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GoddessGood
02-16-2009, 12:17 PM
I'm looking for some advice. As an avid crafter I can never have to many outlets for creativity. Thus far, I can crochet, knit and cross-stitch as well as attempt some pretty disappointing drawing, painting and sculpting. I was given a sewing machine last Christmas and have yet to make use of it. To be blunt, it intimidates me. It sits there in all it's gleaming white glory and mocks me with it's "easy to use" features and cryptic button technology. Curse you, demon Janome! I could read the manual ... but that's too much like common sense, and we simply can't have that ;)

So I'm asking everyone out there that sews or maybe makes their own costumes for advice. What tips would you give a humble newb like me for her first time on a new machine (oh my gawd, the double entendre!)? What tricks of the trade have you learned that you'd care to pass on? In return, I can promise lots of pics of my goofy attempts :thumb:

mrken
02-16-2009, 12:29 PM
hey Goddess Good, my wife has this real nice sewing machine and does very little with it. For years I have offered to use it to create costumes on it if she would at least teach me how to turn it on and make it sew. I am fairly good at seeing abstract things in 3D and think sewing might be way easier than it looks. I will be watching this thread with more than a little interest. :)

GoddessGood
02-16-2009, 01:43 PM
Well, for you then, I will share one of the tips I learned from a friend of mine who was sewing at (of all places) the new years party I went to. She showed me how to make the simplest skirt I could ever imagine making.

You start with a rectangular panel as long as the perimeter of the bottom of the skirt.
http://i179.photobucket.com/albums/w314/amillerz/sewing/skirt1-1.jpg
You cut this in half in the middle, fold it in half and sew it back up on side (this is one of the side hems).
http://i179.photobucket.com/albums/w314/amillerz/sewing/skirt2.jpghttp://i179.photobucket.com/albums/w314/amillerz/sewing/skirt3.jpg
Next, you open it up again so that you can see the cut edges of the panel (this is the "wrong" side of the panel). Take a cord (rope, ribbon or whathaveyou) that is at least two feet longer than the original panel and lay it across the top of the skirt panel close to the top. You might want to pin it into place.
http://i179.photobucket.com/albums/w314/amillerz/sewing/skirt4.jpg
Then you fold the top of the panel down over the cord and sew it to the rest of the panel, making a tube of fabric that the cord can slide through. This is the waistband.
http://i179.photobucket.com/albums/w314/amillerz/sewing/skirt5.jpg
Finally, fold the panel in half so that the cut edge of the side seam and the waistband are on the outside and the neat edges are on the inside. This is "right sides together" or "wrong side out". Sew up the open side almost all the way to the top, but leave the waistband tube open so the cord can dangle out. This is the other side seam.
http://i179.photobucket.com/albums/w314/amillerz/sewing/skirt6.jpg
Now turn it inside out and you got yourself a skirt. It doesn't look like one yet, but ask your lady to try it on so you can fit it to her by cinching the cord to fit her waist. You can tie this in a knot or fasten it some other way. Alternately, you could have used an elastic cord so it'd be stretchy and more comfortable. To finish it up, fold the bottom cut edge up and sew it into place at a comfortable height (depends on how short you want the skirt). This is the bottom hem, and now the skirt's done.
http://i179.photobucket.com/albums/w314/amillerz/sewing/skirt8.jpg

mrken
02-16-2009, 02:50 PM
Oh goodie, now I will finally have a skirt to wear. ;D Actually my wife was going to make a kilt for me to wear for when we were going to the SCA events, but we haven't been there in years so I think I am safe.

GoddessGood
02-16-2009, 02:55 PM
Yup, that was part of the reason for my interest in sewing in the first place. The tartan alone is ungodly expensive, but if you have an uncommon tartan and want to buy a piece of clothing in it ... it's just not worth it. My sister and I are planning on making ourselves "bonnie lassie" type costumes with our great-grandfather's tartan, but neither of us know how to sew. I'd like to know the basics before I go messing up fabric that costs $60 a yard.

MortonStromgal
02-16-2009, 05:25 PM
My kilt with my crazy tarten was around $400 for just the skirt part. Its ALOT of fabric though.

mrken
02-16-2009, 07:12 PM
My wife got me a buckle and the whole nine yards of material. It isn't "my" Tarten, but I'm not Scottish, just have nice legs. lol Hey, not my words, my wife's, I was a runner since I was ten. That'll happen to ya if you run ten miles a day for twenty years. But then, so will cartilage degeneration.

