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    by Published on 10-26-2009 10:00 AM
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    2. One Geek to Another
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    Strangely, one of the most controversial parts of the Gen Con for the Aspiring Professional blog posts (or the Conventions for the Aspiring Game Professionals .pdf that was inspired by them) was the section on hygiene. More comments, conversations and mail came in about that one part than any other single section ...
    by Published on 09-21-2009 11:12 PM
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    2. Reviews
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    When I first cracked open Fantasy Craft, I expected to find a rehash of Dungeons and Dragons in some form or another. I was able to keep up this illusion throughout the opening chapter by telling myself that while the classes were different and there were a few unusual races in the lineup, this was still basically the game that I was already familiar with. The further I read, the more I knew that what Crafty Games had put together was actually something very different than ye ole D&D.

    Nestled within its four hundred pages, you will find everything that you need to play the game, including eleven playable races (with a boatload of splinter races), twelve base classes, six expert (prestige) classes, a gallery of NPCs, a bestiary, and all of the rules you will need to start playing the game. Since Fantasy Craft is built on top of the d20 Open Gaming License, the core engine of Fantasy Craft won’t be anything new to anyone who has ever played an OGL game. Where Fantasy Craft noticeably departs from the usual mold, though, is the way that it merges concepts that are seen more typically in modern genre games, such as a system for reputation, contacts and allies, looser management of character wealth, and an all around more cinematic approach. ...
    by Published on 08-05-2009 02:00 AM
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    2. Reviews
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    When Wizards of the Coast moved on to Dungeons and Dragons 4th edition, I was certain that D&D 3.5e was doomed to a slow, painful death. I foresaw that publishers who were previously releasing products under the 3.5 SRD and OGL (Open Gaming License) would see their audience vaporize in favor of a new and shiny system. The 3.5e enthusiast, I thought, would be consigned to a play a stagnant system with a bookshelf full of books that weren't even remotely compatible with the newest version.

    But, in March 2008, Paizo made it their mission to keep the third edition alive, announcing their intention to create the Pathfinder RPG that would expand on the SRD and OGL and would continue to be the official system for their now burgeoning Pathfinder Chronicles and Adventure Path products. To be honest, I wasn't certain how I felt about this at first. At first it seemed awkward—perhaps even blasphemous—for a company other than Wizards of the Coast to publish a core rulebook for Dungeons & Dragons, but then again, WotC wasn't the original publisher of D&D, either. So, a year and a half later, I am pleased to say that Paizo has really delivered.



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