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kirksmithicus
02-22-2009, 01:15 AM
A 13 year old girl from Maine was on NPR talking about falling asleep on the railroad tracks and then getting hit by a train. As a result of the accident she had to have her leg amputated. When she was asked to describe the experience of getting hit by the train she said, and I quote, "It hurt, wicked bad". I laughed my ass off. She later stated, that it took a few months before she came to the realization that her leg would not grow back. At this point I had to pull the car over and stop.



...I know, it's supposed to be wrong to laugh at the suffering and misery of others.

ChaunceyK
02-22-2009, 08:31 AM
I wouldn't call this "laughing at the suffering and misery of others" as much as "laughing at the stupidity of others."

At 13yo, I knew damn well not to take a nap on freakin' RAILROAD TRACKS!! :p

Rochin
02-22-2009, 09:33 AM
It is sad how clueless our youth is becoming. I agree when I was 13, damn almost 20 years ago lol, I knew way better than to sleep on train tracks or other dangerous places. Sad thing is her stupidity will be passed on to her kids, unless she marries a very smart man. I know somewhere it said something to the effect that stupid people will always out number the smart, because the smart are more selective with who they mate with. So true.

Kind of funny story, I would have laughed too. Legs do not grow back!!! Damn lol.

Etarnon
02-22-2009, 02:26 PM
I don't think this is funny at all.

Let's hear the laughter when your own legs get cut off, or go to a VA hospital and laugh at the guys with no legs or arms or sight there.

Interesting to hear the responses from those guys when you laugh in their face.

Grumpy Old Man
02-22-2009, 04:14 PM
I am a vet and I know a lot of people who lost limbs through accident in civilian life or duty putting them in the wrong place at the wrong time. For most of the amputee's I know laughing is a defensive strategy and helps keep them grounded in reality.

This kid fell asleep on the tracks, you have any idea how uncomfortable that would have had to been. Sorry but I'm thinking drugs or alcohol here and what kind of support does he have from his family that he found himself in that situation. Whole thing sounds hinky.

Rochin
02-23-2009, 08:40 AM
It is a sad thing to happen to a person, but my inital reaction would have been what I said above. Dealing with children of all ages, it is sad to see how little they actually know about anything. I am also in agreement that the parents lack of involvement helped that event take place. Parents today(at least in the school district where I live) do not take any part in their childs education, and if they do, it is usually negative. When I was growing up, my parents were always checking on how I was doing, if i needed any help etc. A few of the 5th graders at the school go home each night to an empty house(sometimes without any utilties on) and get to play grown up taking care of themselves and younger siblings, while the parent(usually not parents in many cases here) are either at work, getting high, or off not caring about their kids. It is sad.

Moritz
02-23-2009, 09:06 AM
Where is the Darwin Award committee when you need?

This will make a great story for my biology class. We were just discussing evolution and how humanity is out of the natural selection loop.

ronpyatt
02-23-2009, 09:24 AM
Dealing with children on a regular basis, it's interesting to see how much some know and how much they don't. Since their brains are still developing and the speed of development varies with each child, reality seeps into their awareness from different angles. It is no surprise that something like this happens. In fact, I am a little surprised this doesn't happen more often. Some brilliant children out there do the stupidest things.

It's easy to place the blame when we don't know the entire situation, the child's mental health, education, and other aspects we place on to this character's development. Perhaps the child was given something and was placed on the tracks deliberately by parents, friends, and bullies. Maybe they heard voices. Maybe the tracks were thought by this kid to no longer be in use, or it was only for a brief rest without the intent of actually falling asleep.

If the kid's accident had been the origin of a superhero character would we find it as funny or horrifying?

MortonStromgal
02-23-2009, 10:06 AM
Dealing with children on a regular basis, it's interesting to see how much some know and how much they don't. Since their brains are still developing and the speed of development varies with each child, reality seeps into their awareness from different angles. It is no surprise that something like this happens. In fact, I am a little surprised this doesn't happen more often. Some brilliant children out there do the stupidest things.

It's easy to place the blame when we don't know the entire situation, the child's mental health, education, and other aspects we place on to this character's development. Perhaps the child was given something and was placed on the tracks deliberately by parents, friends, and bullies. Maybe they heard voices. Maybe the tracks were thought by this kid to no longer be in use, or it was only for a brief rest without the intent of actually falling asleep.

If the kid's accident had been the origin of a superhero character would we find it as funny or horrifying?

Well where I live every 3-4 years some kid plays chicken with the train and looses, then the parents have a lawsuit against the train for not stopping. Common parents you should be teaching your kids me vs train you always loose.

