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Kilrex
03-31-2008, 03:41 PM
Title says it all. And I don't know how/if I can create one. I was just wondering what would be voted worst setting of all time. My money would be on Eberon and maybe a side bet on Spelljammer.

Frobozz
03-31-2008, 03:48 PM
Pah! Maztica... THAT was bad... at least SpellJammer was a unique concept; but come on... "Let's put Aztecs and Incas into Forgotten Realms!!" Please...

Farcaster
03-31-2008, 04:38 PM
What would be the list of candidates?

Kilrex
03-31-2008, 04:44 PM
Why not all of them? I love the Realms and hate Dragonlance, but others may feel differently.

All I can remember off top of head: Forgotten Realms, Greyhawk, Eberon, Planescape, Spelljammer, Dark Sun, Birthright, Ravenloft, and Dragonlance. I think I may have missed 1 or 2.

Wouldn't count Maztica, it may suck but is part of the Realms.

fmitchell
03-31-2008, 04:58 PM
Hollow World? Mystara? Blackmoor?

Frobozz
03-31-2008, 05:03 PM
Yea, true... darn, pick the worst out of that list? That's a tough call in my book, they all range from "mediocre" to "truly aweful" :p

cplmac
03-31-2008, 06:22 PM
What about all the stand alone campaigns that were not actually part of a "world" setting?

RealmsDM
03-31-2008, 08:17 PM
Lol... I remember buying a boxed set for Mystara on clearance sale at a Kay-Bee Toy store for like $2 many years ago...

WOW... did it suck... I mean really sucked... so bad it made me not want to play D&D anymore

tesral
03-31-2008, 08:38 PM
I've never actually played any of them. I mined the lot for stuff I liked, but used my own setting.

Frobozz
03-31-2008, 08:52 PM
One setting that irked me in particular was Forgotten Realms. At first, I liked it. It had a solid core, some well written backstory, good geography, etc. I got into the Forgotten Realms after a time, first with a campaign around the Dalelands... then, a later campaign... oh! Waterdeep sounds interesting, let's base it there...

Then the writers multiplied, and the sourcebooks went crazy, and every month, more and more stuff came out for the Forgotten Realms in far, far away areas from it's core. By the time 3rd edition D&D came out, most of the "important" stuff was happening about 2000 miles from the Dalelands involving groups and people and factions I never heard of, and could care less about... and who could forget god-awful Maztica...

Forgotten Realms turned into a "WAY too many cooks in the kitchen" complex. Too many writers writing bad books on too many settings and you got everything from Gods falling from the sky to a drow elf that puts a gleam in the eye of every munchkin.

And what of the Dalelands were it all began? It became a Forgotten Realm, just like the world's namesake.

tesral
03-31-2008, 09:03 PM
Too many writers writing bad books on too many settings and you got everything from Gods falling from the sky to a drow elf that puts a gleam in the eye of every munchkin.


Goood Ol' Drizzle Dustbin.

Oldgamer
03-31-2008, 09:08 PM
I'd have to say Eberon, I like Dragonlance, Forgotten Realms, and Greyhawk. I'm a little biased with Dragonlance though because it is the first world I played in that drew me in. But I've played the others and the above 3 rank top for me with Eberon being the last with the high magic, technology and the deplorable Warforged.

Frobozz
03-31-2008, 09:08 PM
Goood Ol' Drizzle Dustbin.

God, a character that no matter how "tragic" Salvatore tries to emphasize he is, you can't ever seem to shed a scrap of pity for him through book after book of awful prose. I somehow made it to book four before I sh**-canned that series.


I'm a little biased with Dragonlance though because it is the first world I played in that drew me in.

Dragonlance was fun; especially when you make it a crusade to kill the more annoying races of the world. Ahh... one of the rare instances where I was a player... Pirate Captain Mordecai Blight. I had a steward played by frat brother named "Crunchy" who was a dwarf. Kender and Gully Dwarves never lasted long in that campaign. One player who played a Kender has his last fateful encounter with Crunchy:

Kender: Got anything good to eat good Dwarf? I'm hungry!!
Crunchy: I got's me some Kender Jerky!
Kender: Ohh!!! I didn't know you knew any Kender who could make jerky! At least not on this trip!
Crunchy: *I* made the jerky!
Kender: ... but you're a Dwar....:(

tesral
03-31-2008, 09:17 PM
God, a character that no matter how "tragic" Salvatore tries to emphasize he is, you can't ever seem to shed a scrap of pity for him through book after book of awful prose. I somehow made it to book four before I sh**-canned that series.

