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Maelstrom
02-12-2008, 03:59 PM
I've been running a few "sessions" of D&D for my 4 year old son, and wondered if people had any ideas.

He likes the miniatures, and enjoys his "Big Axe" and how he gets to roll a 8 sided dice instead of a six sided dice. I made him a barebones character sheet with hit points and a list of equipment: Armor, Big Axe, Big Sword, Bow, Zapper (wand). He understand hit points and cleric healing now, rouge's abilities to open doors and find traps. He knows what to do when he sees an orc or a goblin (whack em until they fall down).

I just lay out a few dungeon tiles, pick out a few minis, and have him fight bad guys with a cleric and a rouge NPC helping out. This morning, I pulled out a particularly nasty looking monster, so he got scared and had his guy run out of the dungeon until I convinced him that if he didn't help his Cleric and Rouge friends might be in trouble.

Any ideas on what I should focus on next? He's got limited attention span, but he certainly looks forward to our sessions.

Mulsiphix
02-12-2008, 04:04 PM
I think if you can keep things combat heavy, say 90% of the time, you should be able to keep his attention. The more emphasis on strength, power, super items, etc... the more I think he would enjoy it. What little boy doesn't enjoy feeling powerful?

Maelstrom
02-12-2008, 04:06 PM
Heh, more than 3 dice rolls at a time and he spaces out. I gotta keep it at 1st level fights where you hit a monster they fall down, or he starts picking up dungeon tiles and using them as a hat.

Mulsiphix
02-12-2008, 04:51 PM
Maybe you could add a supers twist to it? Kinda hard to generalize without knowing your son first hand. Mine are the high energy, low attention span, destroy everything kind of kids. If they're still this way when they hit four I think a supers campaign would be right up their ally.

Anaesthesia
02-12-2008, 06:02 PM
Hmm...the last time I DM'd for a kid, he about 10 or so. He was a bard with levels in commoner. I had him and 2 NPCs prank the local witch so she'd leave the area. Then they all won an award when she ran away. One thing I did was to have "grown-ups" the characters can go run to and receive help from.

I am not sure if you are doing any specific "storyline" with him, other than monster encounters. The one thing I keep coming to is maybe try a simple mission for him (such as get a particular kind of leaf or talk to the local wizard about borrowing a specific book on Dragons or have a friendly local Dragon let him peruse his hoarde-after the gets a good story/joke of course, etc).

spotlight
02-12-2008, 06:16 PM
Having had three of my own, as well as, hmmm ... lets see .... OH! Eight grand littles. Gaming must be kept simple for these.
For my eldest three gds, I played 'pretend' with them, useing lego people, while watching cartoons, showing them how to make their own super heros.
Dice rolling was out when they were younger. I just gave them a stack of dominoes and told them that it cost one dominoe to do super things. Yes,attention was short, but it made the commercials go by quick.

Riftwalker
02-12-2008, 09:11 PM
This is so cute! :)

tesral
02-12-2008, 09:24 PM
KISS. I think the fact he wants to play at all is a plus. Keep is simple, keep the goals uncomplicated.

Mulsiphix
02-12-2008, 09:35 PM
Definitely some good ideas here. I wonder if this is a niche somebody will capitalize on like those videos for dogs/cats.

tesral
02-12-2008, 09:43 PM
Definitely some good ideas here. I wonder if this is a niche somebody will capitalize on like those videos for dogs/cats.

So we need a line of larger scale, sturdier minis with simplified stats that can be understood without reading? I'm thinking DDM run through the Fisher Price filter.

Maelstrom
02-12-2008, 09:45 PM
Hah! Good idea. Have a "Player's Handbook Just for Kids!" The naysayers of the world would love that...

I for one would buy it.

Mulsiphix
02-12-2008, 09:46 PM
As would I :D

tesral
02-12-2008, 09:48 PM
Hah! Good idea. Have a "Player's Handbook Just for Kids!" The naysayers of the world would love that...

I for one would buy it.

Might buy it FOR someone. My Son is 28 and has more minis than I do.

"Mrs. Grundy" needs her dress pulled over her head and herself dumped in the mud as frequently as possible. Naysayers be damned.

rabkala
02-12-2008, 10:03 PM
"Mrs. Grundy" needs her dress pulled over her head and herself dumped in the mud as frequently as possible.