GoddessGood
02-17-2009, 08:13 AM
Heh, I'll post up instructions for making wrap pants once I figure them out. It seems like they'd be another easy construction. It's basically a cloth diaper with legs, if you think about it.

Or, you can use these ... they come complete with mystic symbols!
Wrap Pants pattern (.pdf) (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkx5XxZpJg3cBaANXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTByZWgwN28 5BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMQRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkAw--/SIG=129df8u1v/EXP=1234966231/**http%3a//www.amtgard-wl.com/library/howtos/how2wrap.pdf)

nijineko
02-17-2009, 09:55 AM
you don't want my advice. i passed basic boy scout sewing of objects stuff... but that's pretty much what it looks like. a ten-year old's attempt at sewing. it'll hold together, but that's the only guarantee. ^^ my wife is more in your situation. she's gotten to the point of getting the machine to sew straight lines, but steer clear of her when she's doing it... otherwise you might get into the line of fire, while she fights with it.

Valdar
02-17-2009, 02:04 PM
I'd say go with commercial patterns. The clothes you make are much more comfortable than if you go with simple rectangles.

I just finished a tunic with this pattern, and it looks good and was easy to do:

http://www.habithat.co.uk/product_info.php/products_id/7127

GoddessGood
02-17-2009, 04:32 PM
Ooh! Can we see a picture?

I have amassed a collection of patterns, mostly Simplicity and McCall's. What I'm really looking for is tricks of the trade. For example, what does Nijineko's wife get really stuck on and how does she fix it? What are some easy traps to fall into and how do I climb back out of them, etc. Heh, I figured sewing in straight lines was a good place to start, but apparently even that can be tricksy :o. I plan to make the epic first step of turning the machine on tonight :thumb:

nijineko
02-17-2009, 05:17 PM
make sure you have both lines threaded. ^^

mrken
02-17-2009, 07:22 PM
Hey, what I really need is for someone to tell me how to make the thread go all the placed it has to go to not turn into a giant knot. Then I need to learn how to turn it on. Once the darn thing is rolling I think I can make it from there. The way I see it is I can sew a straight line, I think, and all lines are straight, more or less. A curve is just a straight line that leans to one side or the other. lol

Grimwell
02-18-2009, 12:34 AM
This woman is awesome. (http://profile.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=user.viewProfile&friendID=36852562)
She is also friendly. Check her work out for inspiration at the very least!

tesral
02-18-2009, 12:43 AM
R.T.F.M.

Best advice that can be given. My wife sews, but isn't on the forum. She even did one professional job that almost paid for the surger.

GoddessGood
02-18-2009, 08:27 AM
Yeah. After standing and looking at the Thing for a while last night, I finally gave in and started reading the manual. Honestly, I might as well be reading a gaming book. The thing is 80 pages long and only about 1/2 that is accounted for by the other languages it's translated into. I managed to get through the section that tells you how to set it up so you can start to sew ... but by that time it was after 10:00 and I have to get up early :ohwell:.

I'd love to check out the link you posted, grim, but myspace is blocked for me :(. Does she have an off-myspace page?

Valdar
02-18-2009, 09:42 AM
Ooh! Can we see a picture?

I have amassed a collection of patterns, mostly Simplicity and McCall's. What I'm really looking for is tricks of the trade. For example, what does Nijineko's wife get really stuck on and how does she fix it? What are some easy traps to fall into and how do I climb back out of them, etc. Heh, I figured sewing in straight lines was a good place to start, but apparently even that can be tricksy :o. I plan to make the epic first step of turning the machine on tonight :thumb:

I'll need to find my camera and my webhosting software, so it may be a while =)

What hung me up for the longest time with sewing was making sure the machine was threaded and cleaned properly- I'd spend hours cutting and ironing pattern pieces, and the damn machine would either a) take a big bite out of the fabric and not let go, b) immediately unthread, or c) sew a mess of "lace" to the back of the seam. Things to watch for:

--If the sewing machine grabs the fabric, you probably have a stray bobbin thread down in the machine that needs to be cleaned out. Take the bobbin assembly apart and clean out any loose threads, lint, bits of fabric, etc.

--If the needle unthreads right away, or sews a mess of loose loops to the back, you either don't have enough tension, or you threaded it with the foot up, or the top thread isn't going through all the hooks and rollers like it's supposed to. When you thread the machine, the foot needs to be down, and the dog (whatever it's called- the big hook inside that goes up and down) has to be at its highest point, and the thread needs to go through it properly.

