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MooseAlmighty
05-23-2008, 10:37 PM
OK everyone's taste do change to some degree as we grow, mature, or simply find new authors that engage your emotions and/or intellect with new ideas and great story telling. And you can enjoy a light read anytime!

Some books you will always remember with fondness because you loved them at the time, but trying to reread them now can be a bit painful:rolleyes:

When I bought a new house last year and decided what books to move vs donate, I started flipping through lots of paperbacks that had accumulated over the years. A number of gaming based novels didn't make it. The Horseclans series - well I kept it but man... I guess at 14 they were pretty cool.

Webhead
05-23-2008, 10:59 PM
I face the same thing with the cartoons of my youth. He-Man, GI Joe, Space Ghost, The Herculoids, Voltron...when I was a child, these were pure awesomeness. But try watching them as an adult...yikes!

Dimthar
05-23-2008, 11:23 PM
The first novel I remember reading (not any Disney-Comic-TV Version) was "Neverending Story", perhaps I was 10 or so … (I am pretty sure it was not the first story I read, but is the one that I remember that was not a “modified” version). So time went by and read things like Call of the Wild/White Fang, Jules Verne, Emilio Salgari, Alexandre Dumas, etc.

LotR and Chronicles of Dragonlace were my first fantasy novels around my 17s, along with some SciFi Clockwork Orange, Foundation Series and some Michael Crichton novels.

In my early 20’s I became a “Nationalist” and moved to latin-american authors such as Garcia Marquez, Vargas Llosa, Isabel Allende, Laura Esquivel and Borges. Oh! And yes, Pablo Neruda’s poems have that special effect on women (as in the movie “Il Postino).

I guess Neil Gaiman got me back, read most of them, read the Robot Series, Animal Farm and 1984. Thanks to Pirates of the Caribbean I read the “Captain Alatriste Series”
The WoD pushed me to Interview with the Vampire->Queen of the Damned.

Now I am trying some Classics, last book was the “Jungle Book”, my favorite was Rikki-Tikki-Tavi.

.

tesral
05-25-2008, 12:19 AM
I can't say they really have. I still enjoy my old favorites. I recently reread "The White Dragon" and enjoyed it every bit as much as the first time.

I have gotten out of the reading habit due to poor eyesight for the longest time. Glasses corrected I am getting myself back into the habit by reading old favorites.

agoraderek
05-25-2008, 04:02 PM
when i was a kid, all things fantasy. lieber, tolkein, donaldson, aspirin, poul anderson (three hearts and three lions is still a fave, the d&d troll and the "pharisees" from queen of the demonweb pits were lifted whole cloth from that book).

in high school, i still read fantasy, but my tastes veered more towards "literature" type fiction and a lot of non-fiction, particularly history and philosophy.

now, i mix it up a bit, i'll read some fantasy, some modern lit type stuff (bellow and greene are faves right now) and non-fiction. with my schedule, however, it takes me a week or two to read a book when i used to be able to burn through one a day...

tesral
05-25-2008, 08:56 PM
when i was a kid, all things fantasy. lieber, tolkein, donaldson, aspirin, poul anderson (three hearts and three lions is still a fave, the d&d troll and the "pharisees" from queen of the demonweb pits were lifted whole cloth from that book).

in high school, i still read fantasy, but my tastes veered more towards "literature" type fiction and a lot of non-fiction, particularly history and philosophy.

now, i mix it up a bit, i'll read some fantasy, some modern lit type stuff (bellow and greene are faves right now) and non-fiction. with my schedule, however, it takes me a week or two to read a book when i used to be able to burn through one a day...

We just lost Bob Asprin. He died Thursday. We don't have the casue of death yet. the old Gang from A2 and I are in a bit of a state of shock.

Poul Anderson was a regular at the Micihigan cons. We miss him too. In died 2001, it doesn't feel like that long.

agoraderek
05-26-2008, 05:05 AM
We just lost Bob Asprin. He died Thursday. We don't have the casue of death yet. the old Gang from A2 and I are in a bit of a state of shock.

wow, i didnt know...

the "myth" books and the thieve's world books really shaped how i approached a lot of my gaming. i stole the "d-hopper" as a high level magic item for my homebrew campaign...

robert aspirin, thank you for years of escape and for always putting a smile on my face. long live skeeve the great!

cplmac
05-26-2008, 09:22 AM
I would have to sat that yes my reading tastes changed once I was introduced to D&D 2E in 1991. Before that, I would not have given a thought of reading anything like it.

tesral
05-26-2008, 08:32 PM
I would have to sat that yes my reading tastes changed once I was introduced to D&D 2E in 1991. Before that, I would not have given a thought of reading anything like it.

