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Soft Serve
12-08-2008, 02:31 PM
I just read some of his stories and I love it.

The Reanimator is amazing!

and Call of Cthulhu is about twice as incredible as everyones said it is.

I didn't get to read too much into Dagon, or Nyarlathotep? (idk if I spelled that right it's a guess...) I only got to at my friends house while he was asleep. I can't wait to buy his books for myself though, I probably won't put them down for a long long time.

I'm not so sure about the necronomicon though. Like nobody can really tell me what it is.



EDIT: now that I think about it this might belong in general discussion...well if it gets moved thats ok.

Mindbomb
12-08-2008, 02:46 PM
I actually just picked up Arkham Horror from Fantasy Flight Games and I absolutely love it, especially how they've adapted everything from Lovecraft so well.

http://new.fantasyflightgames.com/edge_minisite.asp?eidm=6&enmi=Arkham%20Horror

Soft Serve
12-08-2008, 03:17 PM
That looks amazing!

I want it now...


I can't really play to many bord games with my usual group though since we play between two different states online.

MortonStromgal
12-08-2008, 03:45 PM
its a great single player board game (yes you can play it with 1 player)

Soft Serve
12-08-2008, 03:53 PM
Wait how does that work?

Like you can play any board game by yourself if you try hard enough, but this one is designed that way?

Webhead
12-08-2008, 05:37 PM
H.P. Lovecraft is a master of horror story-telling. One of my favorites of his Mythos stories is the very first one I ever read: The Temple. Read it. Very good.

The Necronomicon is perhaps the most prolific and often misunderstood creation of Lovecraft. The book is entirely fictional, introduced by Lovecraft through his stories and consequently cross-polinated into virtually every corner of horror fiction since. According to Lovecraft's original conception of the book, it was written by Abdul Al-Hazrad, the "Mad Arab" and is a collection of insane insights, terrible rituals and other occult knowledge "man was not meant to know".

From my understanding, the Arkham Horror board game can indeed be played solo. Arkham Horror is unusual in its design in that the players work together against the game rather than competing against each other. The concept is that eldritch horrors are descending upon Arkham and the players have to stop them. By the end of the game, either the players are successful and save humanity, or the players fail and are consumed by the chaos and insanity of the emerging Great Old One (each time you play, a random Great Old One is drawn to determine which one is trying to destroy reality).

It's a game I really want to pick up, and may end up doing so shortly. From every indication, it is virtually an RPG in boardgame form. :)

Soft Serve
12-08-2008, 06:11 PM
like that old game I played...uhm...I think Dungeon Quest or something?

fmitchell
12-08-2008, 06:34 PM
The Necronomicon is perhaps the most prolific and often misunderstood creation of Lovecraft. The book is entirely fictional, introduced by Lovecraft through his stories and consequently cross-polinated into virtually every corner of horror fiction since. According to Lovecraft's original conception of the book, it was written by Abdul Al-Hazrad, the "Mad Arab" and is a collection of insane insights, terrible rituals and other occult knowledge "man was not meant to know".

Which didn't keep various parties from publishing a mishmash of badly translated Babylonian texts, theosophical gobbledygook, and necessary quotes from Lovecraft as The Necronomicon.

Unless the work before you violates your every assumption about the Universe and reduces you to a shrieking madperson, it's not the real Necronomicon. Accept no substitutes!

Mindbomb
12-08-2008, 06:54 PM
Arkham Horror is designed to be able to be played solo, although I think you'll find yourself playing 3 or 4 investigators in order to even have a chance at winning(lol). It's fun either way but admittedly the battle of which bad decisions you should make is more fun with others(as with any game I believe). There are 16 different investigators with their own backgrounds and motivations and 12(I think)different Ancient Ones along with other minor monsters for gameplay. If you add in all the expansions you'll have 40 investigators and 24 different Ancient Ones which each make for a different experience every time you play. It really seems almost limitless with all the options they've made available although it is a hefty bit of jink for all the options but I think that the basic game will keep me happy for a good long while before I need to consider all the other options available to me.

Soft Serve
12-08-2008, 11:36 PM
I like to have everything all at once, lol.

So like is it all based on die rolls and strategic movement like Risk or something?

MinipainterUS
12-09-2008, 08:53 AM
I like to have everything all at once, lol.