Your wife wouldn't like you talking about her again! :confused:

I don't know if I would really try gaming until they hit puberty.

tesral
02-12-2008, 10:05 PM
Your wife wouldn't like you talking about her again! :confused:

I don't know if I would really try gaming until they hit puberty.

I'm not married to the biddy.

Mulsiphix
02-12-2008, 10:11 PM
I don't know if I would really try gaming until they hit puberty.At such a young age this is more for the parents than the child. An enjoyable way to connect with your child is a blessing for both of you indeed. As far as real enjoyment of the game itself, I wouldn't think that would be possible until around 7 or 8 for the over mature or above average intelligence child. For most I think 10 or 11 would be more realistic.

cplmac
02-12-2008, 10:31 PM
At such a young age this is more for the parents than the child. An enjoyable way to connect with your child is a blessing for both of you indeed. As far as real enjoyment of the game itself, I wouldn't think that would be possible until around 7 or 8 for the over mature or above average intelligence child. For most I think 10 or 11 would be more realistic.


I would have to say that I totally agree with you.

Maelstrom
02-13-2008, 09:09 AM
I disagree. Certainly, he can't grasp the main concepts of the game or peruse the rulebooks, but those will come with time. The key thing is that he is enjoying it... I'm not trying to make him do it. It started when he saw me setting up for a D&D session and wanted to play too.

Yes, there is the fact that there is a quality time element. Perhaps just as good as reading a book... it invites imagination and a desire to learn, and teaches in an objectified way how there are consequences for your actions.

Not to say this is a replacement for good parenting or that D&D is the end all be all of learning tools, but it can help.

Mulsiphix
02-13-2008, 11:33 AM
I disagree.

I'm not trying to make him do it. It started when he saw me setting up for a D&D session and wanted to play too.

Yes, there is the fact that there is a quality time element. Perhaps just as good as reading a book... it invites imagination and a desire to learn, and teaches in an objectified way how there are consequences for your actions.

Not to say this is a replacement for good parenting or that D&D is the end all be all of learning tools, but it can help.Any enjoyable time, especially one with educational value, with your child is "quality time" as far as I am concerned ;)

tesral
02-13-2008, 02:32 PM
Any enjoyable time, especially one with educational value, with your child is "quality time" as far as I am concerned ;)

I hate that term "quality time" as if time with your child isn't important unless it meets certain criteria and certain things are accomplished. It's like parenting is a list of things to do and you need to check them off to be a good parent.

Meh. Keep them long on hugs and short on pocket change. Be consistent and fair. That is about all the advice I think really matters. People have done a good job of parenting for over 100,000 years without the experts who talk like they invented it.

Keep playing with him as long has he shows an interest in the game.

Mulsiphix
02-13-2008, 02:39 PM
Do you have any kids tesral? I often feel like I want to choke the life out of them. Nothing quite distorts the human psyche like a child trying to get on your nerves. They do it for fun. They're sick like that :eek:. Time I enjoy with them, when everything seems to fall into place and I'm truly enjoying their company is quality time. There are many times when I interact with them out of a feeling of obligation. They love me so much and they don't quite understand the concept of work or financial obligations yet. Often I have other things on my mind but want to make sure they get to spend some time with me. When such weight is not on my shoulders, when I find myself enjoying their company without the urge to strangle them or the worries of life, I consider such time to be quality time. For the busy parent, quality time is often better planned than spontaneous. Spontaneous fun can happen but it just doesn't happen that often for me.

tesral
02-13-2008, 02:54 PM
Do you have any kids tesral? I often feel like I want to choke the life out of them. Nothing quite distorts the human psyche like a child trying to get on your nerves.
<snippage happens>
I consider such time to be quality time. For the busy parent, quality time is often better planned than spontaneous. Spontaneous fun can happen but it just doesn't happen that often for me.