Moritz
02-23-2009, 10:32 AM
Additionally, no drugs or alcohol were involved. Just poor judgement:

http://wbztv.com/local/maine.train.crash.2.734918.html

http://www.wmur.com/news/16413056/detail.html

InvestFDC
02-23-2009, 10:42 AM
This is the state of education in America. We double the education budget every3-5 years and kids are getting dumber. I hate to say it but I'm not surprised that a kid living in the liberal bastion of the North East would expect her leg to grow back. Let alone sleep on the tracks. France, here we come!!!

GoddessGood
02-23-2009, 10:51 AM
Double the education budget every 3-5 years? I want to know where you went to school. Where I am, they're cutting the budgets, increasing class sizes, using ancient books and farming out the school lunches to the fast food industry for a little extra cash. All of that was going on even before the current economic crisis ... I wonder where you got your numbers from?

Moritz
02-23-2009, 10:51 AM
What does being liberal have to do with education?

Rochin
02-23-2009, 11:38 AM
Double the education budget every 3-5 years? I want to know where you went to school. Where I am, they're cutting the budgets, increasing class sizes, using ancient books and farming out the school lunches to the fast food industry for a little extra cash. All of that was going on even before the current economic crisis ... I wonder where you got your numbers from?


Well said, well said indeed. My wife works for a school district and they are in the process of getting rid of non useful personel. So if you are a teacher with a small class size, you will be cut and your kids added to another. Math, Science and English specialists are going to be cut as they are not full in room teachers. According to the state laws 22 kids is the max my wife can have in 4th grade, yet she has 25. The district knows of the violation and ignores it. As far as the budget getting increased, that is total lies, at least here in Texas. Teacher pay has went up a total of 2% in the last 5 years. To add me on to our insurance is an extra 467 dollars each month in addition to the 256 we already have taken out for my wife and 2 kids. That is in addition to the 4500 a year that the school district pays towards her insruance.

Summer schools are being cut, same with after school tutoring. So if a teacher gets bad scores on the TAKs test(a test students must pass to move on to another grade) they will be fired, and blamed for the low scores. If where you are eduction gets doubled every few years, that is great. In my wifes district 4 out of 5 kids is on free lunch, has only 1 parent and lives in the below poverty level, less than 19k a year for a full family. Seeing how the community has no money, there is no way to increase the schools budget. Our Govenor here is a joke, and keeps taking pay increases away from vital areas.

Sorry for the rant, I am very passionate on the whole issue of education taking a back seat and then congress and the big wigs *****ing because students do not excel. My wife and I had to purchase and get computers donated so the kids in her class would have them. Everything besides a teacher desk and student desks is also paid for by us, with tiny if any reinbursement. Ooops sorry, ill stop. Must... rant... oh look a can of Mt Dew.....

mrken
02-23-2009, 03:28 PM
You guys have books??? My kid's schools have one set of books and share them with all classes. Have never seen a book come home, ever. How on earth do they expect them to read or study at home???

GoddessGood
02-23-2009, 04:11 PM
Wow. Didn't know it had gotten that bad. When I was in highschool, we each had our own (falling apart, outdated) book to take him or keep in a locker, whathaveyou. The teacher also had a teacher's copy and maybe 5 to 10 class books that you could use if you forgot yours (they were often in worse shape than the books they passed out). I'll always remember the multiple shades of purple my mom turned when she heard about the $60,000 mural our principal commissioned for the library. It was an ugly mural, too, and he used the bulk of our UIL budget to pay for it. In a school with no sports, UIL was all there was for a lot of us.

Dimthar
02-23-2009, 07:40 PM
Personally I would not put any blame on the School systems, Congress or Poverty.

Poor uneducated people know better I am pretty sure!

boulet
02-23-2009, 09:50 PM
This is the state of education in America. We double the education budget every3-5 years and kids are getting dumber. I hate to say it but I'm not surprised that a kid living in the liberal bastion of the North East would expect her leg to grow back. Let alone sleep on the tracks. France, here we come!!!
I don't remember ever being told it was ok to sleep on railroad tracks, or that human limbs can grow back and I'm a pure product of French education system. Seems it's not that bad : I even managed to get a position as software engineer in a R&D department in the US.

I don't know what you plan to demonstrate by comparing the USA with France, but it's clearly showing you're not the brightest bulb in the box.

Etarnon
02-24-2009, 12:05 AM
France, here we come!!!

Exactly the kind of ignorance this place doesn't need. This is what I'm saying.