--Something else that causes problems is an incorrectly wound bobbin. If the bobbin is wound unevenly, or has extra loops or threads sticking out, this can cause problems up to and including breaking your machine. Take your time when winding the bobbin and make sure that you maintain tension on the thread at all times.

The best solution for the above is practice. Thread the machine, sew a few lines in a scrap of fabric, repeat until you've got it down and it's not going to screw up your pattern pieces.

I solved a lot of the above by getting a new, electronic machine. It's got a computer in it that makes sure that when you lift up on the pedal and stop sewing, the machine stops in the perfect position for re-threading each time- with the needle all the way up or all the way down, depending on if the "needle up" button is lit.

I started using invisible thread, thinking it would be easier, but it's not. The stuff is very fine and slick, and I had more problems with it than if I went with a colored thread that matched the fabric (or didn't match- early Medieval clothes sometimes had a contrasting thread as their only decoration...)

Last bit: When rethreading a machine, never pull the thread backward through it- cut it off at the spool, and pull it forward. Otherwise you'll get thread lint all inside the machine where it will be very difficult to get out.

mrken
02-18-2009, 02:37 PM
Hey Valdar, thanks for all those tips. Hope they are relevant for our machine. Gotta get it out now.

GoddessGood
02-18-2009, 03:52 PM
--If the sewing machine grabs the fabric, you probably have a stray bobbin thread down in the machine that needs to be cleaned out. Take the bobbin assembly apart and clean out any loose threads, lint, bits of fabric, etc.
How often do you find you need to clean out the bobbin compartment? Would you say it's a good idea to give it a once over every time you sit down to sew?


--If the needle unthreads right away, or sews a mess of loose loops to the back, you either don't have enough tension, or you threaded it with the foot up, or the top thread isn't going through all the hooks and rollers like it's supposed to. When you thread the machine, the foot needs to be down, and the dog (whatever it's called- the big hook inside that goes up and down) has to be at its highest point, and the thread needs to go through it properly.
Yeah, I was reading in the manual that after threading, it's a good idea to run the needle up and down (with no fabric!) a few times to bring up the bobbin thread and make sure everything is catching properly.


I started using invisible thread, thinking it would be easier, but it's not. The stuff is very fine and slick, and I had more problems with it than if I went with a colored thread that matched the fabric (or didn't match- early Medieval clothes sometimes had a contrasting thread as their only decoration...)
That's a good point. I'd been wondering if clear thread was as much of a pain as it seemed it might be.


Last bit: When rethreading a machine, never pull the thread backward through it- cut it off at the spool, and pull it forward. Otherwise you'll get thread lint all inside the machine where it will be very difficult to get out.
I'm not sure what you mean here? Can you describe it a little more for me? Thanks for all your tips! I really appreciate it :D

Valdar
02-18-2009, 05:16 PM
How often do you find you need to clean out the bobbin compartment? Would you say it's a good idea to give it a once over every time you sit down to sew?


Certainly a lot less than once per session. I'd say at most, less often than rewinding the bobbin. But, when I was sewing a lot of velvet, it was catching a lot, so I wound up cleaning it out several times a session. Bascially I only clean it out when I'm getting fabric sucked down into the bobbin compartment and I have to tear it out, or when I'm feeling particularly industrious...




That's a good point. I'd been wondering if clear thread was as much of a pain as it seemed it might be.


Yeah, it really isn't worth it, unless you get very good at using it. Something else that annoys me is that my new machine has an automatic needle threader, but it doesn't work with invisible nylon because the thread isn't flexible enough... grr...

Works fine with ordinary black thread, though...



I'm not sure what you mean here? Can you describe it a little more for me? Thanks for all your tips! I really appreciate it :D

Basically, when it's time to change out the thread for any reason, it might be tempting to grab the thread where it comes off the spool and pull it out- essentially running the thread backward through the machine. What this will do will cause lint to be pulled off the thread, which will gum up your machine- especially after the thread has broken rather than being cut. What you want to do instead is cut the thread at the spool, and pull it forward through the machine (the direction the thread goes when you're sewing normally)- it wastes a little thread, but it's much better for your machine.

Good luck with your projects!

tesral
02-18-2009, 10:40 PM
Then you have the surger, four needles. I don't touch the thing, it's my wife's toy.