A Mary Sue so perfect that Star Trek fan writers weep at their inadequate perfect characters.




Kender: Got anything good to eat good Dwarf? I'm hungry!!

Kender, becasue halflings (hobbits) were not annoying enough.

Frobozz
03-31-2008, 09:49 PM
Kender, becasue halflings (hobbits) were not annoying enough.


For us, Kender became the OTHER white meat! :biggrin:
YARR!!!

Webhead
03-31-2008, 11:46 PM
I've generally never cared much for any of the established D&D settings, with only two real exceptions: Dark Sun and Planescape.

Never really played in either of them except about a handful of random adventures in Dark Sun and one session of a friend's 3.5 game where we ended up in Sigil, but there were neat concepts to those settings that I liked.

I hate Forgotten Realms and have less than half a clue about most of the others, mostly from lack of interest.

My favorite setting was "Generica", the D&D campaign setting that the DM made up as the game went along. There was a dark, abandoned castle overrun by trolls just over the horizon because the DM said there was. 'Nuff said.

Oh, and I loved the old Gazetteer series which (if the DM cared enough) was supposed to be set in Mystara, but it was just as easily plug-and-play with "Generica".

cplmac
04-01-2008, 09:51 AM
For us, Kender became the OTHER white meat! :biggrin:
YARR!!!


Two questions.

1. Do they taste like draconians?

2. Is eating a kender like eating chinese take out, an hour later you are hungry again?

:lol:

Frobozz
04-01-2008, 10:10 AM
Two questions.

1. Do they taste like draconians?

2. Is eating a kender like eating chinese take out, an hour later you are hungry again?

:lol:

1. No, draconians, like all lizards (snake, dinosaur, dragon), taste like chicken, and they're a heck of a lot less greasy than gully dwarf. The one and only gully dwarf Crunchy cooked stained the pot.

2. Somewhat but in a different sense. When feeding a crew of 35, a little kender doesn't go a long way... :bounce: They're tasty with BBQ sauce too.

Mind you, the decision to eat the kender character came after he untied our treasure ship we were towing in the dead of night to "roam free with all the other ships" and after he thought it helpful to pass out buckets of oil to the crew to help extinguish the flaming pitch that was being shot at our ship.

Crunchy failed with the "shiny objects sitting as bait on the dire-bear trap" approach, so a more direct approach was taken... namely, the "throw sack over kender's head and toss into boiling broth bath" approach. Point of advice, if you're a pirate captain in the Dragonlance universe, make sure your stewpot has locking clamps on the lid. It helps for rough seas as well. Yarrr..... ;)

nijineko
04-01-2008, 03:42 PM
hmmmm. i haven't had the chance to read through them all. i would have to say that while i greatly enjoyed playing a minotaur and irda from the dragonlance setting, that i've never been fond of the setting. matzica irked me cause they got the native americans legends and history seriously messed up, even for a 'fantasy version'. hollow earth with it's restriction on using non-racial tech bugged me too. talk about railroading.

forgotten realms in general seemed too crowded and claustiphobic for me, but i loved some of the personalities, like the Wyrm That Hides in Blades. many of the prestige and classes were very setting specific, requiring more work than most to generalize to my satisfaction.

ravenloft, bleh. it's great as a limited demi-plane, but leave it to the lost and exiled, don't stick normals in there with them. =P not worth my time otherwise.

lahnkmar was interesting, spelljammer had some good concepts, but needs some serious tweaking. planescape would be great if they had covered more of the critical basic parts of a cosmology... and had a better cosmology. seriously bolted on feel. the conan and red sonja series needed help to fit into d&d. really, they are totally different worlds and all, should get their own setting.

dark sun, i never got to play, but also had some interesting concepts.

blackmoor and greyhawk (now in the same world) are probably my favorite. but then, i've always been fond of people's campaigns that make it as a world setting. i like to see what they did and how. and then i change everything i would do differently when i use it. ^^ ummm. i know i'm missing a few settings here....

birthright, i've never even read... can't say anything about it. eberron is fun, if you like your fantasy pulp-fiction fast forward china melville style. i liked the idea of warforged.