Fiction vs non-fiction. D&D game books fall into non-fiction.

nijineko
05-31-2008, 07:13 PM
i started with hardy boys. swiftly ran through the entire children's mystery section... then branched into sci-fi. finally fantasy. throughout i've had occasionaly forays into almost everything else.

agoraderek
06-01-2008, 06:12 PM
I face the same thing with the cartoons of my youth. He-Man, GI Joe, Space Ghost, The Herculoids, Voltron...when I was a child, these were pure awesomeness. But try watching them as an adult...yikes!

i tried to watch some of the original translation "battle of the planets" on youtube the other day. it was painful...

tesral
06-01-2008, 11:35 PM
i tried to watch some of the original translation "battle of the planets" on youtube the other day. it was painful...

Loony Tunes are still as good as ever. I got another box of the Gold collection. "They must be mine!"

Webhead
06-02-2008, 09:53 AM
Loony Tunes are still as good as ever. I got another box of the Gold collection. "They must be mine!"

Agreed. Bugs, Daffy, Sylvester, Foghorn Leghorn, Wylie Coyote and the others still make me giggle after all these years. Some things never go out of style.

As far as my early reading goes, the first “books” I remember getting into (besides Dr. Seuss and other children’s books) was the Encyclopedia Brown series. I also frequently borrowed Eastman and Laird's original black-and-white Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles comics from the local library and must have read them a dozen times or more. From there it didn’t take long before I began reading fantasy and sci-fi from The Hobbit to Star Wars.

tesral
06-02-2008, 10:47 AM
Agreed. Bugs, Daffy, Sylvester, Foghorn Leghorn, Wylie Coyote and the others still make me giggle after all these years. Some things never go out of style.

As far as my early reading goes, the first “books” I remember getting into (besides Dr. Seuss and other children’s books) was the Encyclopedia Brown series.

I have some experience with Brown. It is good stuff.

The secret to Loony toons or for that matter anything that appeals to all ages? Don't write down. If you look at the stuff that even older children hate it is all written for the age level. The Loony Toons were not written for children. They were intended as the shorts between the features the way movie houses used to be run. You paid your ticket and waked in. It might be the middle of the film. You watched to the end, there were a couple of short, a newsreel and a second film. More same and you left when you got to where you came in. All content.

Well because they were intended for adult consumption, but must meet the standards of the day and be entertaining to children as well, the toons are not written for children. Result they meet the goal of being entertaining to all. Kids dig the slapstick, adults get the more subtle jokes that go right by the kiddies.

Lesson: If you want material that lasts, don't write down.

cplmac
06-10-2008, 02:07 PM
Agreed. Bugs, Daffy, Sylvester, Foghorn Leghorn, Wylie Coyote and the others still make me giggle after all these years. Some things never go out of style.

As far as my early reading goes, the first “books” I remember getting into (besides Dr. Seuss and other children’s books) was the Encyclopedia Brown series. I also frequently borrowed Eastman and Laird's original black-and-white Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles comics from the local library and must have read them a dozen times or more. From there it didn’t take long before I began reading fantasy and sci-fi from The Hobbit to Star Wars.


Not sure which thread, (to lazy at this time to research it), but if you find it, there is a discussion about the coyote and roadrunner, of which started from my town's name.

GC13
06-10-2008, 02:25 PM
My reading tastes have been funny. Going into second grade my teacher had to work to get me to read fiction at all; she was largely successful and for a great many years I loved to read fiction. After a while I became a true Internet geek and stopped "feeling like" reading. Well, now there are things I want to read, but it's all nonfiction again: I tried reading fiction, but there's something about the uncertainty of plot twists that kills me and makes me not enjoy reading it. Nonfiction is, however, alive and well again in my mind, I am pleased to say.

On television shows: Darkwing Duck. Loved that as a kid. Got the DVDs and watched them again. They're still cool and I like watching them, though sheesh, I remembered how arrogant DW was, but I didn't realize his arrogance was a vital plot point for almost every single episode. :lol:

Then there are classics like Garfield and Friends that are just as good as ever (though a lot of it is the already discussed Loony Toons factor, which may be playing somewhat in DW as well).

Freejack
06-15-2008, 05:59 PM
Perhaps. I recall really enjoying The Hardy Boys. But I was also reading The Hobbit and Lord of The Rings. I read a lot of Andre Norton books which are, for the most part geared to young adults, and truly enjoyed them. But I've read and really enjoyed the Pern, Crystal Singer, Ship that Sang, and all the others. I picked up Restoree by Anne McCaffery years and years ago and kept buying her books.

So maybe they've matured a little.

I still enjoy many of the Horseclans books but even back then when I got towards the last couple I was scratching my head. And the Cats of the Horseclans (or whatever it was) had me seriously going WTF. I couldn't even finish reading it.

