only have a power or three. Jedi are one of those classes where all stats are relevant to them in some manner, but every person that makes a Jedi will slant him/her one way or another. If you're playing at low levels, players may feel the need to hang on to their powers until they feel they really need them, so you may see powers not used that much. Put your players around levels 5 and beyond and you'll start seeing more powers being used.

    As for the armor question: Armor isn't that useful in the game. Armor adds to your Reflex Defense (like 4E, defenses are static numbers), however when wearing armor you must use the armor's Reflex bonus, instead of your Heroic Level. Sometimes this is a good thing, sometimes not so much. But that being said, you'll notice that there is no AC... Reflex Defense is your only defense against most physical attacks. Armor also has the benefit of boosting your Fortitude defense as well... So the tradeoff as you level is do you want to use armor to have your Fortitude defense be higher but hurt your Reflex, or take the armor off and lose the Fort bonus but gain Reflex. The only class that really has any use for armor beyond level 4 or 5 is the Soldier (or the Jensaarai, the rebel Jedi who blended Jedi teachings with Sith teachings to make their own branch, they wear armor too), because with talents they can potentially choose to use their Heroic Level for reflex if it's higher than the armor (while retaining the armor's Fort bonus), and then with another talent they can ADD their level and the armor bonus to Reflex.

    Other than that, armor's only use is if it is also an environmental suit.

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    I think you're kind of missing the point of Force Points in Saga. The Force is not a Bennie, or a mana pool in the Star Wars universe, it permeates everything. Characters who are force sensitive merely use the Force knowingly and in a controlled manner. Non-Force sensitive characters merely think they have good luck or some such thing, but they simply don't know that they're manipulating the Force too, just typically in a more subtle manner.
    I'm not saying The Force is supposed to be a bennie or a mana pool. I've always seen a distinction between a Jedi that uses "Use the Force" skill and then all characters being able to use Force Points. One is a constant manipulation of the Force - Use the Force, while the other is more akin to a quick, but powerful 'burst of adrenaline' - Force Point. With WotC, Force Points seem hohum and not very dramatic, especially with talents that require a Force Point to activate. The use of the Destiny mechanic and the spending of Destiny points has moer of the feel of a WEG Force Point...that quick, powerful 'burst of adrenaline' that feels dramatic and has a definate impact. For me, it's mainly a flavor thing.

    You don't run out of Force either, though as a balance mechanic I can see why RPGs and video games set in the Star Wars universe tend to treat the Force as a (often quickly regenerating) mana pool. Sure, it may not seem like a level 1 Jedi has that many more Force Points than a level 1 Noble (they don't) but compare, say, 10th level characters. The Jedi (who has probably crossed into Jedi Knight) now has Force Points coming out the wazoo and they regenerate quickly, while the Noble is still only going to have a few, and they won't regenerate in nearly the same way.
    Like I said, I'm not looking for the Force to be a finite 'goodad'. That's covered by the basic uses granted with the "Use the Force" skill, the Force powers suite of Saga and the variety of methods in which Force Powers in the suite can be 'returned' during an encounter. However, I do believe that 'adrenaline burst' of a Force Point is definately something that you just run out of.


    And ANY use of the Force that causes harm is Dark Side? I don't think so...Beyond that, all lightsaber fighting styles are infused with the Force, many of the combat force powers deal damage (as Saga doesn't differentiate between types of damage, some of the powers are obviously from the descriptions only talking someone down, and they still deal damage, and even stun damage also does not get counted separately)... this rule above all others hamstrings your players beyond measure in a combat scenario.
    I'm referring directly to powers such as Force Thrust, Force Slam, Force Grip, or Move Object to hurl something at someone or Hurl someone...not the use of a lightsaber. If the power specifically states that it is deals stun damage, only one or two that I'm aware of, then no darkside point awarded, but I warn the player that they are stepping a bit close to the darkside. I run Star Wars campaigns in which everything is very much 'black and white' - 'good or evil'.

