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View Full Version : How old were you, your first time?



TAROT
02-12-2008, 01:01 AM
Roleplaying, that is. Ummmm, pen and paper roleplaying. :)

Mulsiphix
02-12-2008, 01:40 AM
Introduced to BattleTech when I was 16 years old. Quite the old fogie among this croud I suspect :p

Freejack
02-12-2008, 07:45 AM
19 when I was introduced to Original D&D (speaking of old fogies :D )

Carl

Drohem
02-12-2008, 09:20 AM
I was 15 when I was introduced to RPGs through 2e Gamma World.

jade von delioch
02-12-2008, 10:40 AM
i was something like 16 i think, friend of mine kept telling me about what he did in this game he was playing and how i should try it out. so i did and have not stopped since. RPGs got me into reading as well.

Farcaster
02-12-2008, 12:38 PM
Well, the title certainly got my attention... :D

The first time I really played was around 12. I had been playing computer based RPGs for some time before that though, including such classics as Bards Tale and Might and Magic. So, my stepfather thought I might also enjoy RPGs and suggested I check them out. It wasn't long before I found myself a fellow roleplayer to game with while hovering around and reading some of the AD&D books at the good ole' neighborhood Waldenbooks.

nijineko
02-12-2008, 02:36 PM
well, the first time i actually played i was 12 or 13 or so. but i had been reading the books obsessively before that. ^^ and playing autoduel. i was thrilled when i found out it was a computer version of car wars. ^^

and i was even younger than that when i first started playing nemesis. on the good old actrix computer. nemesis was a d&d-based game that was quite innovative for it's time. it was text based, but the cursor was your guy, and you could actually move around the blank screen and explore the map, which was revealed as you moved around. complete with doors, walls, open rooms, traps, secret doors, randomly found treasure, and wandering monsters. plus you could create your own custom magic items, weapons, and armor. it rocked! sort of like nethack, but the map took up the whole screen.

Mulsiphix
02-12-2008, 02:50 PM
nijineko's story reminds me of the good old days when video games were about fun and not graphics. Even the early consoles were that way. I think it is sad how so much is based on appearance these days. Thank goodness for folks like you and the human imagination :)

tesral
02-12-2008, 09:09 PM
Dave and Gary had to invent it first. The only reason I didn't get started sooner.

Mulsiphix
02-12-2008, 09:12 PM
So how old were you tesral?

tesral
02-12-2008, 09:31 PM
So how old were you tesral?

18. Started playing in 1976.

rabkala
02-12-2008, 10:03 PM
The first time...
About 10.

Oh ya, but I didn't inhale.

Mulsiphix
02-13-2008, 12:04 AM
Oh ya, but I didn't inhale.I wasn't as wise as you were. I've still got internal scarring from inhaling those pewter miniatures. Everybody was doing it... I just wanted to be cool you know? :(

nijineko
02-13-2008, 01:35 AM
18. Started playing in 1976.

heh. that's about when my dad bought his white box set. i was... ah... too little at the time to be interested.

although, i must admit i'm proud to say that my son stole his first peek at my gaming books at the ripe young age of 1. i even have some pictures we took of him looking at them. =D that was after he managed to kick my computer in just exactly the right way and turn it on, of course. i'll post a pic at some point.

TAROT
02-13-2008, 02:04 AM
I wasn't as wise as you were. I've still got internal scarring from inhaling those pewter miniatures. Everybody was doing it... I just wanted to be cool you know? :(

We didn't have the fancy-shmancy pewwwter. We had lead, and we liked it. (Unless we wanted to bend something, then not so much.)

I was 10. Magenta box D&D. My mom said, "Hey, you might like this."

Dravion
02-13-2008, 04:33 AM
I was like 6 years old when I first started playing D&D. And I haven't regretted it since, some 20 years later.

boulet
02-13-2008, 07:26 AM
I think I was twelve and it was 1984... It was probably as early as a French version of D&D (basic) had been available. I spotted it in a catalog and I was quite disappointed realizing there was no figurine in the box... Then I actually read the content and I was hooked :D The irony is the figurines didn't interest me anymore just a couple years later. As mr Tweedy says : "It's all in your head"

Mulsiphix
02-13-2008, 10:35 AM
We didn't have the fancy-shmancy pewwwter. We had lead, and we liked it. (Unless we wanted to bend something, then not so much.)Pfft TAROT please :rolleyes:. We had plenty of lead mini's. They just went down smooth ;)

Farcaster
02-13-2008, 11:32 AM
18. Started playing in 1976.