GoddessGood
02-19-2009, 08:35 AM
Basically, when it's time to change out the thread for any reason, it might be tempting to grab the thread where it comes off the spool and pull it out- essentially running the thread backward through the machine. What this will do will cause lint to be pulled off the thread, which will gum up your machine- especially after the thread has broken rather than being cut. What you want to do instead is cut the thread at the spool, and pull it forward through the machine (the direction the thread goes when you're sewing normally)- it wastes a little thread, but it's much better for your machine.

Good luck with your projects!
Thanks! I see what you mean now. I was able to test out some of the functions on my machine last night and discovered that the test fabric I'd bought (cheapy, plain, white, cotton stuff) was way too thin and I had to crank up the thread tension. It also puckers up and just, in general, looked really nasty. I decided to try and make a mini pillowcase with it (easy enough to do without a pattern) and it came out ok. I showed it to my beau and his buddy, who put it on his hand with his fingers in one corner and called it the "KKK sock puppet." :rolleyes:

Valdar
02-19-2009, 11:16 AM
Then you have the surger, four needles. I don't touch the thing, it's my wife's toy.

I need one. I told the guy at the store that I needed a specialized roller foot for sewing spandex (we're doing X-Men costumes for Norwescon), and he looked at me like I was crazy. Apparently nobody sews spandex without a surger.


Thanks! I see what you mean now. I was able to test out some of the functions on my machine last night and discovered that the test fabric I'd bought (cheapy, plain, white, cotton stuff) was way too thin and I had to crank up the thread tension. It also puckers up and just, in general, looked really nasty. I decided to try and make a mini pillowcase with it (easy enough to do without a pattern) and it came out ok. I showed it to my beau and his buddy, who put it on his hand with his fingers in one corner and called it the "KKK sock puppet." :rolleyes:

Stretchy fabric is a pain- the stretchier, the more pain (hence my comment above about spandex). The trick to sewing stretchy fabric without puckering is to use a zig-zag stitch, and try not to stretch it when you sew- if it's stretched when it's stitched, it will un-stretch after and the now-shorter-than-the-fabric thread will cause the puckering.

GoddessGood
02-19-2009, 11:34 AM
The fabric really wasn't that stretchy. I think my my main problem was that I don't have a feel for what tension is needed to sew what fabric ... or maybe I had the wrong size needle or something.

Incidentally, I found a patterns that seems perfect for those fond of Firefly/Serenity. Enjoy, folks. I'll add more as I find 'em.
Men's Duster Coat, Shirt and Scarf (http://www.butterick.com/item/B3830.htm)

Edit:
I did some work on a pattern this weekend. What I'm making is a glorified fleece blanket, two layers of fleece with binding along the endges. It was easy for the most part, except when it came to sewing on the binding. I used double-fold bias tape, and the technique I was told to do is to sew the short side of the binding to the right side of the blanket and then wrap the binding over to the back and sew the seam again. The long side of the binding will be caught "perfectly" with this method, I was told. Here's a video of what I'm talking about.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4fEv3VXPUEs

My problem was that the seam was so large (something like 18 feet all the way around) and that blanket so thick (two layers of anti-pill fleece) that the second pass didn't always catch the back of the binding. I had to stop every inch or so to re-secure the binding on the back. I tried using pins, but since the seam is so small (like half an inch), the foot would get caught on them. In some places I rolled the tape over so far that I have a flap of binding hanging in the breeze. So how do you make bias tape binding look good?

Aeon
02-23-2009, 12:27 PM
My problem was that the seam was so large (something like 18 feet all the way around) and that blanket so thick (two layers of anti-pill fleece) that the second pass didn't always catch the back of the binding. I had to stop every inch or so to re-secure the binding on the back. I tried using pins, but since the seam is so small (like half an inch), the foot would get caught on them. In some places I rolled the tape over so far that I have a flap of binding hanging in the breeze. So how do you make bias tape binding binding look good?

Adding a bias tape binding (or a waistband, or any number of other finishing steps) is just plain difficult when you're adding it to a thick fabric. The only advice I can offer is: Go slow, and check your work as you go. Pinning through several layers of thick fabric can actually move the bottom of your binding around, warping it all askew. I recommend not pinning at all (gasp!) and going very slowly, holding the bias tape around the fabric as you feed it under the needle. Stop every four inches or so and get the next few inches situated with your hands. It's very slow going, but it saves the time of ripping it out over and over in the long run.