So like is it all based on die rolls and strategic movement like Risk or something?The thumbnail version:
Dimensional gates are opening in Arkham. When enough gates open, the Great Old One appears, and Arkham is pretty much doomed. Fighting the GOO is usually a very bad thing. :lol: The investigators each start the game with their own set of resources (money, weapons, skills, spells,etc) and spend their time gathering more resources, killing monsters in the streets and closing dimensional gates. The ultimate objective is to close all open gates and stop the GOO from waking. Much of the investigator success is controlled by the outcome of die rolls, and there are ways to maximize your odds at success by rolling more dice.

Each turn has a "Mythos Phase" where the placement of gates, strange events and monster actions are dictated by the rules of the game rather than by die roll or random chance.

It is possible to play it solo by playing multiple investigators, but cooperative play with 4 - 8 players is a riot. This game comes as close to a classic CoC investigation as anything I've seen outside the actual RPG.

Etarnon
12-12-2008, 11:23 AM
The necronomicon is a great read, with lots of easy to use diagrams. At one time, I had two copies. I rebound the worst copy, and have used it in the past as a prop for CoC games.

It's also a handy backup when those pesky tentacles come up out of the floor grates. When the cats start running and the ears go flat, we know it's either something from Beyond Space and Time, or a renegade from LV-426.

Webhead
12-12-2008, 11:35 AM
...or a renegade from LV-426.

Gorman: "All we know is that there's still no contact with the colony and that the Xenomorph may be involved."

Frost: "I'm sorry, sir. A what?"

Gorman: "A Xenomorph."

Mindbomb
12-12-2008, 07:07 PM
I like to have everything all at once, lol.

So like is it all based on die rolls and strategic movement like Risk or something?


It is based on rolls but if you're used to most rpg rolling this will seem VERY strange to you as it did to me at first. Almost everything in the game gives you modifiers to your rolls, however the modifier is the number of dice extra/less that you roll and not an addition to the numbers you rolled. Everything is either a success (on a 5 or 6 on a 6-sided or a 4,5,6 if you've somehow managed to get blessed or only a 6 if you unluckily become cursed) or a failure and the more you're able to roll, the better. The rules can be extremely confusing just by reading through them but once you start to put them into play it's really very easy and a lot of fun.

Soft Serve
12-15-2008, 09:01 AM
I saw it at a game store... Is itworth $50??

Webhead
12-15-2008, 10:18 AM
I saw it at a game store... Is itworth $50??

I've not played it yet myself but I plan to get it. From all the reviews and indications I've heard, if you like meaty board games with a hint of role playing and/or Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos, Arkham Horror is well worth the price. It's about the most board game you can get for your money. I mean, the game comes with over 600 pieces!

If you want further reviews of the game, check out RPG.net or Boardgamegeek.com.

Mindbomb
12-16-2008, 06:43 PM
Worth every bit of the $50 price tag. I paid it and plan on buying some expansions throughout the next year. Out of the 10 or so people (some not even gamers)that have played with me everyone agrees and always looks forward to the next game. As a matter of fact, after they've played the first game we usually go right into a second and sometimes even a third if it's not to late.

Soft Serve
12-17-2008, 04:51 AM
Dayum I better put that on my wish list fast. lol yay christmas!


I found a site with all of Lovecrafts writings for free right there and it's been about the only site I visit now.

I still can't finish Dagon...lol

Total Nerd v2.135 (final)
12-17-2008, 02:24 PM
I definitely went through an HP Lovecraft phase when I was ..16?

I read his short stories so much I would actually find myself writing or talking in that sort of romantic victorian-horror parlance.

I love that sort of Poe-Lovecraft lugubrious romantic 19th century goth prose

Soft Serve
12-17-2008, 03:56 PM
I'm very proud of myself in this phase as well, I completely relate...being 17 myself I apparenly picked the best time. :D

Webhead
12-17-2008, 05:05 PM
I'm very proud of myself in this phase as well, I completely relate...being 17 myself I apparenly picked the best time. :D

I guess, relatively speaking, I got a late start. I had heard of Lovecraft at various times throughout my teenage years, but I wasn't properly exposed to his work until I was almost out of college. That was when my interest with his writings and Mythos began accompanied by a desire to have the role playing game adorning my shelf. Now I own several of his Mythos collections and both the BRP (5th ed.) and d20 version of the game.

Soft Serve
12-17-2008, 07:51 PM
haha I'm getting there. Step by step and little by little I am getting there.

