PDA

View Full Version : Any Deaf Palyers Out there?



Chavic
11-19-2008, 01:12 PM
I am taking an ASL III class and I was just curious in how many Deaf or Hard of Hearing players there were in the DnD community.

GoddessGood
11-19-2008, 01:28 PM
Wow, that's an interesting question. I've not known any ... come to think of it I haven't heard of any deaf RPGers either. That makes me a sad panda :( I wonder, though, if you'd need to come up with any special signs just for gaming?

Arch Lich Thoth-Amon
11-19-2008, 01:44 PM
I played with a blind gamer at a con once. He kicked our asses, and left us impressed with his memory skills. I've never played with any hard of hearing or deaf players, but certainly would for this game only requires imagination and interest. Sorry i couldnt be of any help with your query.

cplmac
11-19-2008, 04:02 PM
I have played with someone that is hard of hearing. He is actually my Brother-in Law. No, we didn't have to have any special signs. He is able to read lips, so I just had to make sure that I didn't talk too fast. As a matter of fact, he liked to play his characters as being hard of hearing themselves. This way if he missed something, he just played it as the character didn't hear what was said. I can honestly say that it had no impact on the flow of the game.

Webhead
11-19-2008, 04:20 PM
I've never gamed with, or known, any deaf RPGers nor any who were truly blind, but I did game with a guy who had terrible eyesight such that he was declared legally blind. He used a sort of magnifying glass to read small print from books and character sheets, but he was more than capable of managing the movement of minis on a battle grid. Great guy and excellent role player. Really funny too. I kinda wish he still had time and availability to join our group, though it would mean more than likely having to game at his house since he couldn't drive.

Arch Lich Thoth-Amon
11-19-2008, 05:35 PM
That's what i love about this game, physical handicap has no bearing on ability to have fun in the imaginative worlds of the role/rollplayers.

gdmcbride
11-20-2008, 06:17 PM
I have known one deaf gamer though that was years ago. And really she wasn't what I would call a hard-core gamer.

I have gamed with several people in wheel chairs and currently play with someone with MS.

Its already been said, but I think it bears repeating, RPGs are a hobby where most physical handicaps matter very little. Fundamentally, we play in the realms of the imagination and there we all can fly.

Gary

tesral
11-20-2008, 11:23 PM
One of our Friday group is i an wheelchair, degenerative muscle disease. He is just learning the game and has to have his brother or aide do all the physical stuff for him.

I'll totlaly agree wit hthe point that the game doesn't require anything but a mind.

Arch Lich Thoth-Amon
11-20-2008, 11:40 PM
One of our Friday group is i an wheelchair, degenerative muscle disease. He is just learning the game and has to have his brother or aide do all the physical stuff for him.

I'll totlaly agree wit hthe point that the game doesn't require anything but a mind.
Very cool. He's gotta be loving it. Rpg's are great in that race, gender, physical ability, or anything else that separates us as human beings, does not apply around the gaming table. At the gaming table, we are all equal.

The world could learn alot from gamers.

Bearfoot_Adam
11-21-2008, 01:01 AM
A guy I gamed with was deaf in one ear so we just made sure to put him on the side of the room where his good ear could pick up everything.

ChaunceyK
11-21-2008, 12:30 PM
That's what i love about this game, physical handicap has no bearing on ability to have fun in the imaginative worlds of the role/rollplayers.

Here here. We rpg'ers have an often-unfair perception of being 1000% geek, but truth is, we're a pretty accepting bunch. Don't care who you are, where you come from, what you look like, or what you're personal handicap/disability may be...pull up a chair & start rolling some dice with us!

Webhead
11-21-2008, 01:22 PM
Here here. We rpg'ers have an often-unfair perception of being 1000% geek, but truth is, we're a pretty accepting bunch. Don't care who you are, where you come from, what you look like, or what you're personal handicap/disability may be...pull up a chair & start rolling some dice with us!

Indeed. In role playing, we can all be heroes.

Anaesthesia
11-21-2008, 02:23 PM
One girl in my last tabletop game had major hearing loss in her left ear-she always made sure that she positioned herself so her right ear could pick everything up. She was quite interesting as well-she also had Multiple Personalities. There was only 2 that only surfaced during the game-the "main" one, and the one that was actually playing the character.

GoddessGood
11-21-2008, 03:26 PM
Indeed. In role playing, we can all be heroes.

Unless you're too young, you drink or do drugs before/at the game, you've got too disruptive a mental problem, bad manners ...

I hate to be snarky, but we've all got our qualifications. I love that we play a game that is so open, but not every one who plays it shares that same quality. And I don't exlude myself from this criticism, either.

ChaunceyK
11-21-2008, 04:29 PM
You make a good point, Goddess. We may be welcoming of anyone, but likewise, the person should be respectful of the group environment as well.

Webhead
11-21-2008, 04:54 PM
Unless you're too young, you drink or do drugs before/at the game, you've got too disruptive a mental problem, bad manners ...

I hate to be snarky, but we've all got our qualifications. I love that we play a game that is so open, but not every one who plays it shares that same quality. And I don't exlude myself from this criticism, either.