    It's the emotionality behind your actions that causes the Dark Side to rise in someone. The reason why no one kills the Emperor when they had him on the ropes at the end of The Force Unleashed is that no one could kill him without hate and anger in their hearts. The reason why Vader is able to kill the Emperor at the end of RotJ is that his heart isn't filled with hate, it's filled with love and compassion for Luke. Using the Force to torture earns you a Dark Side point. Using the Force to harm innocents, the helpless, or those who are surrendering earns you a Dark Side point. Using the Force in combat, however, does not. Hothead that he is, even Anakin's fall is not due entirely to his actions in combat. Sure, he invested himself emotionally into some fights, such as versus Dooku in Ep. II, probably resulting in a Dark Side point or two. And his execution of Dooku at the beginning of Ep. III was definitely Dark Side worthy. Over time, though, Palpatine had been inflicting Dark Side upon Anakin because Anakin believed what Palpatine was saying. By the time he goes on his murder spree, he's already full Dark Side, owing very little of that to his actions in combat.
    While you make a strong case, I disagree. Your point seems to echo of the Unifying Force concept from the final book in the Yushong Vong series. That whole last book of the series is as bad as the introduction of midi-fricking-chlorians. I stick with the Light Side being a use of the Force that is in harmony with life - ie. uses that do not harm others or other life forms, while the Dark Side is a use of the Force that is out of harmony with life - ie. using the Force to harm others, either directly (as with Force Lightning, Forec Slam, Force Grip, and so forth) or indirectly (as Palpatine did by manipulating and twisting Anakin). It's a flavor thing, and one that I know not many agree with.

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    I have fairly standard house rules such as a fumble chart for rolling 1s on attacks. And then I have other house rules that I use for certain kinds of campaigns to change the feel of the game such as critical hits for games that I want a more realistic feel or more radical changes for a homebrew campaign of mine where the characters jump from time period to time period in Earth's history. In this campaign the characters are able to switch classes with no restrictions and there are many different combat rules such as different pools for body points and stamina points. I also like to tinker with the rules a bit and try different things, all with the approval of the players of course.
    "Plan?...There ain't no plan!" - Pigkiller

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    Quote Originally Posted by korhal23 View Post
    Out of the core book only: <snip>
    Yeah, but those are really what I'm having problems with - the idea that the Force works differently for folks with the right options. It is an example of system mastery, though nowhere near the extent of DnD 3.x.

    As for armor, sure it doesn't stack with level for Reflex, but the implication is that it makes one harder to hit, which goes somewhat against the grain of the source material. 'Specially with regard to lightsabers, which aren't hindered at all by armor in the films.

    Quote Originally Posted by korhal23 View Post
    I think you're kind of missing the point of Force Points in Saga. The Force is not a Bennie, or a mana pool in the Star Wars universe, it permeates everything. Characters who are force sensitive merely use the Force knowingly and in a controlled manner.
    Here again is where my expectations of the license and what the system provides conflict. I want Force points to be like Fate points, in the sense that they allow bonuses (which they do), power abilities (which they do), and allow narrative control (which they don't do); that last bit is where the need for a more fluid pool comes into play.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sascha View Post
    Yeah, but those are really what I'm having problems with - the idea that the Force works differently for folks with the right options. It is an example of system mastery, though nowhere near the extent of DnD 3.x.

    As for armor, sure it doesn't stack with level for Reflex, but the implication is that it makes one harder to hit, which goes somewhat against the grain of the source material. 'Specially with regard to lightsabers, which aren't hindered at all by armor in the films.


