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View Full Version : Would you get a cyber-jack?



Farcaster
10-19-2006, 05:07 PM
If technology took a giant leap forward and cyber-jacks were available tomorrow, would you signup to get one implanted? What if the maker of the the cyber-jack was Microsoft?

For those who might not know what I am talking about, the idea of a cyber-jack is popular in near-future science fiction games. A cyber-jack is basically a port that is connected directly to your brain so that all you have to do is "plug-in," and your mind can literally surf the cyber-net waves -- no keyboard, no monitor, just a straight up direct connection.

Moritz
10-19-2006, 09:16 PM
If technology took a giant leap forward and cyber-jacks were available tomorrow, would you signup to get one implanted? What if the maker of the the cyber-jack was Microsoft?

For those who might not know what I am talking about, the idea of a cyber-jack is popular in near-future science fiction games. A cyber-jack is basically a port that is connected directly to your brain so that all you have to do is "plug-in," and your mind can literally surf the cyber-net waves -- no keyboard, no monitor, just a straight up direct connection.

Why not, nothing else can hurt my credit - hell, it may even help it. :)

And yeah, I'm talking about that chip to be inserted with all your banking information etc.

Farcaster
10-19-2006, 11:05 PM
I just can't see myself doing it. It would be cool as hell--wait a second, hell isn't cool, what am I saying--but, I just couldn't take the nestea-plunge and let someone put something in my head. What happens when it crashes? and what about those famous "memory dumps" that happen when Windows dies? Ack!

ronpyatt
10-20-2006, 10:03 AM
I'd go for the wireless model with optional expansions. Technology advances so much, so quickly, that I'd have to wait for version 2.1 or later to work out the bugs and get the better features.

Any aversion to this technology would soon pass, but there are always those that hold out. I know some people that refuse to have anything to do with a computer. Back in the day there were those that wanted nothing to do with those evil printed books. Why use paper when stone tablets work so much better? Not to mention Letters. There were those that knew letters and the alphabet would never catch on.
I read that last year (Apr/2005) the technology was used in a successful test that allowed a machine to read a person's mind to the degree that the machine could tell if you were looking at vertical lines or horizontal lines. It's pretty basic, but it's a step in what many would call a very scary direction.

Skunkape
10-20-2006, 01:50 PM
I'd have to go with a wireless model as well, but I think I'd be waiting for one 2 or 3 versions down the road, waiting for the bugs to get worked out as well. But I'd have to make sure the damn thing couldn't write data into my brain only read data!

Edit: Oh and that would only be data I allowed it to read!

TheSmartestLemming
10-20-2006, 07:23 PM
I've got to say that I've always liked the idea of it ever since I started playing Cyber Punk, and I would definitely pick one up, wireless or not. I do have to agree with everyone else out there and say that I would probably not be an early adopter, however I do think that I would pick it up earlier than most. I also kind of like the idea of having an actual plug in port rather than wireless, first of all because of the ascetic appeal, and also because of the ability I would have to drop the connection by simply unplugging.

Moritz
10-21-2006, 09:12 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wetware

This is a good jump-off point for information on wetware.

I also remember something on the discovery channel (back when it was actually about science and discovery instead of motorcycle and house builders) that illustrated something about how neural tissues actually bonded/grew onto a microchip and utilized its pathways. The experiment took place in a lab with stem cell to neurological tissues.

But be it known, that if the religious reich has their way, we'll never have stem cell research to develop this technology to any functionality or purpose.
So if we actually want to be able to jack into the internet using wetware, then vote for science and progress, not mythology.

Farcaster
10-21-2006, 11:12 AM
"So if we actually want to be able to jack into the internet using wetware, then vote for science and progress, not mythology."

-- Political ad paid for by the Cyberpunks FTW Foundation.

Shield
10-25-2006, 01:56 PM
I don't think I will be getting this if it is invented in my lifetime. I believe the human body is flawless in its design already. I do not think implants and plugs are much needed.