That was the year I was born!

nijineko
02-13-2008, 02:33 PM
hah! i'm a couple of years older than you, farcaster. i was born the year that d&d was published, so i consider it a sibling of sorts. yes, a strange sibling that i grew up around, but never got to know until i was almost a teenager.... ^^

Mulsiphix
02-13-2008, 06:20 PM
That makes Gygax a father figure. I don't know if that is cool or terrifying :eek:.

aarathi
02-13-2008, 11:28 PM
I am 15 years old when i was playing pnp RPG.

boulet
02-14-2008, 08:30 AM
Hey Aarathi !

Why don't you post a new thread in the Introduction (http://www.penandpapergames.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=5) subforum ? I'm so glad that members are coming from different part of the globe. I'm looking forward to read if pen and paper game are popular in Kerala.

tesral
02-14-2008, 08:48 AM
We didn't have the fancy-shmancy pewwwter. We had lead, and we liked it. (Unless we wanted to bend something, then not so much.)

I was 10. Magenta box D&D. My mom said, "Hey, you might like this."

Lead bent great, pweter is harder. I had to fight my Mother tooth and nail over D&D with Matt. She has not a clue what the game is about and doesn't like it. She didn't want him playing "That game". My take was there is nothing harmful about this. I would much rather have him share my hobby than drinking or doing drugs. She blames it for anything that happens she doesn't like including the recession and global warming.

Guess who won?

nijineko
02-14-2008, 09:00 AM
That makes Gygax a father figure. I don't know if that is cool or terrifying :eek:.

hey! don't forget the daves!

Mulsiphix
02-14-2008, 09:43 AM
hey! don't forget the daves!THERE IS ONLY GYGAX! ALL HAIL THE FüR! :eek:

nijineko
02-14-2008, 10:18 AM
dude, dave arneson teaches at a college down here if florida, don't knock him! ;) you'll never guess what he teaches, either. what? you guessed game balance and design? nuts, you got it right. ^^

tesral
02-14-2008, 10:40 AM
THERE IS ONLY GYGAX! ALL HAIL THE FüR! :eek:

Avoid the koolaide, really.

Drohem
02-14-2008, 12:04 PM
Shh!! Don't invoke his name or he'll kick in your door one day.

Mulsiphix
02-14-2008, 01:24 PM
Shh!! Don't invoke his name or he'll kick in your door one day.*whispers* he is already here... within me... gnawing at my soul... clawing endlessly at the floorboards of my mind :eek:

Drohem
02-14-2008, 02:17 PM
"We're going for a little ride, Mulisphix. Get in the car," Drohem said in a pleasant voice.

Next stop Arkham Asylum.

tesral
02-14-2008, 04:33 PM
*whispers* he is already here... within me... gnawing at my soul... clawing endlessly at the floorboards of my mind :eek:

He hates new age music, listen to some for the next twelve hours straight.

spotlight
02-14-2008, 04:46 PM
I heard some where that HE don't like long hair music, either. Long live Betov-AACCh ach, he gots me, hep, hheepp!

at5115
02-14-2008, 05:28 PM
I was 21 and had helped the GM (a good friend of mine) drag up an old headstone from the "headstone pit" (they were replacing stones in the older cemetery and crushing the old ones) to adorn his night's session of Vampire. He promised to let me play Diplomacy if I helped. I ended up staying to watch these guys pretend to be vampires and werewolves.

While that facet of it wasn't for me, I did get invited to a DnD (2e) game later that year. I have to say that the first time I rolled a natural 20, enabling me to jump over a bonfire and behead some random baddie, I was totally hooked.

Melefresh

Mulsiphix
02-15-2008, 03:11 PM
*mumbles under his breath* he is free...
*head drops light like an anvil from its stand*
*you notice a shallow rippling across his skin and smell the faint smell of raw meat*

tesral
02-16-2008, 04:35 AM
I heard some where that HE don't like long hair music, either. Long live Betov-AACCh ach, he gots me, hep, hheepp!

CLASSICAL MAN tooo the rescue!!

I play violin at him.

rabkala
02-16-2008, 09:37 AM
I was 21 and had helped the GM (a good friend of mine) drag up an old headstone from the "headstone pit" (they were replacing stones in the older cemetery and crushing the old ones) to adorn his night's session of Vampire. He promised to let me play Diplomacy if I helped. I ended up staying to watch these guys pretend to be vampires and werewolves.