Frobozz
04-01-2008, 04:07 PM
I always felt that Spelljammer and Planescape should have been smoothly combined, and concentrate less on each individual setting (less on Sigil which I hated from day one, and less on the sci-fi aspects of spelljammer) and more on a "These are the planes, and this is the vehicle you can use to get around them quickly" approach.

Farcaster
04-01-2008, 05:24 PM
Why not all of them?

Well, because there are lots and lots of settings out there and a limited number of poll choices.

I added a poll on this thread based on settings mentioned already and a few extras that hadn't been brought up yet.

nijineko
04-01-2008, 05:32 PM
i might be mistaken, but i believe that the Ptolus setting is not officially tsr/wotc. i must admit that i've never heard of exodus... is that tsr/wotc?

and blackmoor is in the greyhawk setting. has been for about 30 years now. ^^ that'll save you one spot. and what about lankmahr? (if i can ever get the spelling right... )


i wound up voting for rokugan. (i knew there was a reason i forgot it!) it is a mishmash of stereotypes of oriental culture and ripped off of lo5r. it would help if they at least had some unique elements and a coherent storyline that isn't driven by what happened in a bunch of card games....

however, i will say that i found certain specific elements useful and interesting. a few grains of diamond among the dross.

Kilrex
04-01-2008, 05:40 PM
Well, because there are lots and lots of settings out there and a limited number of poll choices.

I added a poll on this thread based on settings mentioned already and a few extras that hadn't been brought up yet.

Thanks a heap!

Forgot all about Rokugan, but still I hate Eberon more.

Farcaster
04-01-2008, 06:20 PM
Although my personal choice was Eberron as to worst campaign setting, in fairness there are many on this list I have never played. Of the ones listed, I have tried: Dark Sun, Dragonlance, Eberron, Forgotten Realms, Greyhawk, Kingdoms of Kalamar (close second to Eberron for worst, IMHO), Planescape and Spelljammer.

RealmsDM
04-01-2008, 07:39 PM
Ooooh, here's a footnote that should be listed on this poll: 4th edition Forgotten Realms... looks like a bad re-write of a decent setting.

Farcaster
04-01-2008, 08:06 PM
4th edition Forgotten Realms... looks like a bad re-write of a decent setting.

But, that won't be out until August, so it'd be a big premature to judge it fully. Unless you have an advance copy ? If so, send it my way ;)

Kilrex
04-01-2008, 09:02 PM
Although my personal choice was Eberron as to worst campaign setting, in fairness there are many on this list I have never played. Of the ones listed, I have tried: Dark Sun, Dragonlance, Eberron, Forgotten Realms, Greyhawk, Kingdoms of Kalamar (close second to Eberron for worst, IMHO), Planescape and Spelljammer.

Currently playing in Eberon and Kalamar campaigns. I liked Birthright, Realms, and Dark Sun. Disliked Eberon, Dragonlance and Spelljammer. Was indifferent about Kalamar and Planecape. Owned the books for Rokugon and Greyhawk, but never used settings. Heard of Mystara and Ptolus. Never heard of Hollow World or Blackmoor or Exodus.