I have one son, well past the toddler stage. I agree with my Mother in that what amazes her is not that child abuse happens, but that it happens so little. Yes, insanity is hereditary, you get it from your kids. People use to ask me how many kids I had. I said "A house full, all one of him." Matthew was the drama King. If anything could be blown up into the biggest event the universe had EVAR known, he would do it. Unique in that? Doubtful. But he was the one I dealt with. Distance from the event lends perspective you just cannot get at the time.

I still despise the term "quality time" used as a club to beat parents with. Usually by single people who have no clue but do have a dead sheep from college on their wall, and think they know everything.

boulet
02-13-2008, 02:59 PM
Tesral ! I love your post about "quality time" and self proclaimed "experts" ! It's like you wrote sth I've been thinking for a long time and never put into words.

It's not just about education, but about food, sex, political correctness, religion etc... It's like because some people lack common sense and mess up their life, suddenly everybody should abide dumb rules that Dr Phil and other media gurus throw at us in a lame 3 minutes tv show (i.e. blah blah quality time). Next thing you know, one of your kid starts having a fit at a mall, you raise your voice in order to curve the behaviour and suddenly stranger eyes stare at you like you were abusing the kid. F*** that ! Maybe these strangers tolerate their own kids to be uberbrats in public, but I haven't been educated that way, and I'm entitled to choose the educational model I estimate the better.

To hell with mass media experts who answer to people real problems with a 3 minutes inept platitude.

Drohem
02-13-2008, 03:06 PM
On one hand, I completely agree with tersal and boulet about media telling us how to raise our kids, ;) and then, on the other hand, there are a lot of just plain dumb people that have no clue or innate sense of parenting that need to led by the nose on some techniques. :(

Mulsiphix
02-13-2008, 07:24 PM
I guess when I think of "quality time" I don't immediately think of the media, Dr. Phil, and/or people trying to tell me how to raise my child. Every child and situation is different. Ever opinion, household, upbringing, view of the world, view of right and wrong, etc... are different. To each their own. What I find more disturbing than people who feel the need to tell others how to parent, are the masses of parents who buy their books, tapes, courses, and attend their seminars. It is just revolting :(

tesral
02-13-2008, 08:53 PM
Without getting too far off the subject of D&D for toddlers, I will point out that the stupid exceptions to common sense make the news because they are rare.

In general most people are competent. If it wasn't the case our roads would be graveyards and the cities would be burning. The myth of the incompetent other used to drum up fear, promote laws to address that fear and gain power for politicians is just that a myth. The exceptions used to make the case for rules are just that, exceptions.

Witch hunts seem to find witches for the simple rule that if all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail. One generally learns years later that the crime was those lives ruined by the witch hunters. Don't believe it can happen today? Anyone remember the satanist cult scare that was supposedly molesting children in the 70s and 80s? The result is that it was just that, a scare. Those people accused have been cleared, but their lives have been ruined and stained. No child was ever found that could reliably be proven to have been abused. However people went to jail over "recovered memories". the abuse was manufactured wholesale by quack therapists.

I take witch hunts seriously, including those against my favorite hobby. They can and do hurt people. Never remain silent. Silence implies consent.

And yes I am way off topic here.

Mulsiphix
02-13-2008, 10:22 PM
Off topic but I agree with what your saying ;)

nijineko
02-14-2008, 01:28 AM
time and attention is what kids want and need. it doesn't take much, in most cases. and the payback years later is more than worth the small efforts now.

mine likes to knock things over. perhaps some small towers of legos or blocks would be a popular addition to your game. ^^

Maelstrom
02-14-2008, 08:55 AM
Heh, we do plenty of that outside D&D sessions.

After we finish a D&D session my son likes to get together all of the "Bad Guys" (see the pic for my horrific monsters in the Wargaming section (http://www.penandpapergames.com/forums/showthread.php?t=5147)). He puts them together on top of the Tower dungeon tile, and they have some kind of party where they murmer to each other in mean sounding voices. Don't know what they're up to, but its entertaining to watch him play.

Mulsiphix
02-14-2008, 10:48 AM
I'm stingy with my mini's and other expensive gaming things. Until they're old enough to understand they are nearly as important as the children themselves, no mini's for them! (slightly kidding)

tesral
02-14-2008, 12:19 PM
I'm stingy with my mini's and other expensive gaming things. Until they're old enough to understand they are nearly as important as the children themselves, no mini's for them! (slightly kidding)

Pewter yes, D&D minis, let them play the things are tough.

