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Inquisitor Tremayne
07-21-2008, 01:58 PM
What level of realism do you bring to your Sci-Fi/futuristic games?

And what form does it take?

Why?

Has it worked out for good or ill?

michaeljearley
07-21-2008, 02:15 PM
The few times I've run or played in Future/Sci-Fi games I've tried to bring as much realism as possible.
My responses have been neutral to bad, which is why I prever meadivel fanasty.

Webhead
07-21-2008, 02:20 PM
As a quick cop-out, I prefer not to worry overly much about "realism" in most sci-fi games. This is primarly for 2 reasons:

1) I value the action and adventure over the small stuff. A laser gun works because it does and exactly why it works is generally unimportant beyond the basic "insert batteries here, pull trigger". I try to keep the focus on the characters' decisions as what drives the story and avoid the "any problem can be solved with enough techno-babble" mentality. More important to me than "how it works" is "what you use it for".

2) When I immerse myself in science fiction, I want to indulge the "fiction" and feel like I am in a different and fantastic place that should feel more "surreal" than real. Aliens with improbable physiologies, obscure reality-bending technologies, mystical or psychic forces...all of these are the hallmarks of some good, clean, adventurous sci-fi fun!

I have my own fascinations with more "real" or "hard" sci-fi (I even owned and was intrigued by Transhuman Space at one time), but in-game, the realism is generally more detail than I care to enforce, and I prefer to get away from the rigidity and open myself up to something more wild and fantastic anyway.

shilar
07-23-2008, 04:11 AM
I run the gamut. Sometimes I want realism sometimes I want spelljamer helms. It's all about who I'm playing with if the group wants it gritty and real I stick to plausible physics If they want high adventure I have Robotech, Starwars and Spelljamer.

Skunkape
07-23-2008, 07:20 AM
I try to include some realism in my Sci-Fi games, but I generally don't sweat the details to much, a maneuver drive works because it works, and I don't worry to much about the science behind it. I've run games where you have to spin the space ship to get gravity and also run games where you have some sort of artificial gravity.

Generally with all my games, I try not to let the fun of the game suffer for the rules.

So far, I never have any problems finding players for my games.

Inquisitor Tremayne
07-25-2008, 11:25 AM
I tend to avoid all the "science" behind the tech in my Sci-Fi games (mostly Star Wars).

Any sort of realism I bring into the game comes in the form of the story. This usually takes the form of tough decisions that have to be made and other moral dilemmas.

Arch Lich Thoth-Amon
07-26-2008, 04:11 AM
I tend to avoid all the "science" behind the tech in my Sci-Fi games (mostly Star Wars).

Any sort of realism I bring into the game comes in the form of the story. This usually takes the form of tough decisions that have to be made and other moral dilemmas.
Realism is great just as long as you avoid the *detailed* science in your game. So i would have to agree with Inquisitor Tremayne on this one.

My SciFi game of choice? Traveller. Though i do had elements from the other great SciFi games out there for flavor.

Thoth-Amon

Arch Lich Thoth-Amon
07-26-2008, 04:15 AM
I try to include some realism in my Sci-Fi games, but I generally don't sweat the details to much, a maneuver drive works because it works, and I don't worry to much about the science behind it. I've run games where you have to spin the space ship to get gravity and also run games where you have some sort of artificial gravity.

Generally with all my games, I try not to let the fun of the game suffer for the rules.

So far, I never have any problems finding players for my games.
I've done this also. Usually an antiquated craft with older gravity devices. Nothing wrong with antiquated when matched up with futuristic campaigns.

Thoth-Amon

Giddoen
07-27-2008, 01:36 PM
What level of realism do you bring to your Sci-Fi/futuristic games?

***I like high realism in my games, I like to run sci-fi games in GURPs as I feel the game system really sets a realistic feel to the life and death struggle in the far future of my games***

And what form does it take?

***The form is usally a Transhumanis type setting where money is king and death is cheap! Another reason I like GURPs rules for this type of setting is that modern weapons in GURPs is/are very lethal and a good hit will usally spell certain death. I prefer players to think before acting and to be wise in their adventuring! You know the bad guys have the same firepower as you do and a laser bolt thru the dome will kill you just as well as it will kill them!:cool:***



Why?

***I think if you give the players a vested intrest in their characters lives and dealings (eg. plot and story) they will take ownership of the setting and not just try to solve everything with a guass rifle! ***:biggrin:

Has it worked out for good or ill?

***for the good I think, when I was running the players loved the game!***

nijineko
07-27-2008, 05:41 PM
my hallmark standard for sci-fi is andre norton, the lensman, and a few other beloved reads. as such, they tend towards introspection and space opera heroics depending on the situation. it starts blending the line into fantasy anyhow... after all, any sufficently advanced magic is indistiguishable.... ;D (to borrow a phrase)

tesral
08-01-2008, 10:50 AM
Realism? I play Star Trek.

The more important consideration is consistency. If tailoron rays turned you blue last time it better turn you blue this time. The exact explanation for the gee wizz factors is less important that "keeping it real". Making sure your world works the same way every time.

Law Dog
08-02-2008, 02:04 PM
Realism level all depends on what type of sci-fi we're going for. Cinematic Sci-Fi should be over the top, where something more traveller like should sling closer to reality.