Grimwell
04-01-2008, 09:50 PM
...if anyone votes for Birthright I will have to hunt them down and kill them.

o.0

Oldgamer
04-02-2008, 07:30 AM
Draconian's can't taste like anything unless you keep them alive while you eat them like Dr. Lecter :D Otherwise they turn to stone, blow up, turn into YOU their killer, etc...Unless of course you are a draconian and kill them...then you could see what you taste like :)

Frobozz
04-02-2008, 07:54 AM
Draconian's can't taste like anything unless you keep them alive while you eat them like Dr. Lecter :D Otherwise they turn to stone, blow up, turn into YOU their killer, etc...Unless of course you are a draconian and kill them...then you could see what you taste like :)

Yea... that's why I placed my vote where I placed it. Lack of cuisine. :lol:

InfoStorm
04-02-2008, 08:21 AM
I chose Ebberon as the bottom. I played it and It's jut got TOO much magic. I always thought Mystara (D&D basic+ Gazetteers) was heavy on magic, and is my favorite setting thanks to the detail of the Gazetteers (Thank you Gygax), but Eberon made that seems like a low magic setting.

I personally don't like the complications brought on by the "living construct" creature type in Eberron or the DragonStar settings. Speaking of that, Call my a deranged sci-fi nut, but I even liked the DragonStar setting.

nijineko
04-02-2008, 03:21 PM
i would have brought up dragonstar, as i too liked a fair amount of the ideas involved... but i was under the impression that we were only voting on tsr/wotc settings.

blackmoor was the personal campaign setting of dave arneson, still ongoing after 30+ years in fact, that was combined with the city of greyhawk, the personal campaign setting of gary gygax, to create the official greyhawk setting.

blackmoor can be found on greyhawk maps far to the north, past the empire of iuz. it is quartered by the burneal forest on the west, the cold marshes on the south, the barren wastes on the east, and the land of black ice on the north. about 22-H, or 23-H on the maps.

fmitchell
04-02-2008, 03:58 PM
Actually I don't think I've ever played an "official D&D" setting, simply because I play so little D&D. I owned Planescape once, and recently downloaded a scan of Birthright, but I don't think I've seen any of the others in any detail.

However, I chose Forgotten Realms simply because, as I've gathered from other people, it has so much cruft: too many heroes, too much history, etc. The whole point of a setting is as a backdrop for the player characters; wandering around other people's stories is no fun. (I shy away from Star Wars, Babylon 5, etc. for the same reason, and if I ever play WoD for some reason I'll look for a game light on metaplot.)

Also, the planned reboot of FR reminds me too much of Crisis on Infinite Earths ...

Webhead
04-02-2008, 04:59 PM
However, I chose Forgotten Realms simply because, as I've gathered from other people, it has so much cruft: too many heroes, too much history, etc. The whole point of a setting is as a backdrop for the player characters; wandering around other people's stories is no fun. (I shy away from Star Wars, Babylon 5, etc. for the same reason, and if I ever play WoD for some reason I'll look for a game light on metaplot.)

I've dodged Forgotten Realms for much the same reason. Add on top of that the observed precedent that there's a +1 magic item under every rock and I grow disgusted really quick.

I've also been wary of playing in the Babylon 5 universe as well. I LOVED (I can't stress that enough) the series, but it felt very self-contained with little wiggle room without stepping on someone else's toes. And all WoD games I've run have been strictly and explicitly devoid of their metaplot. I made it basically my own "Earth-2 WoD" (to run with the Crisis reference :)).

Star Wars however, is a true exception from my experience. I love the setting (I loved it more before the prequels mucked it up) and have been playing/running the RPG since I first discovered it some 13 years ago. My games never touched the events of the films and never ever featured even cameos of any of the "main characters". I specifically did not want the players crossing paths with Luke/Han/Leia/etc. I wanted them to feel like they were creating their own chapter of the Star Wars saga. I was able to accomplish the independance of story as well as involve them in situations which were both heroic and meaningful. The Star Wars galaxy is so vast, there's so much unseen and unexplored in the movies that the PCs can just go wild looking for adventure. It's still probably the most open and compelling RPG setting in my mind...you just have to play it with the right people or things can go downhill very fast, but that's really true of any game.

Frobozz
04-02-2008, 05:20 PM
The only Star Wars campaign that survived any length of gaming sessions without crumbling to dust was my last one when I did a Knights of the Old Republic game.

