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Foki Firefinger
09-26-2008, 11:08 PM
One of my pet projects is studying the types of foods eaten in the middle ages or times simulair to our fantasy role playing. I got tire or just having the players eat stew in the taverns and iron rations out in the wilderness. As an "evil" dm I made the keep track of their rations, and of course, lack thereof. Sometimes just general survival is the great adventure. Out of rations, will you must forage or hunt. Now, do you know how to hunt? Do you know what to forage, that is edible. Its a whole different adventure when you are hunting deer and encounter a monster, or better yet, just a mother grizzzy bear with cubs.
Keeping you characters bellies filled is a whole new adventure---such as the following: Stop at the local gnome town for some fresh earth pie? A nice lunch with the elves with some thinly sliced vension with wild blueberry sauce. wild veggies and some elderberry wine? Dinner at the dwarven fortress with roasted cave hare, mushroom streak stew, fresh baked spore bread and Mushroom ale? How about a meal with your half-orc buddy- consisting of blood sausage, stewed onions and garlic, black bread and the famous Black ale brewed by the orc (if you can dare drink it!)?
Add a little bit of flavor (pun intendced) to you dm/gm skills. Develop hunting and foraging charts for your poor staving characters, once the food runs low. Discover just how much food a human, elf, half-elf, dwarf, half-orc or halfling needs each day to survive. Try suviving on half rations and see just how much energy you have to fight that dragon! :rolleyes:

Foki Firefinger
09-26-2008, 11:11 PM
Correction on the gnome cusine-- its fresh earth worm pie-- sorry for the typo. :D

nijineko
09-27-2008, 12:22 AM
spicing up the food options is always a good way to get a session cooking with grease! ;D

Arch Lich Thoth-Amon
09-27-2008, 12:44 AM
I've implemented it years ago in my DnD games, including diseases and cures(these can be hilarious) from the middle ages. In all fairness, i only add it to the DnD game for flavor, but in WFRP, they take to the next level.

cplmac
09-27-2008, 10:55 AM
Since the group has just started and the party has only covered one day, they have only used 1 of their 14 days of iron rations. I'm going to wait until they get up on the 15th day and when they say that they get something to eat, then I will tell them that they have ate all of those rations that they brought with them. Of course, since 3 other members of our group are on here also, I'll see if one of them mentions this possible problem to the rest of the party.

In the party's favor is the fact that they do have a ranger with them that would know what is edible and what isn't. I'll just have to be sure to make things not too easy if they wait until they have no food to eat before foraging or hunting. To see what all takes place, I post the game session on the "Lost Caverns of Tsojcanth" thread under the campaign invitations section. There is also a first person account in the D&D portion of the Fantasy section by one of the members of the party (Weslocke).

Foki Firefinger
09-27-2008, 11:50 AM
Another factor, groups fail to take into account is the need for water. A gaming group of mine decided to tackle a desert in one of my gaming worlds, each armed with only one waterskin and a thirsty horse and decked in shiny new metal armor. First, the armor had to be stripped because they fail to realize it is better to travel at night if so clothed than in the burning daylight. Next, your animals do need water and horses need much more than humans. Then they found out that waterskins were not endless and do need to be refilled. By the time they had found their way back to the caravan trails, their last horse had died due to their drinking of their steeds blood for the moisture. They vowed to never adventure in the desert ever again. Unfortunately, they did not have a ranger and did not think to hire one of the locals to guide them through the desert.

Grumpy Old Man
09-27-2008, 02:03 PM
A long time ago I had a DM who was meticulous about those kinds of details. For the last 30 years most of my characters have either had cooking skills, survival skills or both. Every time I have to camp I ask about terrain and give a list of plants i am looking for. Fishing, getting eggs for breakfast or a nice fate hare to supplement rations. My bag always has herbs, spices and salt in it so for some oddball reason my character usually ends up being the camp cook. Misspent youth on the farm and camping being a favorite activity may account for my attention to food and water.

It bothers me a little when people outfit themselves with horses and never think about how they are going to care for the animals but I just have to remember they probably don't get to keep their goldfish very long either and don't have a clue.

Bad thing about being camp cook in the campaign was somehow being volunteered to cook for the group too. So much for the gamers staple diet, Pepsi and pizza with an occasional sub for variety.

