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tesral
12-15-2008, 01:04 PM
Place you character application here.

boulet
12-18-2008, 08:33 AM
I'm interested by the game. I need a couple of days to shape up a character concept. I think it would be along the lines of a man who is a knight out of family tradition and respect for his parents. He accepted his obligation with dignity and solemnity, but his heart is with the Church and he struggled with a rebellious impulse commanding him to join a monastery. I'd like him to have been a pilgrim on the road to Santiago de Compostella. Probably it was a sanction for a youth sin or scandal. I picture a character who is certainly not the most impressive knight around but one who visited several countries and whose intellect is a bit out of place in his own entourage. He may be of the "holier than thou" kind.

tesral
12-18-2008, 09:52 AM
Go for it. I might have a a little older than the rest as well.

Windrider687
12-20-2008, 09:53 AM
I'm interested; I'm not sure I'll be able to craft up a character to your liking...I'm going to have to refresh myself a bit on my history as well...

...I was thinking of trying to make a knight from Ireland, beyond that I'm not sure which way I would take it, either the overt loyalist, jockeying for an eventual governership of land over his countrymen, or a quiet knight that was from a typically rebellious clan, but some submitted to the rule of the crown and were tossed a bone by getting a minor fief, and thus one of their number (my character) was granted this experimental 'Irish knighthood'; this character would not necessarily be loyal to the king, but he isn't loud about it, he has his own personal code that he lives by, which is much guided by his beliefs in Christianity. Either way, the character is seen as a 'bastard' knight, not deserving of the title.

It will need work, or a total revision I'm sure, but figured I'd throw it out there anyway.

tesral
12-21-2008, 10:47 AM
I'm interested; I'm not sure I'll be able to craft up a character to your liking...I'm going to have to refresh myself a bit on my history as well...

...I was thinking of trying to make a knight from Ireland, beyond that I'm not sure which way I would take it, either the overt loyalist, jockeying for an eventual governership of land over his countrymen, or a quiet knight that was from a typically rebellious clan, but some submitted to the rule of the crown and were tossed a bone by getting a minor fief, and thus one of their number (my character) was granted this experimental 'Irish knighthood'; this character would not necessarily be loyal to the king, but he isn't loud about it, he has his own personal code that he lives by, which is much guided by his beliefs in Christianity. Either way, the character is seen as a 'bastard' knight, not deserving of the title.

It will need work, or a total revision I'm sure, but figured I'd throw it out there anyway.


Shrewsbury is right on the Welsh border, and considering that Wales was subdued only recently by Edward 1, His son Edward II was supposedly the First "Prince of Wales" "A prince born in Wales and speaking no English." (The legend is questioned historically, the Nobility of the time spoke Norman French, and the title is older than that.)

That taken into consideration might I suggest that Welsh be substituted for Irish. It would be more likely considering both the time and the location. He would have to be respected enough by The Earl to be Knighted, but Welshmen were considered somewhat barbaric by the English and certainly the Norman descended nobility. He would not be considered a "bastard" within the Earl's household, but given a good Welsh name and habits any other English knight would look upon him as strangely as if he came from Borneo.

Bearfoot_Adam
12-24-2008, 08:50 PM
Well here it is. I feel like it's about 4/5ths of an idea Let me know what you think and if there are any changes you would like to see.

Sir Colwyn in the service of the Earl of Shropshire



Charles, a spice merchant in the borough of Liverpool, was looking forward to nobility. Cinnamons, cloves, and nutmeg were his currency into the world of the landed gentry. If spices were his money then Rhea was his chief investment. A family of country nobles, Rhea’s father, like many of the elite, was name rich and cash poor. A deal was arranged, the family debts were paid, and a marriage took place. The result of that marriage was Colwyn Peter. Colwyn was always a large strong child resembling his maternal grandfather more than his sly frail father. He had a quick mind but was shy and slow to speak. Many felt he might be touched in the head but he was merely cautious with his words. As the first son Colwyn was taught in the ways of his fathers business. He learned to read and figure sums. Colwyn was fascinated by numbers. He loved to determine how much food would be required for a voyage to Lisbon in spring. It would have been his greatest joy to stay in his father’s house in Liverpool and run the family business. But this was not to be. To ensure his place in the gentry Charles sent his 14 year old son of to squire for a knight in the court of Earl of Shropshire, who governed over the lands of Colwyn’s family. It was under the tutelage of Sir Paul that Colwyn learned the manly arts of swordplay, wrestling, archery, and riding. The following two years were the worst of Colwyn’s life. Despite the fact that he would have rather been looking over shipping inventories, Sir Paul was the most despicable, drunken, retch Colwyn had ever met. A dirty man and a dirtier fighter Colwyn would often have to tie the man to his horse after a night of drink and debauchery. Sir Paul would often comment at great length on Colwyn’s oafishness making any attempt at courtship with a lady nigh impossible. In spite of all his faults Colwyn was able to learn much in his six years with Sir Paul. On his twentieth year Colwyn kept vigil in the church asking God for courage and prosperity as he served his liege. He had many gifts to take with him, the brain of his father, his strength from his mother, and the skill of Sir Paul.