That one change of timeframe solved all that is wrong with the Star Wars RPG concept. Now... EVERYONE could play a Jedi if they really wanted to. There wasn't any LucasArts characters around either so the whole "your characters are cool, but can never be as cool as Han/Luke/Chewie/Vader/R2D2/Quigon/Obiwan/etc..." with the exception of Yoda. And nobody argues or is depressed of the fact that Yoda schools them all. :D

You could have an unbelievably amazing ship as well and there wasn't the "well, that ship is nice, but it's still not as cool as the Falcon" mentality. Finally, there was more bunga to find! You had Sith ruins to infiltrate and explore, ancient Jedi relics laying around without Imperials snapping them up and running from the enemy meant that there were spots in the galaxy you could stop and rest. The enemy wasn't as far-reaching as the Empire.

RealmsDM
04-02-2008, 07:43 PM
But, that won't be out until August, so it'd be a big premature to judge it fully. Unless you have an advance copy ? If so, send it my way ;)

No, but I'm going by what I've read in "Grand History of the Realms"... yikes!!!
Also some 4e "rumors" (I haven't read these things for myself) but there will be no gnomes, no sorcerers, and this new "feywild" will be a bit, how shall I say, "an uber-powerful demiplane of shadow-esque, what were they thinking" joke.

Hutton
04-02-2008, 09:00 PM
Hollow World? Mystara? Blackmoor?
Are you kidding?

It suffered from Aaron Alston's clumsy reinterpretations, but this setting was classic.

tesral
04-02-2008, 09:27 PM
The only Star Wars campaign that survived any length of gaming sessions without crumbling to dust was my last one when I did a Knights of the Old Republic game.



It has been said you can GM anything in Star Wars. Any plot, any setting, any world, can be dropped into the Star Wars universe, it is simply that big and that flexible.

Webhead
04-02-2008, 11:54 PM
It has been said you can GM anything in Star Wars. Any plot, any setting, any world, can be dropped into the Star Wars universe, it is simply that big and that flexible.

That's mostly true for an ambitious or imaginitive GM.

You can run games set on primitive rim worlds or nearer the birth of the Republic which you can basically turn into a twisted sort of D&D.

You can run a more political game of deceit and intrigue if you like.

You can run a Shadowrun-like game of street-scum runners trying to bring down corporations on any of the many established (or homebrewed) "city worlds".

You could even string all three story archs together within the same campaign if that really tickled your fancy.

The Star Wars galaxy is just a huge sandbox for you to play in. I've been running Star Wars for many years and I've still got bunches of adventure ideas that I haven't gotten to use yet.

nijineko
04-03-2008, 07:02 AM
It has been said you can GM anything in Star Wars. Any plot, any setting, any world, can be dropped into the Star Wars universe, it is simply that big and that flexible.

i think you are mistaking star wars for amber. ;D amber could swallow the entire shadow-universe of star wars and not even notice. in fact, according to the in-game definition, it already has.

of course, amber is really best for playing characters who are absolutes. THE strongest, THE fastest, THE toughest, etc. when you scale it down, then other systems really do work better.

Oldgamer
04-03-2008, 08:10 AM
That's mostly true for an ambitious or imaginitive GM.

You can run games set on primitive rim worlds or nearer the birth of the Republic which you can basically turn into a twisted sort of D&D.

You can run a more political game of deceit and intrigue if you like.

You can run a Shadowrun-like game of street-scum runners trying to bring down corporations on any of the many established (or homebrewed) "city worlds".

You could even string all three story archs together within the same campaign if that really tickled your fancy.

The Star Wars galaxy is just a huge sandbox for you to play in. I've been running Star Wars for many years and I've still got bunches of adventure ideas that I haven't gotten to use yet.

We were in a seafaring game not too long ago, I was a 5th level Bronze Dragon Shaman, we also had a 5/Druid, and a 5/Assassin with us. We were basically island hopping following a treasure map, rescued some tribes from an evil temple...that kind of stuff, when we happened upon a cave with a glowing globe that looked like a giant diamond...and when we touched it, it popped and enveloped, effectively teleporting us to a strange situation. A holding cell on a ship from Star Wars... I don't like Sci Fi games, I like the movies well enough, but I'm D&D through and through. And the 3 of us were miserable while we were dragged through it for the next 2 sessions when the DM finally dropped it due to lack of interest and dropped us back into our seafaring D&D thankfully :)

Kilrex
04-03-2008, 09:53 AM
I am kinda shocked to see the Realms getting so many hits. I guess alot of people don't like the amount of story characters. I like the Realms because there is a little of everything in it and a wide variety of locations that are detailed. Of course having to get all the source books kinda sucks as they take up a whole bookself. And about 6 selves for the novels...