Arch Lich Thoth-Amon
09-27-2008, 02:34 PM
My players better have hunting/gathering skills on their adventures. This means they set traps for rabbits, etc., as well as having the rations for their mounts. If they decide to make a fire, weather permitting, they know to be cautious about it, for not only can a campfire with the smell of coffee or cooked rabbit draw or deterr attentions of wild animals or worse, including types who attentions one does not wish to draw. It takes very little time in the game and has the added benefit to give a sense of realism to the players. Players alway remark how cool the adventures are when doing such things.

There are plusses and minuses to everything. I had one party that used to draw a private wagon wherever they went, within reason, even paying local NPC guards to guard it when they were down in a hole, whatever, or if they didnt have that kind of cash, tried to hide said wagon whenever they could.

Weather: players that adventure long distances and in bad weather know to be smart. If they kill a bear and skin it for its coat, the better they are in the harsh environment. If youre wondering, i do give out free skills from time to time depending on how often they see and participate in these skills. They are not hard to learn and one can become adept in no time at all.

I could go on and on and on, but you all get the idea.

Foki Firefinger
09-27-2008, 03:25 PM
Its really interesting watching the group scavage for food or water in the undergroud realms. Which fungus is edible and is that stagnant pond safe to drink. No wonder most of the creature underearth seem to be carnivores. I did develop some animals for the lesser place in the food chain so that dwarves, goblins, orcs, drow, etc, have a food source besides just Rothe'. Such creatures nicknamed 'cave hens, cave sheep, cave pigs and cave rabbits' fit the bill. Some small enough to survive on mosses, molds, lichens and algaes--- but good enough for that stew. The dwarves just cant trade for all of their sustance. And mushrooms could be gathered or even grown in underearth farms-- thus giant mushrooms for mushroom steak (no meat, just a large slab of mushroom).

Arch Lich Thoth-Amon
09-27-2008, 04:57 PM
When i was running a WLD(Worlds Largest Dungeon) a few year back, the characters were cooking rats for jerky. One character, a bit on the unbalanced side, even toasted up a Gnome that died of an unfortunate attack by a swarm of rats.

The argument was about starvation and survival, and i am proud of my players playing their characters in both character and alignment, for it was fun watching the players react according to both their alignment and character, roleplay at its best. If i had the audio of it i could of made excellent money for in on Ebay and gamer sites. This is actually a great story and would love to share it, but it would be as long as a novella, so i will spare you all the detail... for now. Perhaps i will create a thread when i have more time. It's a great story that is still talked about today.

nijineko
09-27-2008, 06:13 PM
i tend to pay attention to it until i find a way around it, spell, power, item, or something. ^^ then i typically forget until i hit a zone where above said items don't work....

tesral
09-28-2008, 03:03 AM
Food comes up in game. I have old hands at it. They know the drill and I don't push the issue as repeatedly talking about rations gets old. A certain amount of gold is spent on food and supplies. I only get sticky about it when the environment is trying to kill them.

The subject of what (who) is food in my one oh Line D&D game. The party had just finished defending against attacking mongrelman villagers. Zot a Blue Saurio had taken the body of a girl killed in the fight and taken a couple of bites out of her. He is explaining to Edgar the why of the Saurio custom of eating dead foes.



Edgar just looks at Zot stunned. "You have to eat people you kill?"


Zot: "Yes. It's only proper." (Serious look) There are two reasons here. one pragmatic, one philosophical. Pragmatic: We hire out as mercenaries. The best battle is the one you don't have to fight. We make no secret of the fact that after we wipe the field with you we are eating anyone left behind. Two, our commanders always leave the enemy a way to escape. Faced with 200 raving flesh eating monsters in front of you or a quick way off the field, most people choose to drop their weapons and run like bunnies, and we make a point to never chase down fleeing troops that have disarmed. Result we "fight" very few battles. However it doesn't work if you are not seen eating the dead.

Philosophical: A dead person has no use of the flesh. It isn't them, they are not there anymore. If you must kill, do not waste. We are carnivores. Kirt teaches that to waste the flesh by allowing it to rot is to disrespect those that died. Killing someone to eat them is wrong. Seek a non sentient prey. But once someone is dead, do not waste. Normally I would have taken her with me so to eat as much as I could have. But I'm in mixed company and among tender stomachs and those that don't like the practice. So I did enough for form's sake and I'll leave it at that."

kirksmithicus
09-29-2008, 04:11 PM
Generally I use food as a means to enhance the setting in a descriptive way, but when characters are lost or out adventuring for a long time it can become an important issue that impacts the game.