    Here again is where my expectations of the license and what the system provides conflict. I want Force points to be like Fate points, in the sense that they allow bonuses (which they do), power abilities (which they do), and allow narrative control (which they don't do); that last bit is where the need for a more fluid pool comes into play.
    Sure, the Force works differently for different characters based on the options you select. But you have to think about that from an in character perspective. No two Jedi are the same, nor does or SHOULD the Force work the same for any two Jedi, to the extent that even a Jedi's own Padawan learner often uses a different fighting style and has different views on the Force. Some lean heavier on Force powers, some lean heavier on their lightsaber, some aren't nearly as good of combatants... And if it doesn't work the same for any two Jedi, it sure isn't going to work the same for a non-Force user. Feat and Talent selections are merely an OOC indicator of the direction your IC training goes. I'd also advise you to pick up the Jedi Training Manual, which includes Lightsaber Manuevers as well to balance out characters that head in that direction. I think this is starting to curtail into the "Does mechanical knowledge harm RP" discussion from not that long ago, though.

    Actually, all armor has the potential to interfere with a lightsaber, and some are explicitly designed to. It all comes down to density. The thing is that most characters won't be wearing armor, except for things like flight suits if they need them. And beyond level 4 or 5 wearing armor will most likely INCREASE the odds of you getting hit. This also pertains to earlier in this thread with my mention of how Armor Class works in D&D... Mechanically, most d20 system games abstract the combat so far that they don't care whether you are missed or whether you simply aren't harmed by an attack, they just rule them all a miss. For instance, look how many times Vader gets hit in Ep. V and the blade bounces right off. Armor bonuses to reflex vs. lightsabers are merely accounting for the chance that it wasn't a good swing, or was some kind of glancing blow that maybe would've touched skin, but didn't because of the armor. Overall though, if you play your game around levels 10-15 (where I believe Saga is at it's best) you'll see a net loss to reflex due to armor for most characters.

    Perhaps a Plot Points type of pool is something you should be houseruling in, not changing Force Points. The Force affects actions, and grants powers. But to change the narrative is not the point of Force Points. If you do give them that level of power, upping the number of them for everyone, Force sensitive or not is definitely in order.

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    Quote Originally Posted by korhal23 View Post
    Actually, all armor has the potential to interfere with a lightsaber, and some are explicitly designed to. It all comes down to density...
    Actually, a lightsaber, which is as much a confined beam of energy as it is a concentrated 'vessel' for the force does ignore armor and DR. Although, if the armor is made with cortosis, mandalorian iron, or I believe treated with some kind of Sith alchemical material, then yeah, you got something that can stand up to a lightsaber. If it was simply a matter of density, the blast doors that were closed to keep Qui-gon and Obi-wan out of the control room in The Phantom Menace would have been resistant enough to keep Qui-Gon's lightsaber from sinking in and having any kind of effect at all. However, as for the three substances mentioned above, unless it's legacy era or kotor or some other sith/mandalorains are abundant era, then those substances are pretty rare...at least in the EU material I've seen.

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    Quote Originally Posted by korhal23 View Post
    Sure, the Force works differently for different characters based on the options you select. But you have to think about that from an in character perspective. No two Jedi are the same, nor does or SHOULD the Force work the same for any two Jedi, to the extent that even a Jedi's own Padawan learner often uses a different fighting style and has different views on the Force. Some lean heavier on Force powers, some lean heavier on their lightsaber, some aren't nearly as good of combatants... And if it doesn't work the same for any two Jedi, it sure isn't going to work the same for a non-Force user. Feat and Talent selections are merely an OOC indicator of the direction your IC training goes. I'd also advise you to pick up the Jedi Training Manual, which includes Lightsaber Manuevers as well to balance out characters that head in that direction. I think this is starting to curtail into the "Does mechanical knowledge harm RP" discussion from not that long ago, though.
    Except that it does work the same, using the in-universe (and in-game) explanation; non-Force users unconsciously tap into the Force when they spend the points, while Force users are aware of what they're doing. Training, outlook, and the like don't change the underlying principle that the Force is controlling actions and obeying commands. That Force users have more avenues of channeling that energy doesn't change it, either.