Moritz
10-26-2006, 10:17 AM
I believe the human body is flawless in its design already.

Flawless? Dude, have you looked around lately? Have you not seen the Introns and Exons? How about the disease, disorder, dysfunction, normal variants (hypo, a, hyper, mega -stenic), obesity, sloth, mental issues, birth defects, or decay, etc etc etc?

If the human body was truly flawless, then we wouldn't have flaws, nor would we be vulnerable to said conditions. We would be a being of pure energy without disruption.

Nah there ain't no flawless going on around here, we've got another few million years of evolutionary cooking to go.

As a side note, if you're speaking of the Innate, that's just an idea that the body may have about perfection, but see the line above, maybe one day in the year 4.6 million CE. That is if we've not killed ourselves off yet.

Shield
10-27-2006, 03:03 PM
Well maybe perfection does not mean immune to disease and other maladies. People die. Any changes for better in the life cycle of humans would throw off the balance of the world.

mathogre
10-27-2006, 03:20 PM
Absolutely I'd - well, I'd certainly consider one. My interest however would be in reprogramming my own brain, the ultimate body hack. Imagine thinking faster, better, and more accurately. Imagine if the quality of the thinking could be improved.

If Microsoft built it? Despite being a hardcore Linux user, I'd still consider it.

RAMBOWOLF
10-31-2006, 05:24 AM
Not all technology is always good. i would wait a while see how it goes then decide. kinda like lasiks at first they were messing peoples eyes up now that rarely happens.I have to Wait and see where it went.

technophile
10-31-2006, 05:00 PM
Well maybe perfection does not mean immune to disease and other maladies. People die. Any changes for better in the life cycle of humans would throw off the balance of the world.
Just like they did when life expectancies went from ~40 to ~80?

In other words: not really. The thing to note is that as life expectancy goes up, generally you find that the birth rate goes down. People who are expecting to live a long time, and who aren't expecting to need bunches of children to support them in their old age, generally have few (or no) children. (This is currently Europe's problem; the birth rate in many countries is actually below the rate needed for replacement.)

I'm also not sure what you mean by "balance of the world". If you mean that we won't be able to grow enough food to feed everyone, again that's unlikely. For one thing, we already produce huge surpluses of food that just rot in silos and warehouses (or are thrown away). The reason we have starving people is not because we can't produce the food, it's because we can't get the food to those who need it (due to foolish legal restrictions (like banning GM food), or corrupt governments, or war/natural disaster situations). There's no reason to think that we'll be unable to produce even more food in the future, as technology continues to advance.

Not to say there aren't challenges associated with technological advances, because there are a lot. But it's far from clear that major advances in medicine and technology necessarily lead to bad scenarios rather than good ones.

PhishStyx
01-25-2007, 10:50 PM
I believe the human body is flawless in its design already.

I think your idea of flawless and mine are extremely different.

Frankly, "flawless" doesn't involve cancer and never will.

dark77778
02-04-2007, 12:17 PM
^_^ Good call Styx. Personally, I wouldn't mind getting one as I've always found the idea kinda cool. I'd wait until all the bugs were fixed in the system though. I'd prefer to get something foolproof in my brain as opposed to something experimental. Still, I think I'd rather go with outer cyberknetics as opposed to inner.

Farcaster
02-04-2007, 02:55 PM
I'd prefer to get something foolproof in my brain as opposed to something experimental. Still, I think I'd rather go with outer cyberknetics as opposed to inner.

Sadly, I don't think technology will every be 'foolproof'. And I have a hard enough time avoiding the flu every year without having to worry about computer viruses infecting my brain on top of that :eek:

Apart from loosing a limb and getting a replacement, I don't think I'd go with other cybernetic replacements either. Presumably, doing so would involve some loss of feeling. Yeah, I'd probably have to take a pass on that too.

ghost_runner
02-04-2007, 05:31 PM
My answer, yes and no. I would love to have one, but not if Microshaft was the one that put it out. I'm a linux user, anything in my person would have to have an open source background, because once implanted, I want to be free to modify/upgrade and use it however I want, not however they want.