tesral
12-24-2008, 10:56 PM
On his twentieth year Colwyn kept vigil in the church asking God for courage and prosperity as he served his liege. He had many gifts to take with him, the brain of his father, his strength from his mother, and the skill of Sir Paul.

Looks good and thank you for the NPC. Roll your stats and post the results here. A basic sheet for follow: Standard 4d6 drop the lowest. Remember do not take any feats that are dependant on mini placement. If you have questions on feats, or anything else, ask.

Name
Race: Gender
Height: Weight:
Hair:
Eyes: Complexion:
Build:



Class level
Str: HP: Mass:
Con: AC:
Dex:
Int: BAB:
Wis: Fort:
Cha: Reflex:
Psi: Will:






Weapons & Items:




Comments: What you have written so far goes here

Sir Paul DeOnover -- Many have questioned why God permits such a profane man to live. But it is not God's mercy that keeps him alive, but a good right arm and a skill at arms drunk that most men would envy sober. Sir Paul is the Master at Arms for the Earl of Shropshire. It is he that is responsible to teach the young men to be knights, and for all his sinful faults none will fault him for inattention to duty.

Bearfoot_Adam
12-24-2008, 11:42 PM
Well here are the stats. Not the best I've rolled. But then I recall that I've always rolled lousy on computers. Thankfully you'll be doing that from here on out. IF only I could infuse my computer with my blue dice. Only question I have is on equipment and if costs are going to be the same

Name; Sir Colwyn
Race: Human Gender: Male
Height:5'6 Weight: 170 lb
Hair: Black
Eyes: Hazel Complexion: Pale
Build: Average



Class level
Str:11 HP:10 Mass:
Con:11 AC:
Dex: 10
Int: 16 BAB: 1
Wis:10 Fort: 2
Cha:9 Reflex: 0
Psi: Will: 0

Feats:
Mounted Combat
Combat Expertise
Skill Focus (Appraise)

Skills: 24

Profession: Merchant 2
Ride: 4
Literacy: 1
Appraise:2+3
Language: Welch, English
Swim:2
Climb:2
Handle Animal:4
Intimidate:2






Weapons & Items:
Wasn't sure if you were using standard gold prices for equipment.




Comments: Charles, a spice merchant in the borough of Liverpool, was looking forward to nobility. Cinnamons, cloves, and nutmeg were his currency into the world of the landed gentry. If spices were his money then Rhea was his chief investment. A family of country nobles, Rhea’s father, like many of the elite, was name rich and cash poor. A deal was arranged, the family debts were paid, and a marriage took place. The result of that marriage was Colwyn Peter. Colwyn was always a large strong child resembling his maternal grandfather more than his sly frail father. He had a quick mind but was shy and slow to speak. Many felt he might be touched in the head but he was merely cautious with his words. As the first son Colwyn was taught in the ways of his fathers business. He learned to read and figure sums. Colwyn was fascinated by numbers. He loved to determine how much food would be required for a voyage to Lisbon in spring. It would have been his greatest joy to stay in his father’s house in Liverpool and run the family business. But this was not to be. To ensure his place in the gentry Charles sent his 14 year old son of to squire for a knight in the court of Earl of Shropshire, who governed over the lands of Colwyn’s family. It was under the tutelage of Sir Paul that Colwyn learned the manly arts of swordplay, wrestling, archery, and riding. The following two years were the worst of Colwyn’s life. Despite the fact that he would have rather been looking over shipping inventories, Sir Paul was the most despicable, drunken, retch Colwyn had ever met. A dirty man and a dirtier fighter Colwyn would often have to tie the man to his horse after a night of drink and debauchery. Sir Paul would, nightly, comment at great length on Colwyn’s oafishness making any attempt at courtship with a lady nigh impossible. In spite of all his faults Colwyn was able to learn much in his six years with Sir Paul. On his twentieth year Colwyn kept vigil in the church asking God for courage and prosperity as he served his liege. He had many gifts to take with him, the brain of his father, his strength from his mother, and the skill of Sir Paul.