    (Largely, this is not so much a conflict on how the Force works, but rather how important differentiation is; I'm not terribly concerned with having variances hard-wired into lists of choices, while the designers seemed to have it explicitly as a goal. It'd be easier on me just to use FATE, but this group is somewhat allergic to non-d20-based games :\)

    Quote Originally Posted by korhal23 View Post
    Actually, all armor has the potential to interfere with a lightsaber, and some are explicitly designed to. It all comes down to density. The thing is that most characters won't be wearing armor, except for things like flight suits if they need them. And beyond level 4 or 5 wearing armor will most likely INCREASE the odds of you getting hit. This also pertains to earlier in this thread with my mention of how Armor Class works in D&D... Mechanically, most d20 system games abstract the combat so far that they don't care whether you are missed or whether you simply aren't harmed by an attack, they just rule them all a miss. For instance, look how many times Vader gets hit in Ep. V and the blade bounces right off. Armor bonuses to reflex vs. lightsabers are merely accounting for the chance that it wasn't a good swing, or was some kind of glancing blow that maybe would've touched skin, but didn't because of the armor. Overall though, if you play your game around levels 10-15 (where I believe Saga is at it's best) you'll see a net loss to reflex due to armor for most characters.
    There's already a mechanism in-game that simulates armor being protective: damage reduction. It could have been that all armor was treated in that respect; instead of making it harder to land a hit, the armor absorbs incoming damage. Since lightsabers ignore DR, there'd be no fluff v. crunch conflict. Much like what is seen in the films.

    Also, I've always taken the Vader fights not as his armor protecting him, but his ability to turn a serious wound into a lesser one, via training and the Force. In-game, that's what HP, Force powers and Force points all represent. (I'd even argue that it's not really armor, but a mobile iron lung; all the sparks we see are the electronics and his prosthetics taking hits.)

    Quote Originally Posted by korhal23 View Post
    Perhaps a Plot Points type of pool is something you should be houseruling in, not changing Force Points. The Force affects actions, and grants powers. But to change the narrative is not the point of Force Points. If you do give them that level of power, upping the number of them for everyone, Force sensitive or not is definitely in order.
    Which was the intent, yes. Giving the player the ability to influence the narrative is already in-place, what with all the other rules; they just didn't go far enough with Force points and what they represent: the influence of the Force on all (re)actions, even seemingly coincidental events. Tracking yet another pool of points (Destiny points included) is, to me, silly, when Force points are perfectly capable of fulfilling that role.

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    I have a whole game (piecemeal) and a blog that everyday discusses another rule.

    http://zzarchov.blogspot.com
    Check out my Blog! zzarchov.blogspot.com

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    To quote the Wookiepedia (all craptacular grammar transferred over unedited, italics added by me for emphasis):
    A lightsaber blade was a massless form that neither radiated heat nor expended energy until it came into contact with something solid. The power of the energy blade was so great that it could cut through almost anything, although the speed through which it cut depended on the density of the subject. One important note about lightsaber wounds is that they rarely bleed profusely, even when a limb had been severed. This is because the energy blade cauterized the wound as it passed, and thus even a severe wound did not tend to bleed heavily.
    When cutting through dense material, the immense electromagnetic field generated by the arc causes resistance rather than letting solid matter enter and interrupt the arc. This gives the blade a feeling of being solid when immersed in dense material. Rarely, some solid materials can actually pass through the electromagnetic field and short out the arc. Other Electromagnetic energy fields and coherent energy are also repelled by lightsabers' arcs. These include most force fields, blaster bolts, and other lightsaber blades.


    As for the Force User/Non-Force User thing, sure, non-Force users can tap into the Force, but not intentionally (so the fact that you as a player even decide when it happens is a bit of a stretch to me), or with nearly the same efficiency or power that a trained Force User can or should be able to. Yes, everyone CAN use the Force, but if it works the same for everyone there's not even a point to Jedi or Sith training.

    That said, no one in the Star Wars Universe would ever say "Oh sweet, I can't wait until I finish my next adventure so I can unlock Strong in the Force for myself!" No. But perhaps they spend their all of their downtime training... to jump one inch higher, to lift something one pound heavier, what have you, and thus the player selecting "Strong in the Force" is a natural progression. The problem I have with d20 is that there is no coming into new powers. One day they aren't there, the next day POOF there they are.