Skunkape
02-24-2009, 06:48 AM
Having first hand experience, I have to say quite a bit of a child's development is influenced by their parents, even when the parent's are not directly involved with the child's development.

My wife and I have attempted to help my wife's grandson to develop into a productive member of society, including having him live with us, sending him to school, making sure he was in an after school basketball and baseball program, yet the child would rather be like his mother and father, both drains on society.

We got to the point where we just couldn't deal with his disobedience and lack of respect and the fact that he kept running away only made things worst. Finally, he went back to living with his mother, till she got tired of dealing with him as well, so once again, he's living on his own as a minor, at the age of 17.

We're trying to help the police find him so that they'll be able to attempt to resolve his criminal behavior before he becomes an adult, but I'm pretty sure he's on his way to becoming a career criminal or dead.

Unfortunately, the role of a bad parent usually ends up influencing the child more than any other part of the child's interactions with society, but don't think that you can only blame the parent, each part will have an effect on the child and if the child doesn't want to take responsibility for his or her actions, then there's not a lot you can do.

Personally, I'm afraid for my future.

tesral
02-24-2009, 12:48 PM
Children will life up to, or down to, out expectations. Expect nothing and that is exactly what you get.

I refer the readership to this article "The Smothering Instinct (http://phoenixinn.iwarp.com/Politicks/smother.html)" I think a lot of the answers will be found therein.

GoddessGood
02-24-2009, 01:37 PM
As one of three children raised by a helicopter mom (and each other, of course), I can say I identify with a lot of those statements. I think the over-medication of the American youth has a lot to do with the tendency of baby-boomers to smother their children with good intentions. When I was young I was wild, loud, unfocused and creative. I won many creative contests and even had a short story of my own published in an anthology. When I hit about 10 or 11, I was tested to have the vocabulary and comprehension of a college freshman.

At the age of 12, I was placed on ADD medication. The only creative output I had for 5 years after that were assigned essays and RPGs. I took myself off the medication when I came of age, chiefly because the doctor wanted to put me on anti-depressant meds to help my sleeping. I didn't feel depressed and was sick of taking pills, so I refused and stopped taking all of the medications completely. What followed was several painful and emotional years of rediscovering what it meant to be a thinking, feeling, creative human being. I am still introverted, though much less so. I am still shy, though I am struggling to overcome this. In my workplace I am often critiqued for waiting to be told what to do next instead of seeking new opportunities.

My older sister watched me struggle with my mom. It wasn't until about two years ago that she finally realized that I wasn't just being contrary and fighting with my mom, I was letting myself be more important that what mom wanted for me. She's doing the same now, but the hardest part for us is watching our younger brother. He does not leave his room except to eat, use the bathroom, bathe (when told to), or to be driven to school. He is now a sophomore in college, still living at home with mom. He was diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asperger_syndrome). We feel he subconsciously uses this diagnosis as a crutch, because as long as mom is taking care of him he doesn't have to take any risks or suffer any consequences. We believe he is a normal, intelligent person who has been brainwashed into thinking he is damaged, who simply has not learned that he has it in himself to be his own person. I hear him talk about getting married and having a family, but the way he is living it simply isn't possible. He hasn't developed the habits and skills necessary to take care of himself, let alone another human being.

Now I don't want anyone to think I'm maligning my mom. She did absolutely the best she could to raise us alone. She raised us the way she thought was right, and I love her very much. I just hope she knows I won't be taking a single shred of her advice on parenting :).

boulet
02-24-2009, 02:38 PM
Wow GoddessGood. Thank you for sharing something so personal. I'm flabbergasted.

GoddessGood
02-24-2009, 03:09 PM
Thanks, boulet. Talking about the past helps me learn from it. It always surprises me when people think I've gone through something remarkable. It was just my life, and I just lived it. I couldn't do anything less and am too lazy to do much more than that ;).

Rochin
02-24-2009, 05:13 PM
Very interesting views GoddessGood, and thanks for the personal story. It seems like your DR's were the kind of pill pushers that society demands at the current state. My childhood was much like yours, actions, behavior etc. The only change was my Mom did not have me tested, poked or prodded by any DR's. The only time I went was when I was very sick or when I had open heart surgery when I was 18 months old.

Now I can say I am an adult, my son has Asperger's Syndrome (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asperger_syndrome) and this was not something that my wife and I decided on one day. He was never what would be called normal, never slept though the night till age 4, rocked and always had some random hand and arm movements. It took us till he was almost 6 to get him seen by a DR. He now is 9 and with his medication he is what I would say is 85% normal. He still has the "flapping" and other types of things, but for the most part is a normal kid. I do stay at home and homeschool him however(public school does not want to put the effort into working with him, only labeling him a retard and putting him in with very mentally disabled children, which is no good for either of them). The more and more I work with him and talk with my Mom, I decided to go to a DR as well. I for the most part am just like my son and he like me. Besides the "flapping" and other things that you can control when your older, I am a clone of him and he of me. I do take a few meds, similar but not the same as my son, and I have noticed that I am better able to function.