True. I was thinking more along the lines of gender/race/physical capability/cultural/religious/socio-economic disparities. Yes, people of particularly abrasive lifestyles or behaviors are not really the kind of people I want to game with, but a jerk/pothead/troll can be a person of any background. If you're friendly, likeable and have an imagination, you are welcome at my game table.

cplmac
11-21-2008, 07:56 PM
I have known one deaf gamer though that was years ago. And really she wasn't what I would call a hard-core gamer.

I have gamed with several people in wheel chairs and currently play with someone with MS.

Its already been said, but I think it bears repeating, RPGs are a hobby where most physical handicaps matter very little. Fundamentally, we play in the realms of the imagination and there we all can fly.

Gary


Does the player with MS in your group have any issues with cognitive problems. I ask because my mother has MS and the type that she has does affect memory. It seems that the medication that she has been on is helping in really slowing the progression of the MS.

Chavic
11-21-2008, 08:30 PM
I'm glad to see the gamer world is so accepting, like what has already been said: All you need is a mind to play.

gdmcbride
11-22-2008, 02:55 AM
Does the player with MS in your group have any issues with cognitive problems. I ask because my mother has MS and the type that she has does affect memory. It seems that the medication that she has been on is helping in really slowing the progression of the MS.

I've noticed no effects.

Gary

ChaunceyK
11-22-2008, 08:12 AM
Perhaps the best assessment of us "gaming geeks" would be that we're simply willing to give anyone a chance to join our games...THEN if they're particularly disruptive, they get das boot.

Windrider687
11-25-2008, 11:51 PM
I'm not completely deaf, but am Hard of Hearing, and (obviously) a player. I was in a relationship with a deaf/Deaf person and they played a few times in my group, so I s'pose that would count, too?

Total Nerd v2.135 (final)
11-26-2008, 12:46 AM
Unless you're too young, you drink or do drugs before/at the game, you've got too disruptive a mental problem, bad manners ...

I hate to be snarky, but we've all got our qualifications. I love that we play a game that is so open, but not every one who plays it shares that same quality. And I don't exlude myself from this criticism, either.


Well there are certainly plenty of people with substance dependence problems or severe depression, who are very well mannered, conduct themselves with the utmost propriety, and are capable of being perfectly engaged and enthusiastic gamers. Imaginative, cooperative, and fun-loving people with substance or mood pathologies are intimidated by people not understanding and eschewing or even hating them for their struggles, and may miss wonderful gaming opportunities to simply avoid 'punishing' social interactions. I would not be so quick to condemn them.

Total Nerd v2.135 (final)
11-26-2008, 12:48 AM
anyone with AIDS?

ChaunceyK
11-26-2008, 08:16 AM
How 'bout this one...

Anyone with a lack of ability to roll your own dice? (amputee, birth defect, paralysis)

That'd make for one dedicated role-player! :biggrin:

cplmac
11-26-2008, 09:16 AM
How 'bout this one...

Anyone with a lack of ability to roll your own dice? (amputee, birth defect, paralysis)

That'd make for one dedicated role-player! :biggrin:


When I was in college at Edinboro University in PA, there was a guy there that was missing his left hand. Amazingly enough, he was an art major and could draw like crazy! He seemed to have no problem doing anything, to include tying shoe laces.

We were well known for have both the Monopoly and Risk games checked out all the time at our dorm. Rolling the dice was nothing for him.

Grimwell
11-26-2008, 11:37 AM
I've seen a paraplegic at Gen Con in the past. Which speaks to the amazing levels of accessibility that gaming can offer.

tesral
11-26-2008, 11:39 AM
How 'bout this one...

Anyone with a lack of ability to roll your own dice? (amputee, birth defect, paralysis)

That'd make for one dedicated role-player! :biggrin:


Ben whom I mentioned earlier.

ChaunceyK
11-26-2008, 05:26 PM
Ben whom I mentioned earlier.

Brain fart on my part :nerd:...maybe that's why the idea came to me.

Windrider687
11-28-2008, 09:06 PM
I've seen a paraplegic at Gen Con in the past. Which speaks to the amazing levels of accessibility that gaming can offer.

Well, paraplegia really doesn't limit role playing, or most non-phyical gaming in any form...so I wouldn't call the accessability 'amazing' per se (being also a paraplegic myself).

wolff96
11-28-2008, 11:18 PM
I have played with someone that is hard of hearing. He is actually my Brother-in Law. No, we didn't have to have any special signs. He is able to read lips, so I just had to make sure that I didn't talk too fast.

I've been in this situation as well. Gamed for a long time with a guy that was completely deaf, but could read lips really well. We always left him the seat opposite the DM, so he could see all the players at the table at once.

Whether he was an especially good lip reader or we all just talked slowly, he never had a lick of trouble understanding and being involved with everything around the table. The only issues we ever had was with a foreign gamer (English as third language) who had trouble understanding him at first, due to accent mis-match. :)

Grimwell
11-29-2008, 11:46 AM
Well, paraplegia really doesn't limit role playing, or most non-phyical gaming in any form...so I wouldn't call the accessability 'amazing' per se (being also a paraplegic myself).

Good point, I might have been a little too excited with my seasoning words in that line. :redface: I was so excited that I used the word "paraplegic" instead of quadriplegic. Not that it changes much, gaming requires little more than imagination and the ability to communicate. Everything else is table dressing!