It bothers me a little when people outfit themselves with horses and never think about how they are going to care for the animals but I just have to remember they probably don't get to keep their goldfish very long either and don't have a clue.

The Horse Owners Manual

The amount of food a horse needs will depend on such things as size, breed, age, and activity. In cold weather, a horse living outside needs more food just to keep warm.
As a general rule, a horse needs 2 to 2.2 pounds of feed for every 100 pounds of body weight. For example, an average 1000 lb horse would need 20 to 25 pounds of feed a day. Most of that should be hay. A typical diet for a horse being ridden for one hour five days a week would be 2 to 5 pounds of grain and 15 to 20 pounds of hay a day, split into at least two separate meals. Fresh water is a vital part of your horse's diet. Horses drink from 5 to 10 gallons a day. Clean water should be available at all times except when the horse is very hot from work. Proper farrier work is essential to your horse's comfort and soundness. To avoid problems you should have a regular six to eight-week trimming schedule whether the hooves look as if they need it or not.


Yep horses require a lot more care and food than most people think. If you're a mean GM like I am you can have the characters run their horses to death, or go lame. In which case the rider gets thrown and could potentially get injured or killed.


Maintenance is probably one of my biggest hang ups, PC's always have their characters go to the inn for a drink during down time. You hardly ever hear them say, my fighter is going up to his room to inspect his equipment and try to repair anything that needs it. That is until you keep a list of their gear and roll for wear on each piece of equipment after each adventure or game session. When the wear value reaches one (counting down from 10) then it breaks during the next adventure. Spending a bit of time on maintenance prevents things from wearing out so quickly. A tad bit anal I know. I try not to make it that much of an issue anymore because it does get a bit tiresome after a while.

nijineko
09-29-2008, 04:17 PM
one common generic rule i sometimes use is that when you roll a natural "1", that your weapon takes the damage it would have otherwise dealt, with whatever appropriate descriptions fit the situation, and minus it's hardness and so forth. enough of that and you'll eventually brake the weapon. and even when i'm using the custom crit/fumble charts instead, it shows up as an entry on the fumble side.

Valdar
09-29-2008, 04:52 PM
Logistics tend to bog down a game, but describing the food might let people get in character more.

For medieval food, if you can get ahold of Maggie Black's book "The Medieval Cookbook", you should be set. A common element in Medieval cooking is to mix sweet and savory- turkey with cranberry sauce is a good example of the sort of thing Medieval folks liked to eat (though turkey itself is from America, so not that particular dish).

I once threw the party for a loop when they tried authentic Dwarven ale- since it was made from mushrooms to begin with, rather than going through the trouble to brew it into alcohol, they simply used psychedelic mushrooms as the drug in their recreational beverage...

nijineko
09-29-2008, 05:03 PM
ouch.....

Foki Firefinger
09-29-2008, 07:23 PM
Once big challenge in the game is not just medievel cooking, but trying to invent dishes that would be eaten by elves, dwarves, gnomes, halfings and halforcs. Not counting any other race that is going to be in the gaming world you are using. Non-human races can be a lot harder than demi-human races. For example, reptilian races would probably swallow small rodents whole or eat raw meat, with the more civilized eating thinly slice raw meats. Strictly herbivorous races would probably enjoy a meal of chopped hay and grain. And do you even want to debate the foods of insectivores and scavengers? Canine races would stow large bone for their young to break their teeth on and probably enjoy an ocashional gnaw themthelves. Rodent races must have gnaw sticks of some sort being that their teeth never stop growing and they must wear them down. Avain races would probably have to swallow small pebbles once and a while for their digestion. A GM/DM could get quite amagintive with such races.

tesral
09-29-2008, 08:08 PM
Yep horses require a lot more care and food than most people think. If you're a mean GM like I am you can have the characters run their horses to death, or go lame. In which case the rider gets thrown and could potentially get injured or killed.


I don't punish people with horses. I use the simple rule that horses require four times the supplies that a humanoid would. It is a tad over simplified, but the focus here is on not turning the party's mounts into a tamagotch designed to punish them if they don't take up game time on their maintenance.