While that facet of it wasn't for me, I did get invited to a DnD (2e) game later that year. I have to say that the first time I rolled a natural 20, enabling me to jump over a bonfire and behead some random baddie, I was totally hooked.

Melefresh

Most of my experience with Larp Vampire players was also somewhat disturbing, no matter what age.
Good thing you found a good Pen and paper game. :)

boulet
02-16-2008, 10:54 AM
Most of my experience with Larp Vampire players was also somewhat disturbing, no matter what age.
Good thing you found a good Pen and paper game. :)

Same thing for me. I love World of Darkness in general but LARPers are really in a different dimension. It's funny but I can relate better to wargamers than to LARP freaks. Many of them tried to convince me that it was the next important step for me to enjoy role playing. Always been a disappointment, even the fantasy kind in a nice castle, and I can't really put the finger on why it is.

cplmac
02-16-2008, 09:30 PM
CLASSICAL MAN tooo the rescue!!

I play violin at him.


Give me a set of crash cymbals and I'll have his ears ringing so much that it won't matter.

Oh yeah, I got a late start at gaming. I was 24 and in the Persian Gulf at the time.

tesral
02-16-2008, 10:32 PM
Oh yeah, I got a late start at gaming. I was 24 and in the Persian Gulf at the time.

Lousy place to start anything. Glad you got out, hopefully with all the parts you went in with.

Nord_drache
02-16-2008, 11:22 PM
I started gaming at the age of 15 in 1978. First edition AD&D - Hardcovers - with monks and bards.
I was DMing a year later.

cplmac
02-17-2008, 09:35 AM
Lousy place to start anything. Glad you got out, hopefully with all the parts you went in with.


Yes I did, and a new liking for AD&D. We got to do just enough over there to make it interesting, but it was long periods between being able to do any gaming. When we got back, we decided to start the adventure over, since we were not that far along anyway.

nijineko
02-17-2008, 12:42 PM
cool! did anything different in the adventure the second time around? just out of curiosity.

cplmac
02-17-2008, 05:53 PM
cool! did anything different in the adventure the second time around? just out of curiosity.


Actually yes. The second time, we knew to ask for all kind of ordinary gear that would have cost a bundle to buy. Since the items we were being sent to recover were so valuable, the people sending us out were willing to be rather gracious with supplies (horses, wagons, food, beverage, and arrows).

nijineko
02-19-2008, 05:11 AM
heheheh. i've done that one before. as long as you don't ask for magic items, or out of the ordinary spells, and normal equipment, one can pick up a fair amount of savings.

cplmac
02-19-2008, 09:23 PM
heheheh. i've done that one before. as long as you don't ask for magic items, or out of the ordinary spells, and normal equipment, one can pick up a fair amount of savings.


I'm not sure if it was the fact the a couple of the guys in our party had been playing for years and knew to ask for all that stuff, or if it was because this was the very first time for the guy that was our DM. Out of the 9 of us, including the DM, 6 of us were doing this for the very first time.

rabkala
02-19-2008, 09:43 PM
I once asked to use a wagon, DM said yes. I then told all the players to ask for just about everything they could possibly imagine. DM said we could have all the normal items we asked for. I filled up the wagon and drove it into town to sell all the junk. Boy was he mad at the hundreds of gold we acquired that way! :D

nijineko
02-20-2008, 06:17 AM
beware the merchant pcs... for they have lots of stuff. ;D

(should make a prestige or template for that... get to sell your stuff at market value rather than half as a class ability....)

cplmac
02-20-2008, 12:37 PM
I once asked to use a wagon, DM said yes. I then told all the players to ask for just about everything they could possibly imagine. DM said we could have all the normal items we asked for. I filled up the wagon and drove it into town to sell all the junk. Boy was he mad at the hundreds of gold we acquired that way! :D


A trick I learned from that first DM to help offset the chance of the party getting a huge ammount of gold is to at best, let them sale stuff but they only get half price for it, at best. Only once did I have a group question this, but I pointed out that the merchant they were selling the stuff to had to be able to make a living. If he gave them regular price for the item, then he would have to try to sell it at a higher price. They agreed that they would not want to have to pay extra for stuff.

spotlight
02-20-2008, 04:53 PM
Say Rabkala, your first name ain't Monty, is it? That wagon sure made it a real Haul!!

By the way, thanx fer the save, teseral and cpl.