tesral
12-25-2008, 02:57 PM
DM Comments: OK, I rerolled a couple of your stats on the really random dice (casino grade) to your improvement. Computer rollers are only as random as the seed. The sword, armor and horse are gifts from your Lord on you knighthood. This PDF Money and Equipment (http://phoenixinn.iwarp.com/fantasy/fantpdf/06_Manual_Money&Equipment.pdf) is closer to the reality of the day prices wise. Your father is rich so you get normal starting money in gold. Some of the higher tech items are not available in England such as watches. Sextants and compasses are not available period as are any optics but the simplest and crudest of lenses. Silk is ten times the price listed. Wool and linen normal price and cotton cannot be had.

I added Latin because to be taught to read and write you pretty much need to be taught in a church school. Likewise math is a DM freebie.

"Mass" is massive damage. Every level you gain 4 points on you massive damage roll. That is the point at which you are dead if you take it from one hit. For your first couple of levels it is moot point. "Psi" I will not be using so I removed it.

You can now sit around, practice wench and drink until the other knights show up.

As of course any questions ask.


Name; Sir Colwyn
Human, Male
Height:5'6 Weight: 170 lb
Hair: Black
Eyes: Hazel Complexion: Pale
Build: Average


Fighter 1


Str: 15 +2 HP:12 Mass:18
Con: 14 +2 AC:16
Dex: 10 +0
Int: 16 +3 BAB: 1
Wis: 10 +0 Fort: +4 2 +2
Cha: 9 -1 Reflex: +0 0 +0
Will: +0 0 +0
Feats:
Mounted Combat
Combat Expertise
Skill Focus (Appraise)

Skills: 24
Profession: Merchant 2
Ride: 4
Literacy: 1
Math: 1
Appraise:2+3
Language: Welsh, English, Latin
Swim:2
Climb:2
Handle Animal:4
Intimidate:2

Weapons & Items:
Longsword 1d8
Banded Mail AC +6
Heavy War horse.
Income from two hides. = 10 silver pennies a month net.

Comments: Charles, a spice merchant in the borough of Liverpool, was looking forward to nobility. Cinnamons, cloves, and nutmeg were his currency into the world of the landed gentry. If spices were his money then Rhea was his chief investment. A family of country nobles, Rhea’s father, like many of the elite, was name rich and cash poor. A deal was arranged, the family debts were paid, and a marriage took place. The result of that marriage was Colwyn Peter. Colwyn was always a large strong child resembling his maternal grandfather more than his sly frail father. He had a quick mind but was shy and slow to speak. Many felt he might be touched in the head but he was merely cautious with his words. As the first son Colwyn was taught in the ways of his fathers business. He learned to read and figure sums. Colwyn was fascinated by numbers. He loved to determine how much food would be required for a voyage to Lisbon in spring. It would have been his greatest joy to stay in his father’s house in Liverpool and run the family business. But this was not to be. To ensure his place in the gentry Charles sent his 14 year old son of to squire for a knight in the court of Earl of Shropshire, who governed over the lands of Colwyn’s family. It was under the tutelage of Sir Paul that Colwyn learned the manly arts of swordplay, wrestling, archery, and riding. The following two years were the worst of Colwyn’s life. Despite the fact that he would have rather been looking over shipping inventories, Sir Paul was the most despicable, drunken, retch Colwyn had ever met. A dirty man and a dirtier fighter Colwyn would often have to tie the man to his horse after a night of drink and debauchery. Sir Paul would, nightly, comment at great length on Colwyn’s oafishness making any attempt at courtship with a lady nigh impossible. In spite of all his faults Colwyn was able to learn much in his six years with Sir Paul. On his twentieth year Colwyn kept vigil in the church asking God for courage and prosperity as he served his liege. He had many gifts to take with him, the brain of his father, his strength from his mother, and the skill of Sir Paul.