Maelstrom
02-14-2008, 12:54 PM
Lead? Mmmm

Yeah, I have all D&D minis. No danger there.

Farcaster
02-14-2008, 01:27 PM
Yeah, I have all D&D minis. No danger there.

Choking hazard though, right?

Maelstrom
02-14-2008, 01:53 PM
Yeah, there's a choking hazard, from me if he decides to try to chew on the minis! :)

tesral
02-14-2008, 02:02 PM
Yeah, there's a choking hazard, from me if he decides to try to chew on the minis! :)

SNERK!!! :D

Mulsiphix
02-14-2008, 02:35 PM
My kids put everything in their mouths. It is seriously disturbing. I could leave a pack of razorblades out and they would have them in their mouths within seconds. Seriously scary sometimes :o

Drohem
02-14-2008, 03:07 PM
I would say the majority of kids are like that. ;)

Maelstrom
02-14-2008, 03:21 PM
All right, so heres a suggested product line:

Newborns through 12 months: D&D mobiles with pretty lights showing firebreathing dragons and a wizards lightning bolt. A D&D teething ring made to look like a minotaur's nose ring.

1-3: A version of D&D minis that is what Duplo is to Lego.

2-4: They graduate to the "You're first Role Playing Game" books that have friendly bards and barbarians talk about what they do, complete with a fuzzy picture of the Wizard's cat familiar.

Drohem
02-14-2008, 03:27 PM
I think that a good introduction when they're reading level is fairly good would be the chose-your-path RPG type books. It introduces them to some of the basic concepts of table-top RPGs like hit points, armor class, attributes, etc.

tesral
02-14-2008, 05:59 PM
All right, so heres a suggested product line:

Newborns through 12 months: D&D mobiles with pretty lights showing firebreathing dragons and a wizards lightning bolt. A D&D teething ring made to look like a minotaur's nose ring.

1-3: A version of D&D minis that is what Duplo is to Lego.

2-4: They graduate to the "You're first Role Playing Game" books that have friendly bards and barbarians talk about what they do, complete with a fuzzy picture of the Wizard's cat familiar.


I like it. I can hear the moral maifia screaming already.

cplmac
02-14-2008, 08:19 PM
All right, so heres a suggested product line:

Newborns through 12 months: D&D mobiles with pretty lights showing firebreathing dragons and a wizards lightning bolt. A D&D teething ring made to look like a minotaur's nose ring.

1-3: A version of D&D minis that is what Duplo is to Lego.

2-4: They graduate to the "You're first Role Playing Game" books that have friendly bards and barbarians talk about what they do, complete with a fuzzy picture of the Wizard's cat familiar.


Outstanding! Just to bad my 2 girls will be past them by the time they would make iit to market. I especially like the idea of a Duplo type line to help prevent the choking hazard.

Maelstrom
02-14-2008, 09:29 PM
I think that a good introduction when they're reading level is fairly good would be the chose-your-path RPG type books. It introduces them to some of the basic concepts of table-top RPGs like hit points, armor class, attributes, etc.

True true... if I had to put a nail in what got me headed in the direction of D&D, those books would be it. Loved the Lone Hawk series.

boulet
02-14-2008, 10:06 PM
oh my god I didn't think about those books in years ! They saved me from boredom so many times. Great concept.

Maelstrom
02-15-2008, 05:07 AM
Dang it, it was actually Lone Wolf, not Lone Hawk. It's been too long. I would record all of my choices in order, so that I could "Go back in time" and make new choices, just to see all the possible conclusions.

And those random charts where you aren't supposed to look, then you stick your pencil on a grid of numbers? Classic. I had to eventually get a d10 since the temptation to cheat a little was too high.

Drohem
02-15-2008, 03:46 PM
hehe...yeah, I used go back and do everything to see the outcomes of different choices as well.

Mulsiphix
02-15-2008, 04:02 PM
I've actually choked on a Duplo figurine before. No joke. Anybody here ever considered just letting your kids play with D&D action figures? Playing non-paper based fantasy themed "imaginary" games with them? I think they would respond better and learn more from that type of interaction than from sitting down at the table.