I feel for your childhood very much. I am glad you worked out your DR misgivings. Like you said not everyone needs meds. As far as your brother, older kids and adults can usually have some control over what they do. If he rocks back and forth, makes any high pitched squels when he is excited or cannot look you in the eyes for longer than 10 seconds, he may have Asperger's Syndrome (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asperger_syndrome). I am by far no expert, so maybe he is just being a lazy good for nothing. :)

Edit: That is a lot of rattling on, sorry guys.

nijineko
02-26-2009, 11:57 PM
ah, the woes of the american education system.... i too, am a product of it's frequently uncaring iron hand.

i'll start by mentioning a few related items.

one, the first time my age caught up to the number of times i had moved was when i turned 20 or 21. thus i had something on the order of 5 or 6 elementary schools, plus a stint in germany for kindergarten and part of first grade, three junior high schools and two high schools. (i had to stay behind when my family moved to another state again, just in order to finish high school at my second school, and not add a third school to it!)

two, my dad couldn't keep a job for more than a few months to a year or so. this occasioned a few of our moves.

third, after my parents got divorced, i had to help raise my siblings... though that wasn't much of a change, i had had to babysit on and off since i was nine or something. that article that tesral wrote and the one it cited, i can feel... i was one of those kids on free lunch through a lot of school. i'm just grateful that our church has an incredible welfare system, it was the only way we ate, a lot of the time. i would just take failures in classes that required you to purchase some kit or special materials for a project, so that i wouldn't have to ask my parents for money i already knew we didn't have.

i remember one school where i had a horrible time with homework, i had four to five different teachers and each one had a separate method for turning in homework. with one you had to remember to bring it up to the desk yourself, another would only accept it in a folder, another had to have it put in these boxes, and another had us hand it up the rows to the front. seriously inconsistent.

i remember frequently getting sent to the office for various things... not having homework (even if i did have it, just not in the right 'spot'), disagreeing with the teacher, getting picked on as the new kid and set up to get in trouble for thing i didn't do, not socializing with the other students (gee, wonder why), speaking out against things i perceived as unjust, drawing pictures non-stop in class, being noisy and disruptive in class (aka finishing a test within ten or twenty minutes when it took most everyone else an hour, and being told to sit quietly and wait for the rest to finish, and no you can't draw because it distracts the other students-a personal <heavysarcase>favorite</heavysarcasm> of mine....), i could go on, but you get the idea.

my teachers frequently developed reflexes of taking away any paper i was using a pencil on. several times it turned out to be my homework, as they would assume i was drawing again and just snatch whatever it was, cause i was working on it instead of "listening".

in any case, my excellent test scores should have showed that i knew the material perfectly, my lack of homework should have indicated that the mind numbing repetition wasn't always needed to get the point home to me. what actually happened? i got sent to the school counselors and psychological staff to figure out what was wrong with me.

one of them (very popular with all the jocks and bullies and glamour queens and otherwise "in-crowd" types) "knew exactly what my problem was" and proceeded to loudly tell me (that is, everyone in the crowd of people around me in the hall that happened to be nearby when he chose to conduct his so-called counseling sessions) what my problems were and how i could fix them by being just like everyone else and not making waves (ie-being a creative individual). this is where i learned how to tell the truth with a straight face, and with lots and lots of spin. i later decided that self-defense or no, it was still a form of deception and i've spent most of the rest of my life so far trying to unlearn those skills.

another figured that the best way to figure out what was wrong with me was to try to deliberately make me loose my temper. yeah, i pulled the plug on that. enough said.

eventually i got sent for special testing to see if there was something cognitively wrong with me. that was fifth grade. once they found out that i was reading and easily comprehending concepts and materials at the college level (the highest the american system can test for) they finally decided i was just bad, or lazy, or felt i was superior to others, or something-take you pick. i was given a lot of "problem-child" options to choose from. i just decided to go draw more pictures. and read books. this is where i learned to draw out my angers and frustrations into a drawing and then burn it, purging myself of the feelings thereby. that is also where i sadly learned enough from the psychs to figure out how to self-hypnotize and started messing with my head in an effort to protect myself from their probing, leading to much painful reconnection and reconstruction later in my teens where i had to learn how to feel my emotions again.