I skim over personal maintenance in general. Weapons and gear? No you don't have to keep telling me you fixed it, cleaned it, etc.. It is assumed that such things are part of your daily maintenances that everyone does. I don't insist on PC bathroom breaks either. "We make camp and set watches" is sufficient. Having done camping myself there is a good deal of downtime between getting set up, eating and cleaning the dishes and finally going to sleep. People don't sit and stare at each other. They do what needs to be done, fix the loose strap, sharpen your sword, study your spells, what ever needs doing.

Sometimes I'll get fun with the food and describe a banquet in detail. But inn food for the lost part is cheap, filling, and easy to serve, roast meats and stews both fall into that category. Trail food is dull.

I have used a protracted journey to emphasize the trail food is dull thing. A party was stuck eating dried fish for weeks. All the PCs swore off dried fish forever.

Valdar
09-30-2008, 03:51 AM
And do you even want to debate the foods of insectivores and scavengers?

Sure. Insectivores will want to eat their food live- Star Trek had it right with Klingon's Pagh. Otherwise too much of the moisture and nutrient escapes when killing the tiny thing (though you can get away with lightly roasting in hot ash, if you're careful, and don't mind some gritty ash with your meal...)

This is from personal experience cooking and eating traditional Australian Outback Aboriginal "cuisine"...

kirksmithicus
09-30-2008, 09:56 AM
I don't punish people with horses. I use the simple rule that horses require four times the supplies that a humanoid would. It is a tad over simplified, but the focus here is on not turning the party's mounts into a tamagotch designed to punish them if they don't take up game time on their maintenance.

I skim over personal maintenance in general. Weapons and gear? No you don't have to keep telling me you fixed it, cleaned it, etc.. It is assumed that such things are part of your daily maintenances that everyone does. I don't insist on PC bathroom breaks either. "We make camp and set watches" is sufficient.

I tend to skim over it also. However, some players tend to treat horses as tireless machines (Which annoys me a little given that I started riding at the age of 3) or they are not willing to part with a small amount of the characters money for the upkeep of their horse, equipment or arms. At any rate I agree that making such things the focus of the game is boring and bogs things down and it generally doesn't come up unless it gets abused.

kirksmithicus
09-30-2008, 10:26 AM
Foki, if you have a copy of your menu that you could post for downloading, that would be awesome. I for one would like a copy for use as a game resource if you are willing to post it up. :D

tesral
09-30-2008, 12:12 PM
I tend to skim over it also. However, some players tend to treat horses as tireless machines (Which annoys me a little given that I started riding at the age of 3) or they are not willing to part with a small amount of the characters money for the upkeep of their horse, equipment or arms. At any rate I agree that making such things the focus of the game is boring and bogs things down and it generally doesn't come up unless it gets abused.

I keep in mind that horses are living beings that fatigue as well. I know a bit about horses; Gaming the Horse (http://phoenixinn.iwarp.com/fantasy/horse_chart.html). I was actually asked to do companion articles on camels and elephants, I declined. Write what you know. The Zoo is the closest I have ever been to either.

I have some improvements planned for the Horse article.

Foki Firefinger
09-30-2008, 02:55 PM
Foki, if you have a copy of your menu that you could post for downloading, that would be awesome. I for one would like a copy for use as a game resource if you are willing to post it up. :D

Which would you like-- varous human cultures _ I have basic medieval, oriental or arab cusine. Elven, gnome, dwarven, halfling or orc? Ration kits according to race. I am still working on some of the stuff and adding more information such as drow foods, hill or mountain dwarven foods, etc. I also made lists of tavern foods and rating of such, As well as examples of foods according to area (coastal foods are different from other areas for example). Hey, I am disable, so I have a lot of time on my hands and I love to make charts and tables. I also have a hunting table and a foraging table which takes into consideration the time of year, climate and area. But hey, I am obsessive/conpulsive with my gaming stuff and a perfectionist (always more to add to the table and charts). People in the roup used to bet me to make a table or chart out of everything (they no longer do that, because I win everytime).

tesral
09-30-2008, 06:33 PM
Any and all as far as I'm concerned.

Foki Firefinger
10-01-2008, 12:44 AM
Before you can decide what type of food to forage, hunt for or boy for your D&D character a few basics should be discussed. Much of the information was gleamed from the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons Wilderness Survival Guide (1986 edition).
The chart is pretty basic, but gives you somewhat of an idea of the daily requirements of food and water of your characters... Anything less could hamper your characters proformance.