Batarena
02-08-2007, 09:10 PM
As far as having something interact with my brain without my total control, no way. I think if technology developed to the point that such a jack were possible and actually worked - there'd be a wireless version that'd be more foolproof. A pair of glasses you'd wear or something.

Farcaster
02-09-2007, 12:05 PM
Possibly. But, I imagine technology that interacted with the brain through the skin somehow would be more difficult and far off than one that has been directly implanted. But! That is a good idea for a more far-future invention. :)

spotlight
02-11-2007, 03:18 PM
Well, folks. I have carefully considered all the pros and cons mentioned here as well as a few if my own ideas. I would not get a jack. At least untill it proved absalutly nessasary. Even now, I have only recently went to the expence of getting a cell phone, about a month ago. As it is, I do not just turn it off when I don't need it, I actually remove the battery. Why?? I still have trouble trusting the mega-corps and the Gov'ment NOT to act like Big Brother. Yeah, I know, I have played to much INWO from Steve Jackson Games as well as Paranoia. Long live the Secret Masters of Gamedom!!!

Moritz
03-19-2007, 09:57 AM
Maybe they'll have cyber jacks to help with spelling?

PhishStyx
03-19-2007, 11:55 AM
Maybe they'll have cyber jacks to help with spelling?

No kidding, I'm sure that was intended to be "guv'mint!" :D

ronpyatt
03-31-2007, 07:36 AM
Typing out an entire novel in hours or days? How fast is the speed of thought?

gdmcbride
04-01-2007, 02:05 AM
Typing out an entire novel in hours or days? How fast is the speed of thought?

It's not the speed of thought that's relevant for writing novels. Its the speed of good ideas.

Gary

fmitchell
04-01-2007, 01:15 PM
It's not the speed of thought that's relevant for writing novels. Its the speed of good ideas.

Actually, it's the speed of choosing words to express those good ideas, so if the words move faster than your fingers something for slow typists would help. On the other hand, wiring my brain into a machine seems kind of drastic ... especially after watching the Cyberman episodes of the new Doctor Who.

Digital Arcanist
04-08-2007, 08:41 PM
I would be one of the first ones to get it. I would not however consider getting an implant from Microsoft. I'm thinking underground operation running something like Ubuntu with lots of open-source applications. I do think wireless is a horrible idea. When I take away the physical connection I am 100% safe from viruses and hacking. Wireless presents too much of a threat.

shilar
07-10-2007, 02:31 PM
Got to agree with Digital Arcanist on this one. Microsoft has to many bug problems. And wires make me feel just a little safer.

Inquisitor Tremayne
07-19-2007, 12:14 PM
I'm gonna say NO!

A friend of mine had broken his arm in several places. He had a huge contraption on his arm for months that included expensive medical gear. The hospital or whoever, we assume, planted a gps micro chip in him or their gear. He didn't own a phone but they would call him at various locations. Once when they called he asked them how they knew where he was and they said they had ways of keeping track of their merchandise. (He hadn't paid his bill yet so they kept calling him.) All of us that were with him backed away from him slowly and looked at him weird. It was really creepy.

Scary, yes!

All organic for me please.

Ed Zachary
07-19-2007, 12:22 PM
I've read 1984, and the USA PATRIOT Act.

It's scary how reality follows fiction.

Farcaster
07-19-2007, 12:42 PM
It's not the speed of thought that's relevant for writing novels. Its the speed of good ideas.

True, but there is certainly one truism in writing that what you write is almost never exactly as you pictured it in your head. But, wouldn't it be interesting if you could somehow share that untold proto-story in your head without the artificial construct of language. I suppose in many ways it would be like playing a movie in your mind, but a movie is bound by what it can convey in sight and sound. A story shared this way would be able to engage all of the "reader's" senses and allow the audience to experience the story in the same exciting way the writer imagined it.