As far as sewing basics, I have actually found the Better Homes and Gardens Sewing Book (I got my 1961 edition for about $4 used,) is very helpful for an overview of how to pin garments together, what beginner mistakes to avoid, and translations of pattern lingo. It's pretty dated when it comes to the editorial commentary (the section on adjustments for figure type is a hoot,) but the technical sewing information is just as valuable today. It also has some great tips for more advanced tailoring and couture sewing, and nice diagrams.

GoddessGood
02-23-2009, 12:36 PM
Is this (http://www.amazon.com/Better-Homes-Gardens-Sewing-Book/dp/B000LOIOOE/ref=sr_1_2/178-7403758-2214134?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1235413903&sr=1-2) the one you're referring to? I'm the kind of person who does tons of research before I do anything, so this is sort of flying by the seat of my pants for me :S. Still, I hadn't picked up any books yet and if this one has helped you I'll gladly add it to my collection :)

Aeon
02-23-2009, 12:49 PM
That's exactly the one. It's cheesy in that it's very much aimed at the June Cleaver early 60's types, and some of the more editorial comments clearly predate women's lib, but if you can get past that it's very readable, and virtually all of the technical information is still relevant.

I probably should branch out a little, but it's the only sewing book I own, and it's served me well.

nijineko
02-28-2009, 11:43 PM
almost, i am tempted to learn to improve my sewing skills.

tesral
03-01-2009, 01:53 AM
almost, i am tempted to learn to improve my sewing skills.

Mine have declined along with my eyesight. Seriously, I used to do needlework. Now it's too much effort to thread the damn needle.

GoddessGood
03-01-2009, 09:07 AM
My first project is still, regrettably, on hold due to an ordering mixup at my craft store. I was told that the nylon webbing I wanted could be ordered and would be there by last tuesday ... but apparently it was never ordered :mad:. It's the last thing I need and I've already paid for it, so ...

In the meanwhile, I've been plotting halloween costumes. I found a fun viking queen type number consisting of a laced up bodice with a skirt and sleeves attached and a leather and fur crown. It'd be something I'd have to work up to, but since the only thing needing to be fitted is the bodice, I thought it might not be too hard. Especially since I'll have to lace it up and that'll make the fitting easier.

So to those of you who sew, have any of you ever used grommets or boning (as for a corset) or have any tips for shaping garments?

tesral
03-01-2009, 08:51 PM
This is Tesral's wife. I've got some experience with both items you mention.

1) Grommets - don't use the metal ones, they tend to tear out of the fabric. Make your own right in the fabric. Get yourself an awl, a needle, and some heavy duty thread. Poke the awl thru the fabric where you want the eyelet to be. Make sure you are going between threads (pushing them out of the way) and not breaking threads. Leave the awl sticking thru the fabric - it will keep the eyelet open until you have the thread in place. Thread the needle with heavy-duty thread and anchor it about 1/8"-1/4" outside the awl. Using a backstitch, sew a circle around the awl 1/8"-1/4" away from it. This will give the eyelet a good anchor. Begin whipstiching the eyelet. Bring the thread up thru the fabric just outside the circle you backstitched and down the same hole the awl is keeping open... just poke the needle down thru the hole whilst it is touching the awl. Pull the thread tight then turn the fabric 90 degrees... bring the thread up thru the fabric on the outside of the backstitched circle and down thru the awl hole.... pull the thread tight. Turn the fabric another 90 degrees and repeat. Once you have the cardinal points of the circle stitched begin to fill in the spaces between the first 4 stitches with whipstitches.... up thru the fabric outside the backstitched circle and down thru the awl hole. Eventually, you'll be able to remove the awl and the hole will stay open. Once you have the entire eyelet stitched... anchor your thread and then pass it under the stitching around the eyelet before cutting the thread. One eyelet takes me about 15 minutes to sew and it will NEVER rip out of the fabric unless the fabric itself gives way.

2) Corset - see http://www.elizabethancostume.net/corsets/pattern.html. There is an online pattern generator that you can use to get a perfect fit. I've made a corset from this pattern and found it not too difficult to do.

Good luck!

GoddessGood
03-04-2009, 10:37 AM
This is Tesral's wife. I've got some experience with both items you mention.

1) Grommets - **snip**
Thanks :) I'll have to try that out. Does it work better on certain types of fabric? For instance, leather vs. cotton, etc.?