Total Nerd v2.135 (final)
12-18-2008, 12:52 AM
one of the creepy cool thing about his mythos is that Lovecraft always referenced real mythologies and ancient deities (I think Dagon was a real Mesopotamian / Semitic / Persian deity often depicted as a serpent) and all sorts of people over the past ~90 years have subtly expanded his mythos by making references back to Lovecrafts works. Another fascinating Memeverse

GoddessGood
12-18-2008, 10:37 AM
I was turned off of H.P. Lovecraft by several factors, one being my gothy, emo highschool friend thought it was teh awesome(!) so I was understandable skeptical. The other was that I was, at the time, a practicing wiccan and the whole Necronomicon thing was what I was trying to get away from as a "good witch." Now that I'm older and wiser, I might just pick it up. It's been a while since I had a good nightmare :).

Webhead
12-18-2008, 12:02 PM
I was turned off of H.P. Lovecraft by several factors, one being my gothy, emo highschool friend thought it was teh awesome(!) so I was understandable skeptical. The other was that I was, at the time, a practicing wiccan and the whole Necronomicon thing was what I was trying to get away from as a "good witch." Now that I'm older and wiser, I might just pick it up. It's been a while since I had a good nightmare :).

Yes, I have a friend who has similarly chosen to distance himself from Lovecraft's work for similar reasons. The tragedy in that is that those kinds of people don't generally reflect the value of his work.

I am not and never was, even in the the most casually remote sense, goth or emo, nor do those mentalities hold any appeal for me. I enjoy Lovecraft's stories for the haunting chills and the bizarrely "alien" mystery about them. In both his language and his plots, there is a permeating sense of fear, which Lovecraft regarded as the most potent of all human emotions. This is especially punctuated by the fact that most of his protagonists are highly intelligent people...an emphasis that even the greatest and most sophisticated of human minds are so utterly vulnerable to being crushed beneath the weight of the "cosmic truth" that exists just beyond the veil of humanity's blissful, self-absorbed ignorance.

I digress, I recommend reading at least a few of the shorter stories (perhaps The Temple or Rats in the Walls). As you say, they make for great chills when reading at night or alone and if nothing else, you'll have a broader perspective on horror literature and its tropes.

Oh yeah, and the Necronomicon isn't real, Lovecraft invented it for his stories. Yes, there have since been books published by that name but it was originally just a plot device that Lovecraft cooked up.

Soft Serve
12-18-2008, 08:40 PM
I can't wait to read the Necronomicon. My friend is getting it so I'm going to borrow it from him when he's done with it.


I might run around town with it and pretend to cast some evil spells on people too...This town has too many churches in it, and if they can ring that damn bell at 4 in the morning I can make people scared as shit.:D

Total Nerd v2.135 (final)
12-19-2008, 03:52 AM
yeah, where I went to school, you were either goth, emo, or both. There were also people who were so nihilistic that they didn't even care enough about their existence to make such an effort as to affect some sort of style or cultural attitude.

but it had nothing to do with what sort of literature we enjoyed. There were the Jane Austen / Tolstoy / Dostoevsky people, the Tom Clancy people, The Toni Morrison people, the Tolkien people, the Gabriel García Márquez people, and the Anarchists Cookbook people. The cliques. I moved about.

But if you raised your hands in the hall and said
"Ia Ia" or "Cthulhu Fthagn" people would grin approvingly
--- Merged from Double Post ---

I can't wait to read the Necronomicon. My friend is getting it so I'm going to borrow it from him when he's done with it.


I thought that was a fictitious text, but I may be wrong. Im sure some person wrote one in the 90s.

Etarnon
12-19-2008, 06:31 AM
lol, in my school there were the D&D players, and the people that spent lunch in the library, the sports teams, the chess club, and band, and the largest bunch were the NPCs that walked around, dodging homework, and tests on fridays by being sick.



How things do change.

GoddessGood
12-19-2008, 10:09 AM
I might run around town with it and pretend to cast some evil spells on people too...This town has too many churches in it, and if they can ring that damn bell at 4 in the morning I can make people scared as shit.:D

A priestess once told me that if you don't burst into flames the moment you enter a church, it just proves them wrong. I often pondered wearing nomex under my clothing somehow and running, screaming through the narthex while on fire.