    It sounds to me, Sascha, like your issue is with d20 system in general. What you're looking for, things like Points that let you control narrative, just don't exist in d20 land. Force Points are logical to me in what they're capable of. For instance, say a character is level 15 and Strong in the Force. Spending ONE Force point (and by then you'd have about a dozen or so) has the potential to earn you bonus of 24 (3d8) which even at that level is phenomenal. The Force has the power to change the narrative as is, because a 24 bonus could turn even the most inevitable failure into a potential success. Beyond that, look at how many Force points Qui-Gon spent to change the destiny of the Universe for all time by causing that die to roll once more... Zero. DC10 Use the Force, with a probably +20 or so bonus. He couldn't fail if he wanted to (1s aren't autofails with skills).

    I really think you'd be best served by a game set at at least 15th level. When everyone even remotely important was at least that level in the movie, it's hard to wrap your head around how weak exactly a level 1 character is. I really think that when you put characters at the higher level, you'll see what you're after, such as the Force being able to radically alter narrative as designed.

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    I have just one, which is a system of quirks/flaws. Players pick 3 character flaws that help define the character's personality and behavior. For every one they can use to create entertainment in game I award bonus XP. This is not just "Ok I farted in public, hand me those XPs." so players are well served to come up with clever ones.

    I realized a long time ago that I tend to like games to progress a bit faster than usual but instead of just handing them extra experience I decided to give them a simple way to earn it.

    "Laugh and the world laughs with you. Weep and you weep alone."

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    Depends on the system.

    For GURPS, my houserules are extremely limited.
    For 3e, I ban the "jinx" disad, charge an "unusual advantage" to possess the over-powered "katana" skill, nix the "IQ ads to Guns skill" rule, price attributes as per 4e, fix overland travel to something more realistic, and place limitations on the psi system.
    (4e has a different set, pretty much limited to "No supernatural or exotic ads or disads without my expressed permission. Yes, I really mean it. And I'm very likely to say no.")

    When I was looking at running a 3e D&D game, though, I think they ran four pages.
    (I'll try to find the file on my other computer and post them.)
    --- Merged from Double Post ---
    Upon further review, it seems "about four pages" was quite an exaggeration. 2-1/2 pages is more accurate. Some of them (like the semi-barring of elves and druids) are for world-building considerations, but these are the minority. The file's too big to attach, so I'll cut & paste.

    House rules

    1) Commoners use the fighters BAB, but retain their documented hp. It is assumed that anybody who uses their single proficient weapon every day of their life, will be skilled enough with it to use it offensively. Defense requires more than a simple knowledge of the weapon, therefore, hp are unchanged. The permissible weapons list for commoners is expanded to include the scythe, trident, light hammer, and handax. If a character possesses levels other than commoner, the commoner BAB only stacks with regard to the commoner’s single weapon proficiency.

    2) Ambidexterity is a feat that can *only* be purchased during character creation. The "Ranger", "Paladin" and "Sorcerer" classes are special. If your character does not start with them, they can be very hard to attain.

    3) Massed fire. When employed by a coordinated group against a single target, ranged weapons are devastating. Especially against lightly armored foes that depend on agility for protection. For every ranged weapon wielder after the first, two points of AC derived from dexterity bonuses are eliminated from the target. Obviously, this component only affects those characters with dex bonuses to their AC. Further, each two ranged weapon wielders focusing on the same target will increase the critical "threat range" by one for all wielders focusing on the same target. This is cumulative. If the critical range exceeds the wielder's actual "to hit" target number range, the target number range is adjusted a like amount. This rule is restricted to foes within 1 size category of the wielders, and wielders of the same or similar weapons. Using this tactic requires all wielders to act on the same initiative phase. (This is a virtual feat automatically granted to most PC races and/or classes.)