Maelstrom
02-15-2008, 04:13 PM
Wouldn't be a bad start. Is there an official line of action figures?

Drohem
02-15-2008, 04:15 PM
Well, if they have some cool female characters, then I would definitely consider buying those over Barbie.

Mulsiphix
02-15-2008, 10:45 PM
Wouldn't be a bad start. Is there an official line of action figures?Currently? Doubtful. We're in the age of digital goodies, clix, and plastic mini's :(

the_tigerlily
02-15-2008, 11:53 PM
Does anyone else remember Hero Quest? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HeroQuest_(board_game (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HeroQuest_%28board_game))
I started playing it with my older brother when I was six and he was nine. I loved it, even though my brother always made me be the monsters. I would think it might be more your son's speed. There are some small pieces, and I remember it as complicated, but then I haven't played in 14 years so... I'm not sure it even exists anymore.

rabkala
02-16-2008, 02:09 AM
Dragonstrike took over for heroquest I think. Then that too died.

tesral
02-16-2008, 05:14 AM
Take anything at the speed the child is willing to take it, if they show an interest. I didn't twist my son's arm to game, he asked me if he could play. We got come of his frineds together and I DMed for them. They were about twelve. We played a lighter hearted game than I usually run. He did it for a few weeks and walked a way for a year or two, but came back to it seriously in high school.

Yea I went hammer and tongs with my Mother. I frankly told her I saw nothing wrong with my hobby and that if Matthew had an inerest in the game, I would let him play.

She did have more than an average influence because of the death of my first wife. I'm glad she stepped up to help me, but we don't see eye to eye on everything.

rabkala
02-16-2008, 10:49 AM
Well, if they have some cool female characters, then I would definitely consider buying those over Barbie.
So, how many Barbie dolls do you buy yourself regularly? :p

boulet
02-16-2008, 12:01 PM
/me raises the otaku level of the thread to "creepy"

Drohem
02-16-2008, 01:57 PM
So, how many Barbie dolls do you buy yourself regularly? :p


Silly, silly Mulishix....I have two daughters. :p

tesral
02-16-2008, 09:13 PM
I was looking for Star Trek toys yesterday and ran across the Barbie and Ken Star Trek dolls. That's creepy.

boulet
02-16-2008, 09:16 PM
Especially if Ken digs Picard's haircut

tesral
02-16-2008, 09:22 PM
Well that's another notch. :p

cplmac
02-16-2008, 09:26 PM
Silly, silly Mulishix....I have two daughters. :p


Same here. The oldest though lines all her dolls up on the couch and "puts them to sleep". I'm sure she wouldn't mind a few more.

Drohem
02-17-2008, 11:53 AM
Well, if they have a Deana Troy or Number 7 dolls, I wouldn't mind some Star Trek dolls, LOL!

Mulsiphix
02-18-2008, 05:36 AM
Silly, silly Mulishix....I have two daughters. :pWas this addressed to me? You quoted rabkala.

I actually buy my three year old son several "girl" items. Purse, shoes, jewelry, etc... I never understood how a toy or accessory could affect a child's sexuality as an adult :confused:

boulet
02-18-2008, 09:06 AM
It's because female hormones are contagious, just like atheism, homosexuality and drug addictions...

It makes me think or Tesral's mother and her irrational hatred of RPG, no justification here, probably just a few articles about gamers allegedly gone postal after a D&D session. My oh my I'm going to explode about media again... Time to brew some coffee :P

Drohem
02-18-2008, 12:56 PM
Was this addressed to me? You quoted rabkala.

I actually buy my three year old son several "girl" items. Purse, shoes, jewelry, etc... I never understood how a toy or accessory could affect a child's sexuality as an adult :confused:

/homervoiceon
Doh!!!
/homervoiceoff

hehehe....I naturally assumed such a comment would've come from you, LOL! Sorry. :o

rabkala, you tricky devil, you!