But if you raised your hands in the hall and said
"Ia Ia" or "Cthulhu Fthagn" people would grin approvingly
Yeah, the same happened with us and "Ni!" or "What is the airborne velocity of an unladen swallow?" This reminds me of another joke a pastor told me once. How do you know the methodists in a sci-fi convention? You call out "The Force be with you!" and they answer "And also with you!"

The Methodists in the room will get it :).

Webhead
12-19-2008, 01:02 PM
...How do you know the methodists in a sci-fi convention? You call out "The Force be with you!" and they answer "And also with you!"...

Peter: Let us "Eh!".

(chorus of voices): Eh!

Peter: Fonzie be with you.

(chorus of voices): And also with you.

Total Nerd v2.135 (final)
12-19-2008, 02:38 PM
lol, in my school there were the D&D players, and the people that spent lunch in the library, the sports teams, the chess club, and band, and the largest bunch were the NPCs that walked around, dodging homework, and tests on fridays by being sick.

How things do change.

LOVE the way you describe those people as NPCs!!!

they are so NPCs lol!

No, things have not changed so much. I just went to a unusual public school. Every school has some variation of a caste system, even colleges.
Its sad because I would hear kids express their hopes for a better more enlightened and friendly environment in college, and knew they would be disappointed.

the dc area is weird.

In the DC area, there are two types of public schools, those where you will get shot or stabbed by others, and those where you will shoot or stab yourself for not getting a 5.0 on your 7 annual AP exams, because of your insurmountable guilt and feelings of inadequacy and failure and not living up to the lofty expectations of your Lobbyist / Senior Executive Service / Brilliant DOD contractor parents.

But both of these schools are populated by hyperliterate children who are under constant stress and have minimal contact with their families.
crack dealers read Tolkien and Tolstoy, and why shouldn't they? great stuff

Soft Serve
12-20-2008, 03:31 AM
I wish my schools would have taught some people to read...

All I have here are hunters, drinkers, and smokers...


I dress normally (for me) and people ostracize me, and act like they've never seen it before.

I wish people would know who Lovecraft is around me. I WISH...I would donate a penny to my mall fountain for this one...I really would.


I thought that was a fictitious text, but I may be wrong. Im sure some person wrote one in the 90s.

yep...The author was Mr. Lovecraft himself, but he wrote it as a plot advancing technique, and not as a ritual, demon-y, book the way it's famous for today.

Total Nerd v2.135 (final)
12-20-2008, 12:52 PM
Lovecraft wrote it!!! awesome! I need to get one, if only to have it on a bookshelf or open, heavily dog-eared and ancient, sitting atop a lugubrious marble rostrum or sacristy.

and I need to have those astrogram circles of summoning everywhere

My friend Dan Barrett draws the cthulhu circles and glyphs on his monastic DJ robes whenever he plays or DJs (baltimore dark noise ambient scene)

http://userserve-ak.last.fm/serve/252/3023689.jpg

I am rather shocked to hear that people dont read where you are live :(
well, shocked and sad. I guess when you have great libraries, good schools, and lots and lots of bookworm immigrants, it works.

Funny you mention cigarettes and drinking. Almost nobody I knew smoked tobacco, and I have never in my 20 years smoked a cigarette and never will. we considered it trashy and stupid.
People either didn't drink so much because they were worried about ''the calories in beer'' or ''interaction'' with other drugs they took. but still, it is strange because when I went to college, alcohol was taken in exuberant excess by all but myself, and all the kids were smoking cigarettes!

Soft Serve
12-21-2008, 12:19 AM
Yup. I'm not a part of any of that noise. Some of my friends will mess with me and try to get me to do it with them occasionally, and then I'll tell them statistics like how many people their age do that stuff they say it's not their fault or whatever.

I guess no single raindrop believes it is responsible for the flood...


I tried explaining Lovecrafts writings and Call of Cthulhu to some people and they can't make it past the first paragraph...

Etarnon
12-21-2008, 09:36 AM
There are many secrets, that once unleashed would cause mass panic, if people were to find out.

Thus the investigators delve into the unknown, risking their sanity.

Lovecraft as Paranormal Conspiracy theorist.