Daily Minimen Food Requirements
Race 7day 8day 9day Aditional
Week Week Week Day
(in lbs) (in lbs.) (in lbs) (in lbs.)

Human 14 16 18 2
Half elf 14 16 18 2
Dwarf 14 16 18 2
Elf 10.5 12 13.5 1.5
Gnome 7 8 9 1
Halfling 7 8 9 1
Note: halfings prefer to live upon human amount of rations)
Half-orc 17.5 20 22.5 2.5
Half-orgre 24.5 28 31.5 3.5
Weight of food varies between standard rations and iron (preserved or dried) rations.
It depends upon the water content of the foods.
This chart is pretty basic and you can use the race that is close to any other race you use,

Weekly Normal Requirements for water


----------Pints--------------- -------------Gallons-----------
Race 7day 8 day 9 day Add day 7day 8day 9day Add day
week week week week week week

Human 63 72 81 9 8 9.5 10.5 1.13
(and half-elf)
Dwarf 38.5 44 49.5 5.5 4.9 5.5 6.2 5.5 pints
(Gnome & Halfing)
Elf 49 56 63 7 6.1 7 7.9 7 pints
Half-orc 63 72 81 9 8 9.5 10.5 1.13
Half-orgre 77 88 99 11 10 11.5 13 1.39
Water can usage will increase with higher temperture and greater activity.
(note that the mesurements are not exact, but in most cases rounded upward and a little exra is always good) And remember that a gallon should weigh 5 lbs.

Foki Firefinger
10-01-2008, 12:46 AM
Sorry the chart did not come through as I type if, so I will have to redo it!

Foki Firefinger
10-01-2008, 12:50 AM
Suggestion that a tables function could be added to reply format. :(

tesral
10-01-2008, 12:55 AM
Sorry the chart did not come through as I type if, so I will have to redo it!

Post us a PDF of your charts. If you don't have a website I would be glad to host it, with full credit of course on The Olde Phoenix Inn.

No tables do not work in the forums, it's a limitation of the system.

Arch Lich Thoth-Amon
10-01-2008, 08:57 AM
I love penandpapergames! There are sooo many freakin' cool people on these boards. This site does not disappoint.

Thanx Farcaster, for creating it.

kirksmithicus
10-07-2008, 10:53 AM
I would love to see everything!, but whatever you want to post would be awesome. My current flavor of the month is just your average Old Tyme menu. :D

If you want I could certainly host your material on my web site also (I'm going to revamp it soon) or you could post it in the articles/blog section of this site. If you need help converting your files into pdf format or anything else just give me a holler.

Grumpy Old Man
10-08-2008, 04:23 PM
Funny how in most games and you set down in a saloon, bar, inn the menu is almost always stew and ale. Whenever I ask for something in particular its always handy. If an order is asked for by the DM's PC waiter the other players always ask for stew and ale. Ask for a dozen fried eggs a hunk of cheddar cheese, a loaf of hard wheat bread, a bowl of fruit and nuts and a pitcher of buttermilk and everybody goes, oh, uh, yeah, that too. (Except for the buttermilk)

tesral
10-08-2008, 10:51 PM
Funny how in most games and you set down in a saloon, bar, inn the menu is almost always stew and ale. Whenever I ask for something in particular its always handy. If an order is asked for by the DM's PC waiter the other players always ask for stew and ale. Ask for a dozen fried eggs a hunk of cheddar cheese, a loaf of hard wheat bread, a bowl of fruit and nuts and a pitcher of buttermilk and everybody goes, oh, uh, yeah, that too. (Except for the buttermilk)

Most of the time there isn't a point in "no". Slap enough money on the table and they'll send the kid down the road for it.

Truth is in most taverns you would be lucky to find food, never mind a good hearty stew. Ale, one kind of ale, maybe bread and perhaps cheese with the ale. Unless they have beer, one kind of beer....