Or maybe, as posted earlier, Maztica is the cause of the poor showing?

Frobozz
04-03-2008, 10:35 AM
That's the problem. Too much information in the Realms. The perfect game world in my opinion is one that is defined enough that there's little question of its politics, economics, ecology, geography and religions... but open enough that you could fill the details of any of those with any canon you saw fit.

Tell me that there is Tyr, the god of Justice... don't tell me who the high priests are, where any of their temples are except perhaps the largest-most important one, or that the current ruler is a fanatical follower of Tyr and sacrifices a newborn son to him every 3 years... :) Let ME fill in that information. This way, I don't have players quoting canon to a GM who isn't using it or doesn't know about it (and doesn't want to).

nijineko
04-03-2008, 12:57 PM
glancing over at the best d&d setting thread, i note that fr and eb are getting the highest hits on both like and dislike.

boulet
04-03-2008, 12:59 PM
Tell me that there is Tyr, the god of Justice... don't tell me who the high priests are, where any of their temples are except perhaps the largest-most important one, or that the current ruler is a fanatical follower of Tyr and sacrifices a newborn son to him every 3 years... :) Let ME fill in that information.

Yeah, that's a general issue with settings players know too well. That's why I'm rarely excited by mainstream settings like Middle Earth or Star Wars : the settings lawyer type of player who's going to object that "such equipment doesn't exist on..." Tattoine/Riverdale/whatever canon town of the setting.

Webhead
04-03-2008, 01:48 PM
We were in a seafaring game not too long ago, I was a 5th level Bronze Dragon Shaman, we also had a 5/Druid, and a 5/Assassin with us. We were basically island hopping following a treasure map, rescued some tribes from an evil temple...that kind of stuff, when we happened upon a cave with a glowing globe that looked like a giant diamond...and when we touched it, it popped and enveloped, effectively teleporting us to a strange situation. A holding cell on a ship from Star Wars... I don't like Sci Fi games, I like the movies well enough, but I'm D&D through and through. And the 3 of us were miserable while we were dragged through it for the next 2 sessions when the DM finally dropped it due to lack of interest and dropped us back into our seafaring D&D thankfully :)


How funny! I had the exact opposite situation happen in my group years ago! We were playing in a Star Wars campaign (with occasionally rotating GM duty) and the GM basically had us teleported to a D&D-type world and trapped us there. It was around the second session that he wanted to turn the Jedi into Wizards and had us rolling for Hit Points that we bowed out of the game. It was one of the worst games ever. I don't want any D&D mucking up my Star Wars, thank you very much! :p


Yeah, that's a general issue with settings players know too well. That's why I'm rarely excited by mainstream settings like Middle Earth or Star Wars : the settings lawyer type of player who's going to object that "such equipment doesn't exist on..." Tattoine/Riverdale/whatever canon town of the setting.

I agree in having distaste for this particular problem, but I've never had it rear its head in Star Wars. Maybe I'm just lucky that my players were too excited about playing the game to try to pull that kind of crap on me (or maybe they knew better). Star Wars is (generally) the first game I get asked to run when it comes time for a new campaign. But then too, Star Wars (when played right) is less about the "stuff" than it is about the heroics.

Oldgamer
04-04-2008, 08:55 AM
Frome every FR hater I've heard from, here , on Wizard's boards, and other local boards, the biggest reason they don't like FR is there is too much and everything has been done, now what? I personally like the Realms, but I have not delved very deep into them, I actually have only played it a few times, mostly at very high level.