Robert Asprin (RIP)'s Myth Adventures and Thieves World books were others that I still enjoy even though the last couple of Myth books were a little... well "off-topic" maybe :)

I love to read. My wife keeps trying to get me to get rid of my books but I just can't. I've weeded out the ones I didn't like that much and what's left has fertilized my imagination. One of these days I'll cave in to her requests to purge the books and I know I'll regret doing it. Until then, I'll keep reading and enjoying them.

Carl

tesral
06-15-2008, 07:26 PM
Perhaps. I recall really enjoying The Hardy Boys. But I was also reading The Hobbit and Lord of The Rings. I read a lot of Andre Norton books which are, for the most part geared to young adults, and truly enjoyed them. But I've read and really enjoyed the Pern, Crystal Singer, Ship that Sang, and all the others. I picked up Restoree by Anne McCaffery years and years ago and kept buying her books.

Restoree is one of the odder ones. Interesting you started with that.



I still enjoy many of the Horseclans books but even back then when I got towards the last couple I was scratching my head. And the Cats of the Horseclans (or whatever it was) had me seriously going WTF. I couldn't even finish reading it.

I met Robert Adams in 1977 at BaltiCon 14 (Ann McCaffery was the GoH BTW) A Cat of Silvery Hue had just come out. I'd never heard of him or his books. But he fed me real food (I was broke as a church mouse) and talked to me as an equal. I haven't read the whole of he Horseclans series. But I respected the man.




Robert Asprin (RIP)'s Myth Adventures and Thieves World books were others that I still enjoy even though the last couple of Myth books were a little... well "off-topic" maybe :)

That was a punch in the soul. I know Bob drank like a fish. But he isn't that much older than I am. It was a shock. I was talking with Rich Tucholka last Friday. He wasn't as shocked, but he has heard more from Bob than I have in recent years. Fact is we are none of us old dogs getting any younger.

I remember the years before he had sold that first book. The Capture slide show, talking about the shared world concept that became the Thieves World series. I treasure the copy of Another Fine Myth with the Kelly Freas cover that Bob signed for me. I use to be able to identify all the Devels on the back. It's been a few years.

Freejack
06-15-2008, 08:14 PM
Restoree is one of the odder ones. Interesting you started with that.

I think it was the bright green cover. Colorful things catch my eye :) I bought it some time in the 70's. Then it was the protagonist. I'd been reading Andre Norton and several of hers have women or girls as the main character.


I met Robert Adams in 1977 at BaltiCon 14 (Ann McCaffery was the GoH BTW) A Cat of Silvery Hue had just come out. I'd never heard of him or his books. But he fed me real food (I was broke as a church mouse) and talked to me as an equal. I haven't read the whole of he Horseclans series. But I respected the man.

I just checked out the listing. The two Memories books (A Man Called Milo Morai and The Memories of Milo Morai), especially where Milo was interacting with the guy who showed them how to create Yurt's was interesting. The last book, The Clan of the Cats was the one I couldn't finish. In part because it seemed to simply be a rehash of the "short story" about how he hooked up with cats. It was like he'd lost his muse and was starting in on cashing in on the series. I won't comment on the part I think is where I had to put the book down because it's been a while.

The series is good and I'd like it if he could have continued in the vein. Bili the Axe and of course everyone's favorite, Geros :)


That was a punch in the soul. I know Bob drank like a fish. But he isn't that much older than I am. It was a shock. I was talking with Rich Tucholka last Friday. He wasn't as shocked, but he has heard more from Bob than I have in recent years. Fact is we are none of us old dogs getting any younger.

I remember the years before he had sold that first book. The Capture slide show, talking about the shared world concept that became the Thieves World series. I treasure the copy of Another Fine Myth with the Kelly Freas cover that Bob signed for me. I use to be able to identify all the Devels on the back. It's been a few years.

The funny part is that I picked up the first three books in part because it was Robert Aspirin but also because it was the Starblaze series and had Phil Foglio as the artist. I've been a fan of Phil since The Dragon days (Phil and Dixie) so it was a treat.

Carl

agoraderek
06-15-2008, 08:31 PM
i never really got into anne mccaffery or piers anthony, for some reason.

i do find myself reading less and less fantasy as i get older, also. strange, as it was always my favorite genre, by far, for a long time. now, other than tying up loose ends from series i've been reading for a while, i find myself reading more, i dont know, "literature"? type books. classics, algonquin round table authors, burgess, grene, bellow, stuff like that

tesral
06-15-2008, 11:50 PM
The funny part is that I picked up the first three books in part because it was Robert Aspirin but also because it was the Starblaze series and had Phil Foglio as the artist. I've been a fan of Phil since The Dragon days (Phil and Dixie) so it was a treat.

Phil is another nice guy. I have run into him exactly at one con. And yea, he looks like his drawing of himself.