    4) Melee. The "cannot be flanked" advantage is trumped by two plus ½ dexterity modifier attackers. (Fractions round to the defender’s advantage.) Each two melee weapon wielders focusing on the same target will increase the critical "threat range" by one for all melee weapon wielders focusing on the same target. This is cumulative. If the critical range exceeds the wielder's actual "to hit" target number range, the target number range is adjusted a like amount. These rules are limited to creatures within one size category of the target, and wielders of the same, or similar weapons. Flails, two handed slashing/bludgeoning weapons (with the exception of polearms designed for the purpose) and double weapons may not be used in these “massed” attack tactics. (This is a virtual feat automatically granted to most PC races and/or classes.) In melee combat, height differentials are very important. The “uphill” combatant receives cover ranging from 25% to 100%, depending on the severity of the grade, and the relative size and reach of the combatant’s weapons. (100% scenario: You are armed with a shortsword, and are at the bottom of an open pit. Hostile spearmen are looking down at you from all sides. It’s a good idea to try and avoid this type of situation.)

    5) In combat, changing positions (standing to prone, prone to kneeling, kneeling to standing, mounted to standing, standing to mounted, mounted to prone) is a move-equivalent action that provokes attacks of opportunity. This occurs even if the change in position was forced or unintentional. (This does not give a tripping character an extra attack. That character is busy with his action during the time of the vulnerability.) Going from prone to standing is an automatic “double-move” action, but can be reduced to a single “move equivalent” action with a successful “Tumble” check (DC 10) failure results in remaining prone, but still provoking attacks of opportunity.

    6) Any successful attack against a sleeping, paralyzed, held, bound, or prone target is automatically considered a "threat" for a critical strike. Even if such an attack does not normally require a “to hit” roll, one must be rolled to determine if a critical strike was achieved.

    7) Raise dead is a ninth level spell, costing xp as a "miracle" spell. Resurrection and True Resurrection do not exist. To attempt to revive a corpse that does not fall within the "raise dead" guidelines is to invite calamity. (As per an overreaching “Wish”.)

    8) Healing spells convert "normal" damage into "subdual" damage, which heals at the normal rate of 1hp/level/hour.

    9) Falls of over 40 feet are AUTOMATICALLY incapacitating. Falls of over 100 feet are AUTOMATICALLY fatal. Mitigating circumstances (such as water, and special/magical abilities) may affect this rule.

    10) The blunt end of polearms, spears and tridents may be used as a double weapons with the purchase of an exotic weapon feat "non-conforming style". Use of this feat is a move equivalent action to alter grip. While using this feat, reach normally granted by these weapons is negated. Discontinuing use of this feat is a move equivalent action. Weapons used in this manner are not made for the purpose, and are more vulnerable to sunder attacks. Weapons used in this matter cannot be used for “massed” attacks as described above. The blunt end of these weapons does damage as a quarterstaff.

    11) Eastern weapons, whether arabic, turkish, indian or oriental are prohibited. "Silly" weapons are also prohibited. If there is any question in your mind about what constitutes "silly", consider how likely a wielder of the weapon is to hit himself with it, or consult the GM.

    12) The monk class does not exist. The feat "deflect arrows" also does not exist.

    13) Damage dealt by club, staff, as well as the blunt end of polearms, tridents, and spears, has a 50% chance of being subdual damage. Critical hits and magically enhanced weapons always cause "normal" type damage.

    14) Elf is a restricted race, not normally open to PC status. If you wish to play an elf (or a kobold, goblin, orc, or any "non-standard" race or template), consult the GM. Druid is a restricted class, not normally open to PC status. If you wish to play a druid, consult the GM.

    15) Character creation is accomplished by the standard point buy method. With a 25 point pool, as described in the DMG. (If there are any questions, as always, consult the GM.)

    16) The optional combat rules (instant-kill crit option, and death by massive damage) are the default system for this game. Instant-kill critical strikes require two rolls of a natural 20, regardless of modifiers to the critical range. Additionally, the variant critical success/failure rules for skill checks are the default system for this game.