Talaisan
10-15-2007, 10:42 AM
Umm... Yes to jack, no to microsoft. Reason : Vista, the virus you pay for.

Drohem
11-27-2007, 05:45 PM
Hell no!

Organic all the way!

ronpyatt
11-28-2007, 10:48 AM
I agree. Organic jacks would be the best.

Drohem
11-28-2007, 11:19 AM
I agree. Organic jacks would be the best.

hehe...let me clarify: I would not get a cyberjack. I would like to keep my body free of (or as much as possible) foreign objects.

ronpyatt
11-28-2007, 01:48 PM
As much as possible is the key phrase there.

Then that begs the question: Would a jack made from your own DNA qualify as a non-foreign object? Especially if it was grown right in your own body? Sounds like a cancer, doesn't it? (Scary):eek:

If that's not your cup of tea then what would it take for any of the "No" voters to be more willing to accept a jack? Or what kind of jack would be acceptable? Anything close?



Thought experiment for the potential cyber-world. How foreign is foreign?
We breath air and ingest food and water, which introduces all sorts of foreign objects into our systems. We constantly take massive doses of radiation. Our bodies are bombarded with pressure from the atmosphere and stressed with gravity every time we move. Sound vibrations wrack our bodies with constant frequency impacts. So, foreign is part of what we are. We take foreign in and use it all the time.

Drohem
11-28-2007, 01:58 PM
hmm...very good questions.

If the cyber-jack was bio-organic and created from my own DNA, then that might give me pause for thought.

I understand that very good arguments could be made that a cyber-jack is natural since man created it, etc. This will only lead to an enviable discussion on religion vs. science, and I want to avoid that ball of wax :).

My decision to avoid any kind of cyber-jack is based more on a gut feeling. Personally, I would want to maintain my natural humanity as much as possible.

PhishStyx
11-28-2007, 02:13 PM
Clearly my friend, you need to consider your TRANShumanity!

http://www.transhumanism.org/index.php/WTA/index/ (http://transhuman.org)

Drohem
11-28-2007, 02:22 PM
Clearly my friend, you need to consider your TRANShumanity!

http://www.transhumanism.org/index.php/WTA/index/

LOL!

MortonStromgal
01-19-2008, 01:21 AM
I would probably have to... I don't think they would let me turtle forever. I also don't see Microsoft making them. Philips Heartstream maybe, I know Microsoft is trying to break into medical but with the zune, 360, and other newer hardware projects that have been less favorable than expected I think they will be more careful in the future.

Mulsiphix
01-19-2008, 02:36 AM
In response to the original question of this thread, I would but not if Microsoft made it. I would want one but unless it was created by a company I had some level of trust for, I would hold off until somebody I did trust put one out.

nijineko
01-19-2008, 10:48 AM
i would have to go with an induction model with a mechanical timed cutout. wireless is too easy to mess with. and i wouldn't want someone packet-sniffing my thoughts. and a physical port has some serious medical side-effects.

Mulsiphix
01-19-2008, 12:48 PM
and a physical port has some serious medical side-effects.In theory :cool:. You can never have enough ports ;)

nijineko
01-21-2008, 11:11 AM
hence induction. bypasses need for ports entirely. ^^

tesral
01-21-2008, 07:34 PM
Wireless encryption would have to get a lot better. With the direction computers and networks are going I doubt we will ever see anything like the classic cyberjack that you physically had to jack. An induction system as mentioned would likely be the closest one would ever get.

Would I get one? Not until I see the effects is has on others. I consider learning form the mistakes of others to be the ideal way to gain experience. As to Microsoft? Not on your life.

Mulsiphix
01-21-2008, 11:54 PM
I think we'll see a cyberjack before we ever seen something wireless that does the same thing. Wireless transmissions are far to hard to control, regardless of the security. Physical connections are as hard to protect but I believe that in the end it is a much more realistic to protect data being sent over something physical versus wireless.