I have two of his very early efforts. The Capture Coloring Book. Which is the art from the slide show and Bob's script in book form. And The TrekCon Reports. Which is a total hoot not in part becasue I know a lot of the people involved. One has to remember the Star Trek cons of the late 70's to truly understand. Both are slim little booklets that sold for a couple of bucks "back in the day". I cherish them now.



i never really got into anne mccaffery or piers anthony, for some reason.

That is why the bookstore is full of books. I can't get passed Donaldson or Lacky myself. Both leave me cold.

agoraderek
06-16-2008, 12:35 AM
That is why the bookstore is full of books. I can't get passed Donaldson or Lacky myself. Both leave me cold.

i couldnt stand the covenant books either, but some of donaldson's short stories were pretty good. never read lacky, though.

RivenNookRavenClaw
06-16-2008, 02:09 PM
Since I taught public school my reading tastes started to change. Seeing children struggle just made my tastes different.

I have gone back to reading tween fiction that a romantic partner once introduced me to. I have read Harry Potter but to be honest at the time the only reason I did so was because women my own age were enthralled with it plus work colleges that were thirty years older than me.

Nowadays I go through the tween stacks looking for the familiar and unfamiliar. I am going to read more stuff by the person that wrote "The Chocholat War", that story still rings so heartbreakingly true to me when I see children cajoled into selling Skittles on subway platforms.

Additionally I just have more "courage" regarding depression non-fiction books. I feel an obligation but also a joy in tackling difficult books whereas before I just loved science non-fiction and escape fantasy.

RivenNookRavenClaw
06-16-2008, 02:14 PM
Perhaps. I recall really enjoying The Hardy Boys. But I was also reading The Hobbit and Lord of The Rings. I read a lot of Andre Norton books which are, for the most part geared to young adults, and truly enjoyed them. But I've read and really enjoyed the Pern, Crystal Singer, Ship that Sang, and all the others. I picked up Restoree by Anne McCaffery years and years ago and kept buying her books.
......
Robert Asprin (RIP)'s Myth Adventures and Thieves World books were others that I still enjoy even though the last couple of Myth books were a little... well "off-topic" maybe :)


Carl

I am somewhat embarrassed with how many times I read the Adventures of "The Great Skeeve" and how long it took me to understand the simple pun that Tandy stood for "Candy"....

still what about those quotes?

I still remember "If you can't dazzle them with dexterity baffle them with bull." which is actually a W.C. Fields quote that I believe Aspirin attributed to Professor Moriatry of Sherlock Homes.

I was a poor reader though starting out in Kindergarten and while "Reading Is Fundamental" (RIF) was pushing the HARDY Boys I simple could not understand the books...I hated mysteries at the time because the Boys and Girls could solve the puzzles before reaching the end of the book. The only time I liked Nancy Drew was when she was on T.V. because she was hot.

RivenNookRavenClaw
06-16-2008, 02:20 PM
The first novel I remember reading (not any Disney-Comic-TV Version) was "Neverending Story", perhaps I was 10 or so … (I am pretty sure it was not the first story I read, but is the one that I remember that was not a “modified” version). So time went by and read things like Call of the Wild/White Fang, Jules Verne, Emilio Salgari, Alexandre Dumas, etc.

LotR and Chronicles of Dragonlace were my first fantasy novels around my 17s, along with some SciFi Clockwork Orange, Foundation Series and some Michael Crichton novels.

In my early 20’s I became a “Nationalist” and moved to latin-american authors such as Garcia Marquez, Vargas Llosa, Isabel Allende, Laura Esquivel and Borges. Oh! And yes, Pablo Neruda’s poems have that special effect on women (as in the movie “Il Postino).

I guess Neil Gaiman got me back, read most of them, read the Robot Series, Animal Farm and 1984. Thanks to Pirates of the Caribbean I read the “Captain Alatriste Series”
The WoD pushed me to Interview with the Vampire->Queen of the Damned.

Now I am trying some Classics, last book was the “Jungle Book”, my favorite was Rikki-Tikki-Tavi.

.


I never could take poetry books although my teachers made me read them...later in life I appreciated the time it took me to struggle through some of those times but at the time "Leaves of Grass" by Whitman? just BORED me.

Ah well, Romeo and Juliet was a lot of fun though because

1) I thought both Romeo and Juliet were two biggest losers I had ever heard about
2) The priest taking Romeo's confession of undying love for Juliet had me on the floor

3) "Waiting for The Galactic Bus" and the "Snake Oil Wars" have Shakespeare alive in the after life commenting on his own plays including "Now that's a Romeo...that boy is pure Penis...he is perfect for the role..." and then laughing hysterically at all the English Majors new to the after life when they flinch because they now know that Shakespeare really was a middle class man, an earthy man, and not Byron in disguise or some other nobleman.