Chris House
02-18-2008, 01:19 PM
when My kids where young I design a character sheet with pictures -
I used fuzzies as characters, animal people
the stats where done with a few pictures and dots
the game they named Fuzzy world !
let see i just saw one sheet the other days

heart = health
Running stick figure =for movement
fist = fighting
eye = looking
and arm making a muscle = strength and size
wand = magic
with dots 1-5
this was added to a dice roll high number won

equipment was drawn with dots for amount or power
shield for armor
sword for weapons
book for magic leasons
potion bottle for potions
more dotes the more time they could use it, they got stuff from beating monsters
the plots where simple

#find lost baby dargon for the mommy dragon or she eats the town
#stop goblins from steeling farmer Mcdonals pumpkins
tanner was 6 and caellan was 4, it worked as long as I kept it to 30 mins
son is ADD and daughter was a little brain !

their characters was where not in proportion this did not matter to them.
a wolf warrior
a mouse adventure
a bear wizard
cat Burglar

I did it all in paint and hand drew the pictures - I gave them a game
just before we adults had ours, and they where put to bed.

magic was simple spells
zapp it
grab it
hold it
jump it
put it to sleep

this taught them to count real quick and to trouble shoot in a very fundamentals fashion.

I made them there own book so to speak with picture
and dots , I made a basic doria like map of town and woods and Inside castle and under the castle was a dungeon where the dragon lived
it was done lets see ten years ago.
now the twins are four both are ADHD so i am thinking when they are six i well teach them this game.
right now its stuff animals and big plushy dice:rolleyes:

Maelstrom
02-18-2008, 01:25 PM
Very nice system there. I like it.

Malruhn
02-18-2008, 02:25 PM
I was running a small scenario for my middle daughter last week (she's 12), and my six-year-old wanted to listen in. As I described the old watch tower to the 12-y-o, my youngest asks, "Why is it so broken down?"

"Well, because there isn't anyone to take care of it."
"Why not?"
"Because everyone in the country ran away or died."
"Boy, it's a good thing that isn't real!!"
"But it IS! There are lots of ruins out there from the Greeks and Romans."
"Like what, Daddy?"

I jumped up and got my barely-reading daughter a stupid picture book I've used for sketchy research and she was happy for about an hour, looking at the pics and sounding out the words.

Then she hit me with it...

"Daddy, when will I be old enough to play that game?"

*sniff* I got another one hooked!

Mulsiphix
02-18-2008, 05:16 PM
/homervoiceon
Doh!!!
/homervoiceoff

hehehe....I naturally assumed such a comment would've come from you, LOL! Sorry. :oTisk Tisk Drohem :p

Maelstrom
02-18-2008, 05:35 PM
"Daddy, when will I be old enough to play that game?"

*sniff* I got another one hooked!

Ahh yes. It's great to see our children all grown up and playing RPGs :)

tesral
02-18-2008, 09:05 PM
this taught them to count real quick and to trouble shoot in a very fundamentals fashion.


Dude you have a neat toddler D&D system in one page. That is sweet. That is D&D run thorugh the Fisher Price filter.

nijineko
02-19-2008, 07:39 AM
pitch it to hasbro, for the next big cash cow. ;D only you'll be sitting on it, and you'll hopefully remember all of your friends here. oh, and we all volunteer our kids (and selves) as beta-testers. ^^

Maelstrom
02-19-2008, 08:32 AM
Would definitely like to see those rules fleshed out, Chris. If you happen to have some of the images you generated, even better.

nijineko
02-19-2008, 08:51 AM
take some pics of the layouts for your kids photoalbums, and for posting here on the boards! ;D

cplmac
02-19-2008, 07:46 PM
pitch it to hasbro, for the next big cash cow. ;D only you'll be sitting on it, and you'll hopefully remember all of your friends here. oh, and we all volunteer our kids (and selves) as beta-testers. ^^


Be sure to copy rite it first, then pitch it to the toy companies. Make them go up against each other for the best deal you can get. Work it right and you will have all of your kids college taken care of.

the_tigerlily
02-20-2008, 05:38 AM
Be sure to copy rite it first, then pitch it to the toy companies. Make them go up against each other for the best deal you can get. Work it right and you will have all of your kids college taken care of.

Or even (after copyrighting) make up kits and sell them on the internet (if that would be feasible.) I for one would buy a kit for my (or my brother's) future children.