Bearfoot_Adam
12-28-2008, 03:48 AM
Name; Sir Colwyn
Human, Male
Height:5'6 Weight: 170 lb
Hair: Black
Eyes: Hazel Complexion: Pale
Build: Large in the chest with a broad stance and a well fed stomach


Fighter 1


Str: 15 +2 HP:12 Mass:18
Con: 14 +2 AC:16
Dex: 10 +0
Int: 16 +3 BAB: 1
Wis: 10 +0 Fort: +4 2 +2
Cha: 9 -1 Reflex: +0 0 +0
Will: +0 0 +0
Feats:
Mounted Combat
Combat Expertise
Skill Focus (Appraise)

Skills: 24
Profession: Merchant 2
Ride: 4
Literacy: 1
Math: 1
Appraise:2+3
Language: Welsh, English, Latin
Swim:2
Climb:2
Handle Animal:4
Intimidate:2

Weapons & Items: (from 150gp) (82 gold 3 Silver 3 copper)
Longsword 1d8
War hammer 1d8
Dagger 1d4
Banded Mail AC +6
Heavy Wooden Shield AC+2
Heavy War horse.
Bit and Bridle
riding saddle
Large saddle Bags *2
Saddle Blanket
Small Tent
Riding Boots
Belt
Large belt pouch
Grey wool Cloak & pin
Linen Tunic *2
Wool Tunic *2
Wool Breeches *2
Wool Surcoat
Linen underwear *2
Wool Vest
Signet Ring
Writing Ink
Paper *5
Merchants scales

Income from two hides. = 10 silver pennies a month net.

Comments: Charles, a spice merchant in the borough of Liverpool, was looking forward to nobility. Cinnamons, cloves, and nutmeg were his currency into the world of the landed gentry. If spices were his money then Rhea was his chief investment. A family of country nobles, Rhea’s father, like many of the elite, was name rich and cash poor. A deal was arranged, the family debts were paid, and a marriage took place. The result of that marriage was Colwyn Peter. Colwyn was always a large strong child resembling his maternal grandfather more than his sly frail father. He had a quick mind but was shy and slow to speak. Many felt he might be touched in the head but he was merely cautious with his words. As the first son Colwyn was taught in the ways of his fathers business. He learned to read and figure sums. Colwyn was fascinated by numbers. He loved to determine how much food would be required for a voyage to Lisbon in spring. It would have been his greatest joy to stay in his father’s house in Liverpool and run the family business. But this was not to be. To ensure his place in the gentry Charles sent his 14 year old son of to squire for a knight in the court of Earl of Shropshire, who governed over the lands of Colwyn’s family. It was under the tutelage of Sir Paul that Colwyn learned the manly arts of swordplay, wrestling, archery, and riding. The following two years were the worst of Colwyn’s life. Despite the fact that he would have rather been looking over shipping inventories, Sir Paul was the most despicable, drunken, retch Colwyn had ever met. A dirty man and a dirtier fighter Colwyn would often have to tie the man to his horse after a night of drink and debauchery. Sir Paul would, nightly, comment at great length on Colwyn’s oafishness making any attempt at courtship with a lady nigh impossible. In spite of all his faults Colwyn was able to learn much in his six years with Sir Paul. On his twentieth year Colwyn kept vigil in the church asking God for courage and prosperity as he served his liege. He had many gifts to take with him, the brain of his father, his strength from his mother, and the skill of Sir Paul.

wizarddog
01-11-2009, 12:22 PM
Dear Tesral,
Here is a PC concept I have for the game.


Edmond de Segrave, fictional twin brother of John de Segrave (who died in 1349) parents are Sir John de Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave and Margret, Duchess of Norfolk who has the Title of Lord Marshal.

Segrave of course was not the favorite of the twins; born on the same day as the Moon was in the house of Gemini; a clear sign of trouble to come. The two were similar in appearance but different in manner. John's brief fill of life was full of interest in athletics and adventure while Edmond was more withdrawn and looked to his books and the church for guidance.

After his death (age 9), Edward's was thrust into the role his brother would have played and learned to use sword and horse like any other knight while his true love lay in books and stories. While in the circles of very powerful person in relations, Edmond is a ghostly shadow to the his beloved brother and the family grew distance to him.

Sent away to serve in his Great Uncle, Sir Roger Hayles, the coroner of Norfolk, a title that held a different meaning in the 14th century than it does today; his post demanded that he collect and protect revenues for the king.