unfortunately for me, i had a tendency to try to get some kind of positive support from the teacher by showing what i knew. i would get some, at a cost. the cost of getting home anywhere from 1 to 3 hours late evading whomever i'd managed to piss off that week so that they decided to teach me a lesson with their fists. or rocks. or metal bars. (that school was under construction... lots of weapons to choose from laying around.) that's also where i learned how to use a bicycle as a weapon against people and other bikes, how to ride across ice at full speed without falling, how to ride up to a fence at full speed-dismount, throw the bike over the fence, jump and land partway up and be over the fence and back on the bike and off- all before they could catch up to me.

junior-high? more or less the same, with the added bonus of getting slammed into locker walls when the teachers weren't around. or booked in the hallways. or pinched, punched, charlie-horsed, or spit on. (being booked, for those who haven't heard that term, is having all your books and papers knocked out of your hands in such a way to cover as much of the hallway as possible. bonus points for hitting other undesirables with the flying stuff. and charlie-horsing is the art of targeting the sensitive nerve cluster between the two large muscles on the arms or legs which painfully numbs them.)

jump to high-school. i'm still being sent to the counselor every week to figure out what's wrong with me. they dither and dally around, finally the decide to test me again to see if i'm gifted. (that counselor was halfway cool, being jewish, he understood persecution and not fitting in very, very, well. we got alone well.) fine. i'm tested again. yes, i'm still "gifted", whatever that's supposed to mean. so they put me in some so-called gifted classes. which amounted to the same work load everyone else was doing, plus more work. not even more difficult work. just more work. which means more homework... which, if you don't know, in the american school system can amount from anywhere to 40-60% of your grade in a given class, depending on the school system in question. oh, and did i mention the official school district policy of grading student against the "students actual potential as judged by what the teacher thinks it is" instead of by the assignment parameters? i'm sure you can see how that has the potential for abuse.

well, as usual i did fine on the tests, and poorly on the homework. so they kicked me out of the gifted program. and decided that i should be put in remedial classes. even better... remedial study hall! i didn't even know that there was such a thing. at least i did some good by tutoring the teachers who were in charge of it so that they could help the other students with their homework....

now that i'm an adult, they tell me i have had a.d.d. for most of my life. and i was put on drugs for that.... which helped my focus and response time a bit, but made creative thinking a really difficult challenge. so, i quit the drugs. i've been to several doctors since... they argue about wether i have a.d.d. or not. go figure.

my little brother is a close clone of me. really intelligent, doesn't know when to shut his mouth. similar problems in school. sigh. i've tried to give him advice, but for the most part i try to listen and not preach. after all, he may be similar, but he's not the same. all the same i offer whatever he is willing to hear. and try really hard to shut up and hear him out the rest of the time. he's about 14 years younger than me. at least we have similar interests in rpg and stories and japan and whatnot to keep us talking. he reports the same difficulties with concentrating and focus, same ease on tests, and difficulty with homework. he also has some of the same issues sensing time that i do. and the hearing....

the older of my younger sisters barely graduated high school. she is the most obviously affected. she can't comprehend a third of what is said to her. as in you speak but she hears noise instead of words. we all have it to differing degrees. my brother is better than i am. so my sister relies on guessing about what you are saying via the tone of your voice. you speak nice words in a strong or harsh voice, and she'll burst out into tears. she's as intelligent as the rest of us, but doesn't want to have to do all the responsibilities associated with being an adult. and frankly she can't be allowed to live on her own. she is too trusting of complete strangers. she's had people move in on her and just camp at her place cause she can't stand up to the confrontation, and doesn't know what to do when she says no, or get out, and they just ignore her or blow it off....

my other little sister is the least affected of all of us. she has the same symptoms that we all do, but in her they are minimized and simply quirks that rarely interfere with her life in any significant way. happily married with a boy, and she is graduating this year! the first of our immediate family to do so! yea her!

since we can't trust the schools or the psychs or even the docs, we compare notes a lot and try to help each other out the best we can. luckily our mom was able to home-school the girls and the bro. using an home-school association gave needed social skills while still allowing them to learn the way they do, instead of being hammered into the ill-fitting shape that the school system teaches.

even so, i survived. i learned... and then unleared a lot and replaced it with new learning. i was blessed to conquer my temper and overcome it. i developed faith in the potential of the human race, and even in the potential of my country, despite all the flaws in both. i have a wife of just about ten years (this may!), two beautiful boys, a steady job, and am trying to nail down that college education that neither of my parents finished. i achieved a rank higher than my dad in boy scouts, maybe my boys will manage to get eagles. my dad and i are actually on speaking terms again. which is good, cause i have him to thank for my interests in computers and fantasy/sci-fi and roleplaying. he even gave me his old white box set and the original dice that came with it. there is hope in life, even if that hope gutters from all the stuff going on in the world.

maybe if enough of us set the example, and teach where we can, we can eventually lessen the number of teenage girls who don't know enough to not be on railroad tracks, letting themselves be unaware of their surroundings.

kirksmithicus
02-27-2009, 12:23 AM
I don't think this is funny at all.