Fantasy taverns are a fantasy. An overlay of Medieval Fantasy on Applebee's. I'm good with that. We are there to have fun, not recreate the nasty old times.

boulet
10-09-2008, 07:17 AM
We are there to have fun, not recreate the nasty old times.
Coming from a Lich, it takes a whole new dimension :)

Grumpy Old Man
10-09-2008, 02:51 PM
Just another setting to enjoy a little role playing, an argument over Elf Wine, drinking contest between a Half/Orc fighter and a Halfling gulping down Dwarf Whiskey. Sticking peas up your nose and shooting them down the cleavage of the serving wench is always a good way to start a distracting brawl while another character sneaks out to do something he didn't want to be noticed doing. If everybody is eating stew and drinking ale the vegetarian in the group is going to get blamed when somebody steals his grapes and tosses them underfoot of the dancing bard or minstrel. Food is way to much fun to just let be a humdrum affair. Goes back to when I was a babyy dinosaur and I was told to not play with my food, that lesson didn't take very well.

nijineko
10-09-2008, 04:06 PM
Sorry the chart did not come through as I type if, so I will have to redo it!

i'd be happy to convert it to pdf for you.


Suggestion that a tables function could be added to reply format. :(

ditto this! =D

kirksmithicus
10-23-2008, 11:52 PM
So I was working on this random generator file for food / menus and I was wondering if anyone had any more suggestions for things to add or changes.

Here is the link to the blog page (http://www.penandpapergames.com/userpages/showentry.php?e=111) and to the .nam file (http://www.geocities.com/kirksmithicus/Downloads/TavernMenu.txt) directly (text file). It's for generic human food but I was thinking of maybe doing a separate exotic food generator. Grilled carrion crawler served with boysenberry sauce, herbed goat cheese and fermented yak's milk? Anyone? Okay, maybe not.

tesral
10-24-2008, 12:06 AM
Grilled carrion crawler served with boysenberry sauce, herbed goat cheese and fermented yak's milk? Anyone? Okay, maybe not.

The latter is real.

kirksmithicus
10-27-2008, 12:20 AM
Yep, you gotta love fermented Yak milk. How about thinly sliced strips of meat placed under the saddle that are parboiled and salted by the heat and sweat of your horse while you ride.....yummmmy Mongol horde food.



Mongol: Do you have any Horde experience?

Job Applicant: No Horde experience per se but I do have two years of pre-law, and I did a summer internship at a law office.

Mongol: Close enough, come in on Monday for your fur and leather fitting and to watch the sexual harassment video. What can I say......it's the law.

Arch Lich Thoth-Amon
10-27-2008, 12:28 AM
The latter is real.
How 'bout spoiled meat with maggots found throughout. I hear it's, or it was, a delicacy to the Tibetans 100 years ago. I guess if you grow up on it, one can learn to like pretty much anything. Now-a-days, i think of maggot meat as Orc grub. Yep, I've been playing DnD for a long time. How long, you ask? Well, i'm one of the liches on these boards.

Btw, good to see you again, tesral. What's it been, 5000 years? Those were good times, werent they?

tesral
10-27-2008, 12:31 AM
How 'bout spoiled meat with maggots found throughout. I hear it's, or it was, a delicacy to the Tibetans 100 years ago. I guess if you grow up on it, one can learn to like pretty much anything. Now-a-days, i think of maggot meat as Orc grub. Yep, I've been playing DnD for a long time. How long, you ask? Well, i'm one of the liches on these boards.

Btw, good to see you again, tesral. What's it been, 5000 years? Those were good times, werent they?

Every culture has its spoiled food. I loved the one TV program that got the lovers of Stilton cheese together with the thousand year egg fanciers. Interesting watching them try each others "wonderful treat".

nijineko
10-27-2008, 02:38 AM
i heard that they cheat now, and only bury the egg for ten to twenty years. no patience.

tesral
10-27-2008, 08:59 AM
i heard that they cheat now, and only bury the egg for ten to twenty years. no patience.

It's something like 40 days actually, but "40 day eggs" just isn't sexy.

cplmac
10-27-2008, 06:42 PM
Actually, in our campaign, the party managed to kill a sub adult dragon that didn't have spell ability yet or things would have been alot different during the battle. Anyhow, afterwards they asked if they could roast the dragon meat? I figured why not. It made for a fine feast at the camp that night. Of course, the next day as they proceeded on, the dwarf was knawing on one of the thighs while they rode on.

boulet
10-28-2008, 07:17 AM
Of course, the next day as they proceeded on, the dwarf was knawing on one of the thighs while they rode on.
You mean this very bone that's probably twice as long as a dwarf ? :)

cplmac
10-28-2008, 09:23 AM
You mean this very bone that's probably twice as long as a dwarf ? :)


Yep, but then with his 18/66 strength he was able to hold it. Also, that was the piece he took the night before when the had their feast so about half of the meat had been ate already. His philosophy is why let good meat go to waste.