Soft Serve
12-21-2008, 06:15 PM
Yeah, but I wanted his "The human mind would collapse under pressure if you could only see how insignificant you are under the weight of the unknown galaxy" stuff too.

well...I guess that about does it actually...I should just say that from now on.:lol:

Webhead
12-23-2008, 01:26 PM
Yeah, but I wanted his "The human mind would collapse under pressure if you could only see how insignificant you are under the weight of the unknown galaxy" stuff too.

well...I guess that about does it actually...I should just say that from now on.:lol:

When I get home, if I can remember to do it, I'll give you one of the most excellently-put, one-sentence summarizations of the "genre" and "theme" of Lovecraft's work that I've read. I use it whenever describing his work to others, though it's been a while, so I've forgotten how it goes verbatim and I would rather not ad lib.

amardolem
12-23-2008, 04:26 PM
I actually read a good portion of Lovecraft's works every fall, various books are all over my house. I've almost gotten to the point where I can read his imitators. (which is actually just about everybody) But the originals still kick the most a$$. Of course I LIVE in worm eaten New England with it's teetering gables and strangely symmetric hill country:D

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rU85OUr7iN8&feature=related



Merry Cthulhumas!! enjoy!!

Stormcrow77
12-23-2008, 05:52 PM
I saw it at a game store... Is itworth $50??


YES!
Best game ever!

Soft Serve
12-23-2008, 10:56 PM
yay christmas game ideas!:D

Soft Serve
12-25-2008, 10:30 PM
Alright I got a copy for christmas and I still haven't finished reading the rules...this game is complex as all hell but it's been fun too.

Mindbomb
12-26-2008, 03:14 PM
LOL, they over-complicate the rules in the book. Everything you'll need to know is on the back of the book except the movement for monsters and you'll remember that once you've played once or twice.

Soft Serve
12-26-2008, 11:48 PM
Yeah I just played a game with my dad, cousin, step brother, and girlfriend. She got devoured early, I got trapped in R'yleh, Step-Brother got devoured when Yog-Sothoth woke up, and then my dad "Ashcan Pete" came through and completely saved the day fireing at the massive beast with a tommy gun...

End game...Everything is destroyed, and a drifter known as Ashcan Pete fires a Tommy gun into a creature that could think to hard and kill everything and the world is saved.

Mindbomb
12-27-2008, 03:59 AM
Sounds like fun, did everyone enjoy it? I hope I(we) didn't mislead you in any way.

Etarnon
12-27-2008, 06:22 AM
Go ashcan pete.

Sounds like Stephen King.

Kinda sorta

Soft Serve
12-28-2008, 04:36 AM
Yeah I love this game so much. I've played it everyday since I've gotten it.

My dad even played it himself while I was asleep. People are coming over to play it and stuff. It's like a public attraction now.

This morning I went through and wrote out which investigators are good for what ancient one by how the ancient one attacks and what the highest amount of whatever he would be hitting is on the investigator sheets...

I only did that though because everyone here scores individually instead of as a team so we know who did the best in the game, so I'm super ready to not come in second or third this time or lose altogether like I have my last 3 games....:(

Mindbomb
12-28-2008, 04:51 PM
Great, I'm glad to know I helped in your decision.

Soft Serve
12-29-2008, 05:05 AM
Yeah, now if I can just afford the $200 expansions....:D

GoddessGood
05-26-2009, 07:50 AM
Picked up my first compilation of Lovecraft over the holiday and started reading with "Rats in the Walls." I found it incredibly easy to read right up until the end, where it went crazy way too fast and left me behind. :( In the middle of "The Portrait in the House" now.

templeorder
05-26-2009, 08:27 AM
Lovecraft, early REH (pre-Conan) and a few other pulp era writers share a lot with Poe in terms of flavor and 'touch'. I have tried to collect all of Lovecraft's works and i also find his influence - Lord Dunsany - to really touch a unique spot that for some reason conjures images so vivid and striking they cannot be ignored. Every game i run eventually brings in elements of Dunsany and Lovecraft - horror and fascination, a compulsion not to turn away from a vision or situation so frightful it threatens to overwhelm sanity itself. And i always use sanity as a game facet now - even if i have to bolt it on myself.

Thank you H.P. for creating an easily accessible common culture and essence that GM's can draw on to really mess with players heads.

Webhead
05-26-2009, 08:54 PM
Picked up my first compilation of Lovecraft over the holiday and started reading with "Rats in the Walls." I found it incredibly easy to read right up until the end, where it went crazy way too fast and left me behind. :( In the middle of "The Portrait in the House" now.

It's worth taking another read through of the last part of "Rats in the Walls" if it didn't completely click the first time through. The "crazy jargon" part is probably the best and most intriguing part of the story. The immediacy of it is intentional. The man sees the "truth" of what lies inside the cave and even mid-thought, for all his reason and intellect, his mind is completely unraveled by what he saw. Great story.