Let's hear the laughter when your own legs get cut off, or go to a VA hospital and laugh at the guys with no legs or arms or sight there.

Interesting to hear the responses from those guys when you laugh in their face.

The majority of military veterans received their wounds through no fault of their own. Compliments of these guys known as "the enemy". These two received their wounds through their own ignorance and stupidity, and I'm not sure how we got on the topic of disabled vets anyway. There is a difference though, and I don't appreciate the cheap shot insinuating that I'm some sort of unpatriotic prick, because I'm just a regular prick :D. I don't know about you, but when I was in the Army, we were trained to be numb to the suffering of other, as this makes it easier to deal with seeing dead people, and making living people dead. Apparently my callous attitude toward the suffering of others is taking a while to wear off, because I also find the following things to still be quite funny;



the fact that my grandfather blew his hand off while fishing with dynamite.
when my brother cut his finger off and they sewed it back on sideways.
That my one-eyed uncle has the nickname "cyclops".
That my cousin died in car accident with a manure truck, and my brother said, "dude, that's a shitty way to die".


Things like this though, don't make me laugh.

Laith Joshua Dougherty (http://laithdougherty.info/)


I'm guessing that the biggest reason you didn't find it as funny as I did is because you are a better, more humane person than I am. Go figure. And should I cut my own legs off being a dumbass, feel free to laugh all you want.

nijineko
02-27-2009, 12:28 AM
i have to admit, i didn't quite get the relation to veterans either. there is humor in others stupidity, even if it's not polite to laugh. (then again, i'm not all that polite.... just ask my wife!) i admit to having chuckled till it hurt (i was in a bookstore and trying to be quiet) reading the darwin awards books.

wow, fishing with dynamite, now that's old school. like the new icon, btw. =D

tesral
02-27-2009, 12:44 AM
I know where you coming from there Nijineko. However, I was also gifted with a football player's build (No interest in the sport). Not many bullies would bother with me, I flattened back. However having a reputation as a straight shooter with the teachers was in my favor. I prefered the compnay of adults. I talked to teachers and listened. I remember one particularity slow learner was bugging me in the lunch line. I turned around, picked him up, slamed him into the wall and said "leave me alone" Nodded to the Vice Principle and teacher watching and stepped back in line. No that would never happen in todays locked down ZT schools.

He was a slow learner. He tried jumping on my back while I was tying my shoe. I brushed him off, (tossing him agiasnt the lockers) and walked away. Then when I was running outside he stepped in my way. I felt a bump and kept going. My friends told me later he bounced off the brick wall afer I went through him. He was real quiet the rest of the day. Slow learner.

We didn't do the moving around. I had four schools total, two elementry (we did move once) Jr. High and High. High School was five blocks from my house. I did have your issues with homework. It was just so pointless. Make work for after the makework in school. I only ever found a couple of teachers that graded results, and I was golden with them. American History. I would sit in class and read (not a history book mostly), but when it came to discussion I got involved. I aced the tests. Teacher was cool with it. I didn't take the final and passed with an A. I was in the room, reading (not a school book.)

Most of the time I strugged with grades, but not the knowledge. I knew my subjects, but writing is a painful process, I've never been good with a pen. (I LOVE computers) But teachers that graded on volume of work were not my friends.

But generally after I hit puberty the other kids left me alone physically. I was just too big. I didn't question it. I broadened my shoulders and looked mean. I'm not, I never have been. But it kept them away from me.



I'm guessing that the biggest reason you didn't find it as funny as I did is because you are a better, more humane person than I am. Go figure. And should I cut my own legs off being a dumbass, feel free to laugh all you want.

Well I have been noted for suffering fools poorly and liking fools to suffer. I feel sorry for the guy that was driving that engine. He couldn't stop, or do anything about it. He has to live with cutting that girl's leg off and he doesn't deserve to. She is the sole author and responsible party for her pain. She doesn't deserve a single cent.