My brother reminded me of something yesterday. Thou my first experience at rpg was at age 18 (C. 1975), He and I did have a space game that came in a little plastic pouch about ten years before that. We liked it so much, I actuall drew a hexagonal map on a painted wall in our bedroom and we used thumb tacks to represent the units and stuff.

A few years ago, the kids and I went out to the Homeplace, the map was still visible. I just wish I could recall the name of that simple game.

rabkala
02-24-2008, 08:02 PM
Say Rabkala, your first name ain't Monty, is it? That wagon sure made it a real Haul!!.

:D:p

One of the best things about having many years of experience is catching the younger players trying to pull stunts I actually did about 25 years ago.

Nord_drache
02-25-2008, 08:12 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by spotlight http://www.penandpapergames.com/forums/Greys/buttons/viewpost.gif (http://www.penandpapergames.com/forums/showthread.php?p=24306#post24306)
Say Rabkala, your first name ain't Monty, is it? That wagon sure made it a real Haul!!.



:D:p

One of the best things about having many years of experience is catching the younger players trying to pull stunts I actually did about 25 years ago.

I guess it just goes to show everything old is new again. I don't know too many player who haven't gone through a Monty Haul phase - its just monetary power gaming. It usually goes away when the thrill has gone.

Its actually more fun to take a Monty Haul / power gamer and introduce them to good roleplaying and see them change.

Webhead
02-27-2008, 10:50 PM
My first experience with RPGs was when I was about 13 and a new friend I played Magic: The Gathering with (back when it first started and was actually cool) asked me if I'd ever heard of AD&D. We played a few "no-rules" adventures (to that date I had never seen any rule books for AD&D) but not much else came out of that.

About a year later, I learned that West End Games was publishing a Star Wars RPG and for the several weeks while I was waiting for my pre-order book to come in, I was already running a campaign (with no rules, of course) with a friend over the phone 4 or 5 nights a week. In fact, I still have the scribbly notes on faded scraps of paper that I took during that game. Probably one of the coolest campaigns I ever ran.

The rest, as they say, is history...

boulet
02-28-2008, 10:29 AM
Very interesting first experience Webhead ! One can say you have pure role-play in your blood. Who needs rules anyway ? :)

tesral
02-28-2008, 12:08 PM
Very interesting first experience Webhead ! One can say you have pure role-play in your blood. Who needs rules anyway ? :)

At the most basic level RPG is "let's pretend" as played by every child on the planet. The main differences are the moderator "Gamemaster" that writes and directs the action, and the fact you have a rules set to handle the random aspects. But at the very core it's cowboys & Indians, cops & robbers or any number of let's pretend game. We just use dice to handle the incidents of "I shot you!" "No you didn't!"

I too was "Role-playing" before I knew that systems existed. In the case of my friends and I the shared Universe was Star Trek. We created characters and invented adventures. Once D&D got invented and came down our way we jumped on it with everything.

I still write stories about that first character. Jerry LaSaille. (http://phoenixinn.iwarp.com/startrek/stories.html#jerry)

Webhead
02-28-2008, 04:55 PM
Very interesting first experience Webhead ! One can say you have pure role-play in your blood. Who needs rules anyway ? :)

Thanks. The Star Wars campaign in particular was a lot of fun. I have to chalk it up a lot to my friend being one of the most awesome players I ever knew, but there was never once during that game that I encountered a "I shot you!...No you didn't!" situation. The game mostly revolved around a "Ok, this is happening, what does your character do?" play style. It was a very stimulus-response kind of thing. This meant, in part, that combat for example tended to play out in broader exchanges instead of by finely structured "rounds". I would set the scene, he would describe his general tactic and I would narrate the scene accordingly...lather, rinse, repeat. Perhaps we were more innocent or enamoured by the sheer fact that we were "roleplaying" but we both had a mutual acceptance and respect for what the other was contributing to the direction of the story and thus I can never recall us arguing over anything in the game. This is something I sorely miss during my past few years of gaming, as many games have tended to reek of players distrusting the GM or vice versa, disolving into a contest of "who knows the rules more thoroughly". Blech...

It is for this reason that I continue to have a fascination with "rules-lite" games. Games that let you paint your characters in broad strokes and have just enough rules to establish "random and arbitrary" resolution (by rolling dice), but don't focus on the rules as the central part of the game and don't limit your imagination by forcing it to conform to the rules.

Even though I almost never get to actually play them (because my friends think they are too lite for their tastes), I have a soft spot for games like Risus, Wushu, The Pool, and Spirit of the Century for this reason.