"The Portrait in the House" is a good one as well.

One of my personal faves of Lovecraft's stories is "The Temple". Like all of Lovecraft's work, it is best enjoyed when alone or otherwise in quiet, private comfort.

GoddessGood
05-27-2009, 07:26 AM
Yep, planning on re-reading it just so I can get a better understanding of why it felt like such an easy read to me. One of the things I'd heard about Lovecraft is that he's a little hard to parse.

Webhead
05-27-2009, 10:36 PM
Yep, planning on re-reading it just so I can get a better understanding of why it felt like such an easy read to me. One of the things I'd heard about Lovecraft is that he's a little hard to parse.

That all just depends upon one's literary comfort level. I haven't found any of Lovecraft's work "difficult" to read but it just takes an understanding that he is using some very outdated and obscure (even for his own time) vernacular.

His work is also accused of being "dry" by way of most of his narratives being driven by highly intellectual and sophisticated characters. Personally, I find that it only adds to the atmosphere of horror by demonstrating that even the most seemingly sound, resolute and learned mind can be so instantly undone by the discovery of the "secret Truths" about the Universe and how ultimately insignificant humanity is by comparison. In short: "we are not the masters of our reality that we presume to be".

GoddessGood
05-28-2009, 07:57 AM
Finished reading The Picture in the House, The Outsider, and Pickman's Model yesterday. So far, I love the imagery of his stories and how convincingly horrified the people narrating them are, but I can usually guess what's going on before he gets to the big reveal and it sort of spoils the suspense for me :(.

I'm reading this book (http://www.amazon.com/Best-H-P-Lovecraft-Bloodcurdling/dp/0345350804#), in case anyone is curious.

Webhead
05-28-2009, 09:33 PM
...I'm reading this book (http://www.amazon.com/Best-H-P-Lovecraft-Bloodcurdling/dp/0345350804#), in case anyone is curious.

I have that one. It's a good solid collection of some of his works.

Yes, Lovecraft tends to be more of "horror of atmosphere" and not "horror of reveal" or "shock horror" as a lot of more modern writers are. It's the kind of "hair standing up on the back of your neck" sort of fear and not the "jump out of your seat" sort.

TahaCelestin
06-10-2009, 02:35 PM
Howard! Phillips! Lovecraft!

Ken Hites, author of the new Lovecraftian game Trail of Cthulhu, wrote short critical essays on each of Lovecraft's stories while working on the game. The original form of the "Tour de Lovecraft" is at his blog http://princeofcairo.livejournal.com/87248.html,

while an edited form is published as a book and a PDF by Atomic Overmind Press http://atomicovermind.com/blog/?page_id=121.

They are very readable while addressing themes in Lovecraft's intellectual and political life, trends in scholarship on our favorite Providencer, and connections with other media and the authors inspiring Lovecraft: Dunsany, Poe, etc. Good stuff.

As long as I'm linking, we have a perfectly enormous backlog of Lovecraft discussions at http://yog-sothoth.com, which is primarily forums and media for the Call of Cthulhu game and other roleplaying treatments.

Soft Serve
06-17-2009, 08:05 PM
First post in months, only makes sense it should go on one of my first posts ever. :)

I'm somewhere at 1/4th through the Necronomicon. I got caught up in Max Brooks, but to come back to Lovecraft is great.

I absolutely LOVED the Music of Eric Zann, The Unnameable, Under the Pyramids and the Cats of Ulthar. I didn't understand the Doom that came to Sarnath though.

I must have read The Call of Cthulhu some 40 times now. It's like a bedtime story. I've memorized the poem "Nightgaunts"



"If only they would make some sound,
or wear a face where faces should be found!"


Love that line. Does anyone else think it's weird that this vicious looking devil...

http://www.elfwood.com/art/k/y/kyzhuroth/nightgaunt.jpg

...has only one form of combat, which is tickling a person until they're laughing too hard to resist being carried to something bigger?

Could anyone tell me which one is the one with the family that breaks down into incest and creates these giant white gorrila things that start killing peoples? I remember a part of it has a partner of the antagonists (Can't remember his name) looks out a window and stays stuck in that position until this storm ends, and when he goes to check him the guys face was eaten clean off his head. I want to say "The Lurking Fear" but I'm not sure...