Skunkape
02-27-2009, 08:49 AM
Something I've noticed has been happening with our society over the last couple hundred years as we're becoming more 'civilized', our children are staying children much longer than before. Granted, we're living longer and that allows the parents to take longer before making our children grow up, just a little over 100/200 years ago, you were considered mature at a much younger age than 18.

Most women would have been considered old maids if they weren't married by the age of 20. The skill sets of a person age 18 from the late 1800s early 1900s allowed them to survive a whole lot better than most of the same age today. My parents made sure to instill a skill/value system that would have allowed me to leave home and be successful by 16 even though I wasn't an adult till 18 and didn't really completely leave home with my own place till I was in my mid-20s due to college. Which is something I really appreciate them for, but I could have been on my own at 16.

Sure I would have made mistakes, but I make mistakes now, 30 odd years later. I'm not saying that children shouldn't be allowed to be children, and that not everyone is capable of handling responsibility at the same age, but I really think we as a society are doing something wrong with our children that although we're much more 'civilized' is going to become a bigger problem in the future.

But I can say, my brother did a great job with my nephew and have already told my nephew, he's going to be taking care of my brother and his wife and my wife and myself when we're old and grey!:D

nijineko
02-27-2009, 09:20 AM
i quite agree about the skill sets! my mom made us all learn how to cook, clean, do laundry, simple accounting, even basic sewing. seriously, the only difference between scouts and my mom was that i got to play with fire and with weapons, and got rewarded for it with memorabilia. ^^

excellent points, gg. i know i learned a lot about how not to parent from my mom and step dad, as well as from my dad and his wife.

Sneaksta
02-28-2009, 10:09 AM
I think the state of the world today is unfettered laziness.... the parents/teachers/doctors dont want to take the time to really understand kids these days, or think they are too busy to pay them the necessary attention, so they just push the pills... Pop 2 of these and 1 of these each day, and viola... dazed, calm, stupified kids.... I was lucky that my Father told the docs they were full of scat! They tried to label me ADD and hyperactive blah blah blah, but he was having none of it... Plain and simple, I was bored out of my skull, and got into Tons! of trouble to make school, at the very least, marginally interesting.... only went to my head when in 7th grade i scored college level in everything on their so called Nationaltests...that's when the real fun began.... lol

spotlight
02-28-2009, 11:47 AM
It's not that the doc/parent/teachers/ect. don't understand kids today. Partly it is that they are just as screwed up themselves. I have been thru many of the things the rest of you guys here have mentioned. I scored college level also in the sixth grade. but in high school I was but in a remidial math class, at the same time taking Geometry and a bussiness math class. WHO allowed that? so went my freshman year.

Lots of other problems existed. It wasn't until I was 32 that I was diagnosed as being dislexic. But I already suspected it, I always had trouble spelling. My mother actually spent her afternoons with me for several years, playing scrabble, just us two, to help me 'see' the words. Now its been admitted that several other family members are dislexic, includeing my father, who had to learn to read to pass his plumber's licence tests.

My own son, I had to throw out on his rear, at the ripe old age of 16. For years he hated me, but now he calls me regularly to get advice on his own 14 year old son. He at least learned respect, if nothing else. I let him know regularly how proud I am of him for sticking it out and trying. That is about all any off us can do in this world. Thank God for Armageddon and the future when this garbage will be elliminated.

Dimthar
02-28-2009, 10:05 PM
Since Education seems to be the Topic.

Currently how much control does a "Parent" have on the subjects/classes your kid takes?

I made my mind that I will not allow my daughters to take Spanish @ School (That is a Job I am reserving for myself).

Would that plan of mine be possible (assuming nothing changes in the next 10y.

tellis
02-28-2009, 10:29 PM
the army is working on growing back limbs and has already grown back fingers. i saw a story about it on one of those 60 minutes type news/ entertainment shows. i thought it was one of the most hopeful things ive seen in a long time about the army. i will see if i can find the story and get back with a link, im not that good at researching so if anyone comes across this first i would be relieved.-tellis:humble:

spotlight
03-03-2009, 12:59 PM
And as for that 13y old girl falling asleep on the train tracks and losing a legt for it ... Sorry, guys, I probablly would LMAO, also. It is a shame, but a study I read back in the early 70's showed that a white person getting on a bus in NY, having the choice of sitting next to a black person or sitting next to an amputee, will sit next to the black person. Although the writer did not show actual proof of their conclusions, they claimed it was a reponce of "I'll never be black like this man, but I don't want to be like the amputee."

It was suggested that ALL people have problems with racism, but they FEAR becoming disabled. Me, I do find I have some wrong attitudes about other people now and then, but being partially disabled, I find this stuff truely laghable. And not in a funny way.