Of course, I like some of my games with a little heavier rules as well, but I find the heavier and more intricate the rules get, the less attached I get with the game. If playing in such games, I tend to find other ways to enjoy myself (usually by creating oddball or quirky characters), as the rules-mongering holds little lasting appeal for me.

nijineko
02-29-2008, 12:50 AM
i used to scribble out maps and narrate the adventures of the various kids going through them out on the playgrounds in elementary school. ^^

hippie_mama
02-29-2008, 10:58 AM
18, but i was a "significant other" gamer; wasn't really into it. I was 23 when I found my love for RP. Now I'm insatiable. *winks*

But I also played TMNT on the playground in Kindergarten, if that counts. :D

tesral
02-29-2008, 12:41 PM
18, but i was a "significant other" gamer; wasn't really into it. I was 23 when I found my love for RP. Now I'm insatiable. *winks*

But I also played TMNT on the playground in Kindergarten, if that counts. :D

Me and my friends played Batman & Robin among other things. Run around the yard with a towel pinned to your shirt. I guess that makes us early LARPers. ;)

Every kid does this. RPG is the same thing with more structure.

Webhead
02-29-2008, 03:15 PM
Me and my friends played Batman & Robin among other things. Run around the yard with a towel pinned to your shirt. I guess that makes us early LARPers. ;)

Every kid does this. RPG is the same thing with more structure.


Sure. The main difference being, as you said, the presence of a "Game Master" who directs the action.

Man, I remember using clothes pins and towels to play "super hero". Good memories! :)

boulet
02-29-2008, 04:05 PM
There's another analogy with childhood that I like even if it's a little creepy. It's those moments when I tortured innocent insects, burning them or dismembering them and I'm not proud of it. But well, ants and flies, it doesn't make me feel awfully guilty either. Still I'm really glad that roleplaying has come to my life to let me explore some perverse aspects of life, within boundaries for sure, but still accomplishing something in the field of catharsis. I wouldn't let it become the center of my games or roles, I wouldn't let it go out of hand, but there's no doubt I enjoyed being bad by procuration of my PCs or NPCs once in a while. Game systems that give you the opportunity to be a monster, litteraly or not, thrive on that.

I know media have been very focused on this issue and by reaction some player are uncomfortable discussing it. But 99% of players are able to keep this inside the realm of fiction. And the 1% who aren't able to do that are mental to begin with IMO. They don't need any specific excuse like RPG in order to turn bad in real life. Their lack of sanity would find other modus operandi to express in real transgressions or acts of violence. For the normal majority of players role playing is a healthy way to purge some frustrations and tensions. At least I think so.

hippie_mama
03-01-2008, 10:03 AM
There's another analogy with childhood that I like even if it's a little creepy...
I see what you're saying; RP can be a healthy way to express or explore parts of one's imagination/personality that have no place in daily life. You can play out a personality that is as different from your own as you can imagine, and no one will accuse you of being schizo (well, ok, your gamer buds won't at least).

I've got a pretty good example of this. I made a Heroes Unlimited character on nothing but random rolls; education and powers rolled random from the book; personality random-rolled from roll tables of doom that the GM had. She ended up being a Lycanthropic stripper with Adhesion and Physical Perfection. Her personality was selfish, slutty, and short-tempered. I don't think i could have come up with a bigger cliche if i had tried. But i wanted to really test myself, so i played it. The first few sessions were HARD. I hate the idea of playing a very attractive character (it's just so over-done) and i think in-game promiscuity is lame (and even more over-done). I wanted to be nice to the other PCs, but i knew she wouldn't be unless there was something in it for her, and there wasn't. Over time i started to really *get* her; i started to understand the hows and whys of someone ending up like her, understood her motivation (or lack thereof, whichever the case may be in each situation). She evolved as a person as she was faced with more and more adversity. I've played her nearly every week for almost a year, and she is probably the most complex/interesting/realistic character i have ever played. And she is nothing at all like me.

boulet
03-01-2008, 10:09 AM
Thanks for sharing Hippie_mama !(pfeew I thought I killed a thread again)

hippie_mama
03-01-2008, 10:15 AM
(pfeew I thought I killed a thread again)
I'm new here. You do that a lot? ;)

Webhead
03-01-2008, 10:27 AM
This is all very true. Many (or probably even most) people who play RPGs tend to be attracted to the idea of seeing what it's like to live in someone else's shoes. To take someone very socially/mentally/physically different from yourself and try to understand why they do what they do and thus how they would react in a given situation.