Farcaster
04-04-2008, 11:28 AM
I would be daunted too if I was trying to run a strictly canon game. It would be easy to choke on the details. Instead, I make Forgotten Realms my own. I may or may not go by what has been set down in the material, and I change whatever I want to suit my game and my story. But, at the same time there is a world of rich history for me to draw on.

tesral
04-04-2008, 12:10 PM
I would be daunted too if I was trying to run a strictly canon game. It would be easy to choke on the details. Instead, I make Forgotten Realms my own. I may or may not go by what has been set down in the material, and I change whatever I want to suit my game and my story. But, at the same time there is a world of rich history for me to draw on.


And any discrepancy is obviously the chronicler wasn't being truthful (canon books)

I am of the opinion that it's the only way to really run a pre-made setting. You have to own it. Say that any book before X date I'll take, but anything after that has to apply to be part of my world.

Webhead
04-04-2008, 02:53 PM
I would be daunted too if I was trying to run a strictly canon game. It would be easy to choke on the details. Instead, I make Forgotten Realms my own. I may or may not go by what has been set down in the material, and I change whatever I want to suit my game and my story. But, at the same time there is a world of rich history for me to draw on.

I agree. One of the niceties of having a pre-established game world to draw upon is that there may be a plethora of ideas that you really like from it that can be used to inspire your own, original adventures. I don't really do it with D&D as I tend to create my D&D worlds from whole cloth, but for certain other RPGs, I often will make my world a sort of patchwork quilt. There are elements of the pre-established world that I cut out and stick here and there to fill out ideas for adventures, but it's rarely the same shape as the world "as presented in book X".

I take ownership of my game worlds and create my own Frankenstein Monster out of them. I take what I like, drop what I don't and stir it all up.

In my opinion, pre-established worlds work best as a springboard for your own creation. One that can harken to the "theme" or "mood" of the published world, but which follows its own bold, new directions.

nijineko
04-04-2008, 08:14 PM
my favorite way of running greyhawk, is to start somewhere between the twin cataclysms and 'known history' and go from there. that way the players have a chance to become the major movers of the game, instead of gygaxs and arnesons' group's pcs. ^^

Engar
06-17-2008, 11:07 AM
I could not pick half of them becauseI do not know. We always (except Darksun) played homebrew worlds (Forgotten Realms used to be the "catch all smorgasborg" so we always said our games were "part of Fortgotten Realms" even after they expanded into full world maps without the rest of the "forgotten" realms. For that reason alone I must not choose it. That I like Waterdeep even if I never actually played there or any published FR setting (no one ever even tried to go there or anywhere else in the "realms" from our games so we never thougth much on it). Guess that's kind of silly, especially since I who made so much of it all never thought 'til now about how my game is really not FR and never was. Heh, I like that I can still be as naive as new gamer, keeps me modest lol!

Tas, as a kender, was great as a character in a novel. Not so good as a character in a game, but hey, to each his own (unless you like 'em, then it's to each everyone else's).

Birthright bombed when we tried it, but I could see having legs elsewhere, just needed real work.

What is Blackmoor?

Where is Ravenloft? Not that I would choose it, it just deserves mention.

Greyhawk: funny, I still remember nothing about it yet idolize it from afar (and I have the Adv book). Like an antique toy your parents forbid you to touch as a kid. I look at it and see something that could be really fun, but then again I am afraid it might be too old and valuable and what if I broke it?

Dark Sun: love it, still not sure I could run it, but to play again a DM who can...

Eberron: I know it like someone who only watched The Next Generation might know Deep Space Nine. Eh, not my cup of tea, but I see the logic and appreciate the thought (all those golems and magic users could end up there).

Hollow World: Seen it. As a matter of fact I have seen this many, many times in many, many ways (sci-fi movies, fantasy movies, The Time Machine, Middle Earth!). Never got past the "old hat" impression to consider it. Still I have no reason to say it is "bad".

Kalamar: I think this was 3rd party and looked alright.

Mystara: I remember nothing good about it, but still I know almost nothing about it besides the grumblings of others. High magic or something? Or am I mixing it up with another one? It started in 2e, right?