2) Corset - see http://www.elizabethancostume.net/corsets/pattern.html. There is an online pattern generator that you can use to get a perfect fit. I've made a corset from this pattern and found it not too difficult to do.
This is awesome! Thanks so much :biggrin:

spotlight
03-04-2009, 02:12 PM
'Whew'. I remember watching my mother sewing binding on thick fabric years ago. and, yeah, she had to go very slow and hold it by hand. Unfortunatly, I also saw her sew her fingers several times. No wonder I didn't go into that line of work.

As for the eyelets, that is pretty much the way to do it. My mother used a set of neddles that I later found out were designed to sew leather, not just thick material. I sort of snatch/inheireted them when she passed on.

tesral
03-04-2009, 02:23 PM
Thanks :) I'll have to try that out. Does it work better on certain types of fabric? For instance, leather vs. cotton, etc.?

Well I know she hasn't worked in leather. And I don't recall her ever putting grommets in anything. She made me a bag for my drum and used a zipper.

However I have used grommets. Mainly large ones for camping gear. Yes they work better in thicker material. In fact when making PVC ground cloth and flies for the tent we glued a patch of several layers together whereever we put in a grommet. If I was putting in grommets I would double the cloth over, interfacing, something to stiffen and strengthen the area.

If you are going for historical accuracy metal eyelets or grommets are not the deal.

Warning that my personal background is in modeling and engineering, not clothing design. Given half a chance I would have you sporting flying buttresses and a bell tower.

GoddessGood
03-04-2009, 05:57 PM
Warning that my personal background is in modeling and engineering, not clothing design. Given half a chance I would have you sporting flying buttresses and a bell tower.
:shocked: Most. Awesome. Costume. Evar.

tesral
03-04-2009, 06:47 PM
:shocked: Most. Awesome. Costume. Evar.

We can just call you Cathy Edral.

GoddessGood
03-05-2009, 08:21 AM
*points vehemently to the pun thread* Away with you, sir! ;)

GoddessGood
04-20-2009, 10:36 AM
Sorry to thread necro, but wanted to share the (relative) success of my latest project.

I made a backseat cover for my cats to ride in in hopes that it would curtail the shedding of white fur on black upholstery. It fits ok, could be better, but that's what I get for following the pattern to the letter :). Also, it needs velcro straps because the cats tend to pull back the cover and climb into the footwells to hide.

Things I learned from this project: When you are too exhausted to finish off all the hanging threads, burning them is a viable option :).

tesral
04-20-2009, 12:19 PM
You drive around with your cats in the car?

I found that Zak isn't as stressed if I don't put him in a carrier. We put a leash on him and let him ride in the backseat. He still doesn't like it, but he doesn't howl like he's being killed.

GoddessGood
04-20-2009, 12:37 PM
You drive around with your cats in the car?

I found that Zak isn't as stressed if I don't put him in a carrier. We put a leash on him and let him ride in the backseat. He still doesn't like it, but he doesn't howl like he's being killed.
I have two cats, one who enjoys car rides and one who vehemently does not. No matter what we do, he will yowl and cry until he wears himself out, then sleep. It's especially annoying because it usually takes him about 45 minutes to do so, and the only car trip we tend to take him on (besides the vet) is to my boyfriend's parents house which is about 45 minutes away. So just as we're getting there, he passes out.

We decided to take him to the pet store to show him not all car trips are bad (i.e. they don't last forever and they don't all involve getting washed or probed), but he hyperventilated and we decided to rush him home. For his part, Niko (http://www.penandpapergames.com/forums/album.php?albumid=133&pictureid=638) was a prince and just loved all the attention he got at the pet store.

Sascha
04-20-2009, 01:18 PM
... Niko (http://www.penandpapergames.com/forums/album.php?albumid=133&pictureid=638) ...
Kitty! >^.^<



Ahem.

My sister's cat screamed bloody murder when we moved him to her place, a few years ago; my cat (http://s148.photobucket.com/albums/s36/gray_sascha/?action=view&current=crabhead1.jpg)? Not so much; she took a cross-country move without much noise. She curled up in her bed (the first and only one she's ever taken to, go figure), or found a place at my feet.

spotlight
04-22-2009, 02:21 PM
Love the cats. Don't forget to post them in the photog section, please. That way it's easier to find them when I need something relaxing to look at.