Edmond now serves the current holder of that title. His father has since died and his mother has remarried.

tesral
01-14-2009, 10:47 AM
Dear Tesral,
Here is a PC concept I have for the game.


Edmond de Segrave, fictional twin brother of John de Segrave (who died in 1349) parents are Sir John de Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave and Margret, Duchess of Norfolk who has the Title of Lord Marshal.


Keep in mind that all characters are Knights of the Earl of Stropshire. A county on the Welsh border. The chief city of which is Shrewbury an important trading center on the River Severn

wizarddog
01-14-2009, 11:09 PM
Here is an updated PC concept. I would like to have him page with Sir Roger Hayles so he works with the Coroner. His focus would be on Gathering information and Sense motive. His ending service would be under the Earl of Stropshire.


Edmond de Alberico, twin brother of John de de Alberico of Sir John de de Alberico, who's family has served in one way or another in capacity of tax collection for the County .

Edmond of course was not the favorite of the twins; born on the same day as the Moon was in the house of Gemini; a clear sign of trouble to come. The two were similar in appearance but different in manner. John's brief fill of life was full of interest in athletics and adventure while Edmond was more withdrawn and looked to his books and the church for guidance.

After his death (age 9), Edward's was thrust into the role his brother would have played and was sent away to page and squire under Sir Roger Hayles, the coroner of Norfolk, a title that held a different meaning in the 14th century than it does today; his post demanded that he collect and protect revenues for the king. While in the circles of very powerful person in relations, Edmond is a ghostly shadow to the his brother.

Upon his knighthood he returned into service of the Earl of Stropshire continuing his families work protecting the revenues of the county.

tesral
01-16-2009, 09:04 AM
OK, give me a stat up and a story background based on that. Standard 3.5 core, avoid feats that require exact mini placement, we don't have any. And no magic.

wizarddog
01-16-2009, 07:18 PM
wizarddog rolls a bunch of dice

Follow the formatting seen in Corwyn's sheet and go for it. SRD20 (http://www.d20srd.org/index.htm)is your best resource. Place the numbers as you see fit.

wizarddog
01-17-2009, 05:38 PM
Name; Sir Edmond de Alberico
Human, Male
Height:5'6 Weight: 120 lb
Hair: Brown
Eyes: Green Complexion: Pale
Build: slim

Fighter 1
Code:
Str: 13 +1 HP:9 Mass: 4
Con: 9 -1 AC:18
Dex: 12 +1
Int: 14 +2 BAB: 1
Wis: 14 +2 Fort: +1 2 -1
Cha: 8 -1 Reflex: +1 0 +1
Will: +2 0 +2
Feats:
Mounted Combat
Skill Focus (Sense Motive)
Skill Focus (Profession Tax Collector)

Skills: 20
Profession: Tax Collector 2+2+3
Ride: 2
Literacy: 1
Math: 1
Knowledge (nobility and royalty) 1
Knowledge (local) 1
Language: French, English, Latin
Handle Animal:2-1
Sense Motive 2+5

Weapons & Items:
Long Sword
Chainmail +5 AC
Heavy Wooden Shield +2 AC
War Horse

(Need some idea on total equip costs and starting money)



Comments: Edmond de Alberico, twin brother of John de de Alberico of Sir John de de Alberico, who's family has served in one way or another in capacity of tax collection for the County .

Edmond of course was not the favorite of the twins; born on the same day as the Moon was in the house of Gemini; a clear sign of trouble to come. The two were similar in appearance but different in manner. John's brief fill of life was full of interest in athletics and adventure while Edmond was more withdrawn and looked to his books and the church for guidance.

After his death (age 9), Edward's was thrust into the role his brother would have played and was sent away to page and squire under Sir Roger Hayles, the coroner of Norfolk, a title that held a different meaning in the 14th century than it does today; his post demanded that he collect and protect revenues for the king. While in the circles of very powerful person in relations, Edmond is a ghostly shadow to the his brother.

Upon his knighthood he returned into service of the Earl of Stropshire continuing his families work protecting the revenues of the county.

tesral
01-18-2009, 07:41 AM
OK, two things. Add a sword. All knights had a sword even if they preferred a cruncher, its part of the uniform, like your spurs.

Second, no reason to know Welsh. Trade out for French. Far more likely given the background.

Other than that it might take a few moves to work you in.