Maelstrom
02-20-2008, 08:32 AM
RPGNow (http://www.rpgnow.com) is a good source for Indie titles. I game with one of the publishers that puts stuff up there.

Mulsiphix
02-20-2008, 09:04 AM
I found something that might actually catch a small childs attention. FUDGE: Another Fine Mess (http://www.warehouse23.com/item.html?id=GGG2001). Sounds adorable :p

Maelstrom
02-20-2008, 10:44 AM
Eek, the Kids might enjoy it, but I think it'd drive me nuts!

cplmac
02-20-2008, 11:50 AM
Sounds good, but it might be a little invovled for those under say five years old. At least the price includes everything you need to run the game, provided you have the dice already. Nice that it is not too pricey, either.

Mulsiphix
02-20-2008, 05:17 PM
FUDGE can easily be ran with 3D6 or taking four standard dice and coloring four sides a total of two colors. I think this adventure would catch the kiddies attention around five to six years old, compared to D&D's 10 to 12 (generally speaking of course).

Chris House
02-21-2008, 11:00 AM
WELL I never really thought there wouold be a market for little kids rpg thingy , and thought my kids where just wanting to play like mommy and daddy!

but yea I can make twenty five page book with illustrations, and a map or board. I now am teaching my twin five year olds and use the figures from DnD minitures.

Maelstrom
02-21-2008, 12:25 PM
I can talk to my publisher friend about what it'd take to make an indie if you're interested. He's got artists and such on staff, realeases downloadable pdf books.

I know I for one would buy for the right price!

DrAwkward
02-21-2008, 05:43 PM
If you do decide to persue getting it published, I'd love to meddle.

Foe example,
How about each score is either a 4, 6, 8, 10, or 12.
to make a check you roll a die with that many sides.

There is less math (its not roll + dots) but it would let them play around with rolling different size dice (which is fun)

"Ok, Punkin, your score is four. Do you know which die to roll?
The one that makes Daddy cuss when he steps on it?
Thats right! and how many letters in the words Daddy uses?
Four!
I get to roll the one that we use for Monopoly.
Six!
Right. Hope you roll better than me - it's gonna be tough."

cplmac
02-21-2008, 05:51 PM
WELL I never really thought there wouold be a market for little kids rpg thingy , and thought my kids where just wanting to play like mommy and daddy!

but yea I can make twenty five page book with illustrations, and a map or board. I now am teaching my twin five year olds and use the figures from DnD minitures.


Just a reminder about getting it copyrighted first. I've seen a couple of people not get anything for all the work they put into something.

DrAwkward
02-21-2008, 06:05 PM
Just a reminder about getting it copyrighted first. I've seen a couple of people not get anything for all the work they put into something.

So don't publish through Gygax?

tesral
02-21-2008, 09:12 PM
Just a reminder about getting it copyrighted first. I've seen a couple of people not get anything for all the work they put into something.

Just to be pedantic. You get a copyright just by writing. This message is copyright me. But by the user agreement of the forum it is licensed for your use under the commons agreement.

What you are talking about is registering a copyright. Advisable for anything you plan to publish as it establishes when you did it, and the fact you got it registered. However it is not necessary to get a copyright. That comes simply by writing.

A cheaper and not as acceptable method is to mail yourself a copy of your work and do not open it. The postmark establishes a legally acceptable date for the prior art should it come up.

Everything you never wanted to know about copyright. (http://www.copyright.gov/)

Drohem
02-21-2008, 09:26 PM
That's a cool link, thanks!

tesral
02-21-2008, 09:35 PM
That's a cool link, thanks!

Google (http://www.google.com) is your friend.

cplmac
02-22-2008, 09:10 PM
What you are talking about is registering a copyright. Advisable for anything you plan to publish as it establishes when you did it, and the fact you got it registered.


This is what I'm talking about. This way they have registered, documented proof that the writting is their brain child.

nijineko
02-23-2008, 05:04 AM
A cheaper and not as acceptable method is to mail yourself a copy of your work and do not open it. The postmark establishes a legally acceptable date for the prior art should it come up.

i've done that before.... ^^

tesral
02-24-2008, 10:13 PM
i've done that before.... ^^

As have I. The work never got published the company folded.