The way things happen, like the Apostle Paul wrote: Time and chance befall us all. Yeah, its a shame when people get hurt, but we still watch 'Jackass' and 'America's funniest Home Videos', don't we?

Grumpy Old Man
03-13-2009, 04:50 PM
Never paid much attention to things like that when I was younger because I knew people with wooden legs, humped up backs or shriveled arms from polio or confined to a wheel chair because of MS. They were just part of life. I learned to play chess from the guy with the bad back, only thing he could participate in gym class with us was swimming, everything else he sat out and I can't think of anybody in my group who thought less of him for it. Fast forward 40 years and its a different world with a whole new class of rude and in spite of so called sensitivity training and mandated equal rights the problem is worse now than it was in the 50's and 60's.

Personally now that I am on crutches myself and I see somebody struggling in a wheelchair, cane or crutches I'll offer to help which often gets an able bodied person who had been ignoring the struggle, over to help.

Waiting in line at a store or a waiting room at the doctors office I'll ask somebody who is an obvious amputee in a wheel chair if he wants to race. I always, always get a laugh from them and a challenge back with them usually offering me a head start since I was obviously crippled. The conversation starts from there and they are glad to talk with anybody who doesn't pretend to not see them so they don't have to deal with them.

I think part of it is because kids who are different are segregated in the 'different' classes or they stay home or are in institutions. There was some of that when I was younger too but it was hard to walk down the street from school to our house without seeing Andy the MS guy in his chair at the end of his sidewalk so the kids going home could say hi or seeing (I think her name was Carol Ann) come running up to you and giving you a hug because she loved everybody. Those who called her a retard usually learned not to say it around her friends or family and there were a lot of us.

I think the one thing you can say about being normal is there is no such thing. I also think you are more likely to find creative intelligent and sensitive people on sites like this than on some of the more serious sites I am on because it takes a sense of humor, creativeness and mental flexibility to play a silly game like D&D for, (well in my case since 1976), and I was already in my 30's with kids of my own in grade school who brought me to the game.

Reading the post of how the girls got cut they were obviously trying to escape and were too slow. I still have to wonder why they were laying on an active track. There is more to this story then they are telling us. Hopefully this was a wake up call for them and they get back on track, figuratively speaking, no pun intended.

tesral
03-13-2009, 10:18 PM
I think the one thing you can say about being normal is there is no such thing. I also think you are more likely to find creative intelligent and sensitive people on sites like this than on some of the more serious sites I am on because it takes a sense of humor, creativeness and mental flexibility to play a silly game like D&D for, (well in my case since 1976), and I was already in my 30's with kids of my own in grade school who brought me to the game. .

We had the blind clarinetist in orchestra. That guy could play and he didn't read a note of music. :) Someone would play the part for him and go over the line notes. He learned it that way. Note perfect and knew his music. Incredible musician when you consider the handicap of not having the music in front of your eyes. He really gave the rest of us no excuse.

When I ran into him out of school I was always glad to give him an elbow to the bus stop. He liked it because he could move faster with a "guide dog" than with his cane.

Skunkape
03-16-2009, 07:36 AM
We had the blind clarinetist in orchestra. That guy could play and he didn't read a note of music. :) Someone would play the part for him and go over the line notes. He learned it that way. Note perfect and knew his music. Incredible musician when you consider the handicap of not having the music in front of your eyes. He really gave the rest of us no excuse.

When I ran into him out of school I was always glad to give him an elbow to the bus stop. He liked it because he could move faster with a "guide dog" than with his cane.

I'll bet his not having sight helped him with his hearing to the point where his pitch was probably really good.

InMediaRes
03-16-2009, 08:20 AM
They're doing studies now on the rational thought processes that happen in your brain, and what they're learning is rather counterintuitive. People that have had their emotional centers damaged in head injuries are unable to make rational decisions in many cases, though their intellectual centers are completely unharmed.

What quite a few respective neuropsychologists believe is that kids are getting technically smarter, in terms of how many technological processes they can maintain with minimal effort (imagine your grandmother having 15 chat windows open at once, all active). The hitch is that electrical processes take effect much faster that chemical, so the hormones that result in having an emotional commitment to your actions and their ramifications can't respond to what you're thinking fast enough.

In short, kids aren't getting any dumber, it's just that evolution is leading in a counterintuitive arc. Evolution doesn't stop hamsters from eating their offspring, because rapid birth rates overcome their biological need NOT to eat their babies.

In any case, I'd say this girl should be first in line for the soylent project, but that's just me.