Planescape: for the video game alone I would not choose this, plus it was like grunge (or the beatnick culture that preceeded it) meets DnD. The factors, the weird looking whatchamacallits, whole new lexicon (berks!), Devils and Solars hanging out in the same bar, dirty streets, and a strange woman no one ever saw or knew anything about except not to mock her for there is a very real and very quick cost to baiting that'un. Plus it fit into any game anytime and could be just as quickly and easily yanked back and never seen again.

Plotus: no idea, saw a post suggests to me it is like a city game (Waterdeep-ish? Sigil-ish?)

Rokugan: again, no idea, this time not even an inkling.

I know there was an asian-samurai themed setting once too. (Something East I think). Too obscure perhaps?

Then we come to Spelljammer. I have all kinds of crap about spelljammer. I also think much of it is just that, crap. Don't get me wrong, some of it is very interesting and very creative. It is also mostly like free writing and certainly not like a thought out and well developed product. Some of it is, most of it isn't. And the editor, gatekeeper, overboss, whatever they call it, should be transformed back into a Lemure. Who the heck allows GIANT SPACE HAMSTERS to get by them in a published work? I think they wrongly addressed to the printer an entire setting idea that was meant for the first April issue of Dragon. But hey, back then I bought the stuff, even after getting the boxed set. I had to have ALL monster sheets known to man.

Spelljammer is my pick.

cplmac
06-17-2008, 11:23 AM
Hollow World, because I couldn't see the need to make differences between stuff on the outside surface and the stuff that was basically just inside a big cave/cavern.

tesral
06-17-2008, 05:36 PM
What is Blackmoor?

Dave Arnson's game world created for D&D pre-release edition. One of the world where the whole idea happened. Greyhawk is supposedly on the same world but well after the "Blackmoor" setting.

It was put out as a sort of stand alone thing The First Fantasy Campaign.

agoraderek
06-17-2008, 09:46 PM
good old blackmoor. temple of the frog! yay!

oh, and dragonlance as worst setting. one word: kender. 'nuff said.

i voted spelljammer though. giff may be worse than kender, havent decided yet...

Arch Lich Thoth-Amon
06-18-2008, 12:36 AM
I havent played all that was listed but for the ones i did play, i didnt care for Eberron. To me, it was designed for the 10-14 age group.

Oldgamer
06-18-2008, 10:16 AM
Greyhawk: funny, I still remember nothing about it yet idolize it from afar (and I have the Adv book). Like an antique toy your parents forbid you to touch as a kid. I look at it and see something that could be really fun, but then again I am afraid it might be too old and valuable and what if I broke it?


:eek: Ouch! LOL, When I started playing D&D in the early 80's, Dragonlance and Greyhawk were my first two and both are still my favorite...you maka me feel old, :lol:

Aidan
06-18-2008, 03:15 PM
I've never played in anything but a homebrewed campaign setting. When I first started playing, we had the Greyhawk and Blackmoor books, but only used them because that's where Paladins and Rangers first appeared. So, I'd have to say my favorite setting is homebrewed. I don't like being restricted to someone else's creation as a GM.

PS: I agree, all kender should be killed in the most painful way possible on sight.

ElrikDarkstorm
06-19-2008, 04:09 PM
i would have to say that one of the worst ones was that one(i forgot the name)that was set in an arabian type setting al qualdim or something like that or i can go with spelljammer and maybe gamma world even though i have never played it and the art work was fantastic it seemed a bit out of place and birthright wasnt as cool as i thought it would be,

Arch Lich Thoth-Amon
06-19-2008, 04:46 PM
You got me confused. Is it Gamma Worlds setting or rules that you hate?

Thoth-Amon

Oldgamer
06-20-2008, 07:45 AM
i would have to say that one of the worst ones was that one(i forgot the name)that was set in an arabian type setting al qualdim or something like that or i can go with spelljammer and maybe gamma world even though i have never played it and the art work was fantastic it seemed a bit out of place and birthright wasnt as cool as i thought it would be,


I think the Al Quadim setting you're talking about is actually an offshoot Forgotten Realms. I had a boxed set in the late 80's that was Forgotten Realms Al Quadim that was an Arabian type setting. I didn't like it that well either, I think that's what steered me away from FR for so many years, I thought all FR was like that until I delved into the Demonweb pits :)