I know what you're saying about "attractive" and "promiscuous" characters being overdone, and I find it interesting (and encouraging) that you were able to run with it and really get something out of the experience beyond just playing up the cliche. Very well done! I think this kind of involvement with your character is what seperates a cliche from a real roleplaying opportunity.

I've certainly played many characters who were very personally divergent from myself. I am a very passive person and detest the concept of personal violence, yet one of my best-loved RPG characters was a raging berserker-warrior. Its fun to change your way of thinking when you're inside the game as you can take actions that you would never even consider in real life.

nijineko
03-01-2008, 11:04 AM
i have not gone as far as some of you have described in playing characters that are nothing like one's self. so far, all of my characters have some aspect of my personality. (even if pretty small....) however, i have enjoyed learning about how and why people of radically different mindsets might think, via the parts of the characters that are not like me. also, in and out of game observations teach one a lot.... ^^

i made a comment elsewhere about a character of mine that fell in love with another character. i am unable to act such a thing out, but we discussed all the details out of game, and i was able to play the post-married character just fine.... just won't/can't manage the in-between bits. ^^ perhaps a result of the intense mental investment i make into my characters when playing them, combined with my own personal morals/ethics. it feels almost like running a "personality emulator" for me. it's always been easy for me to recreate mockups of other personalities in my head, just to see how they differ from oneself, and to see what they would do in a given situation.

<.<

>.>

we'll just blame that ability on my being a gemini, shall we?

hippie_mama
03-01-2008, 11:11 AM
I have a couple of current characters that have intimate relationships with other PCs. We just "cut scene" when it approaches the edge of someone's comfort level, and continue to make the GM (who happens to be my husband) uncomfortable with the harmless stuff. :rolleyes: It's no different from playing out a relationship in a movie though. We don't assume that the actors are hooked-up in real life, so there's no reason to take it personally in-game, as that's basically the same thing.

nijineko
03-01-2008, 11:16 AM
yeah, i'm aware. ^^ but i tend to be one of those, 'only with the wife', type of guys. which makes the wife happy, so i'm not to likely to try expanding my rp experiences that way. i've seen others pull it off, just not me. =D one of my quirks, i guess.

Webhead
03-01-2008, 11:47 AM
When tastefully done so as not to make folks feel uncomfortable, as you suggest above Hippie_mama, character romance/love/intimacy can make for a very interesting and flavorful twist to the game. I find that such a thing only really works when it develops organically within the game, otherwise the tendency becomes a "I wanna get my character laid" type of mentality which is less about developing a character's personality and more about the acting out of a player's repressed desires...which definately detracts from the game more than it contributes to it. I know...my character was once the target of a "My character tries to seduce your character" situation. The less said about that, the better.

Still, intimate character relationships are an uncommon thing in many games and can add something fun to the game if handled maturely.

nijineko
03-01-2008, 11:48 AM
hmmm, that happened to me once. i ran away. left a bad feel. :eek: maybe i have a virtual trauma via my character's experience! :rolleyes:

hippie_mama
03-01-2008, 12:29 PM
Woops, didn't mean to imply that in-character romance can or should be for everyone. A lot of people think it's hopelessly lame, at best. I'm on the fence about it; it depends completely on the characters, tone of the game, and players.

I also agree 100% that, if at all, it should develop organically. Neither of my characters had tried to "find herself a man" and i was certainly thinking quite the opposite myself. But both of them did the typical "fall for the guy most-hated in the group once things get intense" model.

Webhead
03-01-2008, 03:08 PM
Woops, didn't mean to imply that in-character romance can or should be for everyone.

I don't think you did. I hope *I* didn't give *you* the impression that I thought you were. :)

hippie_mama
03-02-2008, 01:11 PM
I don't think you did. I hope *I* didn't give *you* the impression that I thought you were. :)
You know, on most boards, people end up stumbling over one another's words due to misunderstanding and jumping to conclusions. We seem to be stumbling over our own words in hopes of not offending one another. That's certainly a big change to what i'm used to! These forums are much more friendly than what i'm accustomed to; i think i'll get comfy now. :D

boulet
03-02-2008, 11:13 PM
And you didn't spot the mini-bar yet !

hippie_mama
03-03-2008, 01:31 PM
And you didn't spot the mini-bar yet !
What!? Even better! :D

tesral
03-03-2008, 04:07 PM
You know, on most boards, people end up stumbling over one another's words due to misunderstanding and jumping to conclusions. We seem to be stumbling over our own words in hopes of not offending one another. That's certainly a big change to what i'm used to! These forums are much more friendly than what i'm accustomed to; i think i'll get comfy now. :D

Simple rule, do not be offensive, and do be easily offended.