    17) Any class, spell, equipment, or clerical domain not published in the Player's handbook will be reviewed by the GM on a case-by-case basis before admission to the game.

    18) Barring extraordinary mitigating circumstances, killing other PCs is strictly forbidden. Don't do it.

    19) XP is gained by overcoming challenges and advancing the story. Additional XP can be earned by excellent role-playing, entertaining the GM, and meeting character goals. These will be distributed after a major conflict is resolved, or at the end of every third session, whichever comes first. At the end of every session, the players will cast a secret ballot for the “best” role-player of that session. The GM will count the ballots, and award 100XP to the winner. This “bonus” XP is applied immediately.

    20) 1” hex grid will be the standard layout of the battlemat. With 1” representing 5’ unless otherwise described.

    21) The placement of a “burst” spell centering on a creature or object is automatic, unless stated otherwise in the spell description. The placement of such a spell centered in an unoccupied space is not. To simulate this, a d12 will be dropped from a height of at least three inches by the casting player onto the spot (on the battlemat) he intends to “target” with the spell. Where the die ends up, is where the spell is actually centered. (Standard deviation is generally about 1 ½” on the battleboard. Or about 8’ scale. Pretty amazingly accurate considering the difficulty most people have in judging distance.)

    22) Only Clerics and Wizards get literacy for free. Other classes must use skill points to buy it.

    23) Prone or kneeling humanoids can be flanked with only 90 degrees of separation between attackers, rather than the standard 180 degrees.

    24) Critical misses (a roll of 1 on a d20) in combat invoke attacks of opportunity.

    25) There is a soft cap on levels after total character level 10. At this point, advancement becomes geometric. To reach TCL 11, you have to earn as much total experience as it took you to reach TCL 10. To reach TCL 12 will require you to earn as much total experience as it took you to reach TCL 11. The sequence continues in a like fashion. NPCs of such high levels are almost unheard of, and magical items (rings, staffs, etc.) that must be created by such a high level wizard or sorcerer are extremely rare and valuable.

    26) Mithril bypasses silver DR. Admantium bypasses cold iron DR.

    27) The Bane weapon enhancement remains a +2 enhancement, and automatically bypasses all DR when attacking it’s specified foe.

    28) A whisper is a perfectly adequate vocal component for spells of the illusion and enchantment schools. Both schools are geared towards casting spells inconspicuously in social settings, and the official rules do not reflect this.
    Last edited by Parzival; 07-04-2009 at 09:19 PM. Reason: Automerged Double Post

  15. #30
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    CEBedford -

    I like the quirks rule, though its a standard rule in GURPS, I have also used it with White Wolf and d20. It is definitely one of the best character building rules/tools/skills/whatever I've ever come across and here's why.

    A lot of actors (and that's what role-playing really is) tend to internalize their characters. This happens all the time in role-playing environments, such as: my fighters family was killed by gnolls and now I hates them. Maybe this will show up in the game, when the party fights gnolls, or if somebody asks, but it's an internal characteristic. Quirks like "always says X," "always wears X," "uses colorful metaphors," "is always chewing gum" etc. project an external character, which means that the audience (the rest of the group) gets to see an actual character, and will then be more interested in the internal aspects.

    To illustrate, think of the movies. There are two types; those that are driven by a character and those that are driven by an actor. For example, I like Will Smith movies, but Will Smith always acts like Will Smith. Anthony Hopkins, however, does not always act like Hannibal Lecter (I hope). Christian Bale's "Batman voice," Darth Vader, Dustin Hoffman in Rain Man, and most of Brad Pitt's movies exemplify this. For example, Brad Pitt's character in Snatch, and his character in Burn After Reading are very very different.

    There's nothing wrong with internalized role-playing, afterall, this is a game and a hobby, for the sake of fun, not performance. However, externalizing character traits makes for a more rewarding experience.
    "Wit is educated insolence." - Aristotle

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