There is no right to not be offended. If someone is offended easily I am of the opinion they need to be offeded until they grow a thicker skin.

That said I do not set out to offend anyone.

nijineko
03-04-2008, 02:59 AM
likewise, i didn't get that impression from your post. =D and this way, we're pretty sure you won't hog all the stools at the mini-bar. ^^

i was suddenly reminded by farcaster's interview with rpgx, that my first exposure to d&d was actually earlier than i had previously remembered. he had mentioned bard's tale... i used to play a very old game called nemesis on the actrix computer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Actrix_(computer)) running cp/m os. ^^ it was ascii-graphics based with a text menu for the castle where you could rest, heal, build weapons and armor-have them enchanted too, as well as save and exit. or you could enter the dungeon and explore.

your guy was the cursor, and you had a wide selection of classes and races to choose from. my favorite was the grey-elf sage. i couldn't think of anything to name him, so i would up calling him sarge. i always picked grey-elf because the game tracked your time in the dungeons and aged you. they had the longest life-span. the sage could cast both arcane and divine and had a minor amount of fighting ability. i would sit there for hours trying to roll up good stats. and then hours more playing.

the game had several unique and advanced aspects. first off, it tracked the passage of time and aged your character. too old, and you couldn't be effective anymore or would die. second, it tracked time while you were playing-it was effectively "real-time" in a crude way. it would check for random encounters (including finding items laying on the ground) every set amount of time. third, your screen (all 7" of it) was the map. the cursor would move around the screen revealing the ascii symbols that represented pillars, fountains, walls, and so forth. some rooms were trapped, others were monster-heavy. fourth, the class level titles, the monsters, and the magic items were ripped right out of d&d. so this was effectively a version of d&d i was playing. =D

i used to have these print-out maps of each of the first 9 levels i had managed to explore (without getting killed!), complete with marks for fire/ice traps and pits and so forth. even a few magic mouths around the area. ^^

in any case, very fond memories. ^^ i had to have been... what, 8? 9? something like that. =D

8cidx
03-06-2008, 10:54 AM
Ironically I was working on my own PnP before I knew what they were.
I thought I had this great original idea that no one had thought of before. Then one of my friends who I invited to try it out was like "Dude, this works allot like D&D."

he couldn't believe that I didn't know what he was talking about. He showed me where to buy the books. i read them, but just took from them what I wanted for my own game.

About a year later after my parents devorce, my mom married a guy who DMed. So I kind of got into it that way, but I picked up really quick and loved it. Since then I have been a genre fiend.

mrken
03-11-2008, 10:54 PM
You guys are making me feel old. Lol DnD hadn’t even been invented when I graduated from high school. I spent four years in the Air Force, a year working for the city and two years driving a truck all over the country before college. My last year at school one of the kids who would come over to our house to party invited me to hang out with some of his friends.

Down stairs in the basement of this old house, with all the lights out and just a bunch of candles burning, were a bunch of guys in costume. The GM had a long beard and a pointy hat, sat on a throne, and spoke like an old man. My friend put on his helmet and chain mail shirt then belted on a sword. I was, to be sure, impressed as some guy with a bow greeted me with a bow. Everyone spoke with an accent and I was in some dungeon room back in the dark ages. Any wonder that I was hooked?

These guys all knew me from my work covering the plays as a photographer with the yearbook and the newspaper, but I couldn’t recognize any of them for the makeup and costumes. They helped me create a fighter character that night and then let my character get killed every night we played, for a couple of months.

One day my friend told me of another group that wouldn’t kill off my character every week. That was the last time I ever played with people from the dark ages. Even the dwarf and the elf were real down there in that dark and musty dungeon where the only light was the candles burning on that ancient table.

Unfortunately the next game was Traveler and my character was killed three times before we actually got to play that first night. After one semester of playing I realized that I was addicted.

After graduating I learned how many rules one had to know to run a game. Argh! I felt the rules suffocated the life out of the game. The guys down in that basement never used rulebooks and their characters lived real lives down there. For the last twenty years I have been on a personal crusade to get the players to lay down their books and just play. Seems I haven’t made a very big dent in the RP world.

tesral
03-12-2008, 07:27 AM
After graduating I learned how many rules one had to know to run a game. Argh! I felt the rules suffocated the life out of the game. The guys down in that basement never used rulebooks and their characters lived real lives down there. For the last twenty years I have been on a personal crusade to get the players to lay down their books and just play. Seems I haven’t made a very big dent in the RP world.

Good luck with that. We don't reference books often. The more role-playing in your role-playing the less books you need.

Webhead
03-12-2008, 11:08 AM
Aye. The attitude of too many gamers that I meet often seems to be: "You can have my rulebook when you pry it from my cold, dead fingers!"

Interesting experience though, mrken. I definately would like to have seen that. The closest I've ever been to "dress up" roleplaying was at a Vampire LARP, which gave the goth-wannabes an excuse to wear eye-liner and trenchcoats.

8cidx
03-13-2008, 08:26 AM
Yeah, not so much into larping... I like to create mood other ways.

RealmsDM
03-15-2008, 09:57 AM
I learned to read by flipping through my older brothers' D&D books! I was the only kid in 1st grade that could tell you the AC & climate/terrain of a ogre mage

Webhead
03-15-2008, 11:30 AM
I learned to read by flipping through my older brothers' D&D books! I was the only kid in 1st grade that could tell you the AC & climate/terrain of a ogre mage


Ah, yes. I was the older brother in my version of your scenario and it was my younger brother who (around 2nd grade) learned all about RPGs from me. He still plays to this day (in fact, he supposedly started running a new Star Wars D6 campaign yesterday...I should call to find out how it went).

Drohem
03-15-2008, 12:45 PM
I was a rebel against the click scene of Jr. High/High School. In the 10th grade, I hung around with a buddy in a wheel-chair and a guy who just moved from AZ. He introduced us to 2nd Gamma World at lunch in the library. After we played that and got the hang of RPGs, he then showed us Star Frontiers, and then finally 1st AD&D. He had me at Gamma World, LOL!

Webhead
03-15-2008, 09:56 PM
I was a rebel against the click scene of Jr. High/High School. In the 10th grade, I hung around with a buddy in a wheel-chair and a guy who just moved from AZ. He introduced us to 2nd Gamma World at lunch in the library. After we played that and got the hang of RPGs, he then showed us Star Frontiers, and then finally 1st AD&D. He had me at Gamma World, LOL!


I hear ya! Gamma World is a ton of fun. I actually have my 2nd edition Gamma World box set and Star Frontiers sitting on the shelf about 5 feet behind me. :D

Awww...remember when RPGs came in boxes? :)

cplmac
03-16-2008, 01:18 PM
Eventhough I'm relatively new to gaming compared to some ( i.e. tesral and others), I do have a boxed set of D&D. It is not one of the originals though. I actually bought this in the mid 1990's. It is rather basic.

nijineko
03-23-2008, 03:36 AM
i have owned something like three different boxed sets of star frontiers: both alpha dawn and knight hawks... i keep finding people who will pay me more than i did acquiring them.... or they find me. sigh, one of these days i'll finally keep one in my hands!

mrken
03-23-2008, 10:39 AM
Three different boxes sets of Star Frontiers? Somehow I totally missed a third set. Must have been before my time. lol Star Frontiers was the first game I GM’d back in 85. The Alpha Dawn boxed set was found in a department store discount bin just before I graduated; the Knight Hawks boxed set was in a game store I never knew existed in my home town. Bought all the modules as soon as they appeared. Played three different campaigns with three different groups. Some of the people I game with have been talking out loud about playing a Sci-fi game. Maybe that game will have to come back out.

Frobozz
03-24-2008, 11:40 PM
I believe I was exactly 8 years old when my parents picked me up my first RPG, an old, red-box single game manual Dungeons and Dragons Basic set with B2 - The Keep on the Boarderlands, cruddy dice and a wax crayon.

I hounded them for Dungeons and Dragons from hearing the stories of two older children I used to walk home from school with. I didn't really know how to really play it for about another 3-4 years. :)

I still got that set in pretty darned good condition :D

sreeja
04-03-2008, 01:51 AM
I am in the range of twenty and some thing.That is i am 24 years old.What about you all?

Webhead
04-03-2008, 02:27 PM
I am in the range of twenty and some thing.That is i am 24 years old.What about you all?

Was that the age you started gaming or your current age (or both)?

blackmote
04-08-2008, 10:11 AM
I started playing the original D&D game (red box if I recall) Jan 1983 at the age of 16. By that summer we had discovered the AD&D books through a cousin of mine. The only break I have taken from regular gaming since that time was for most of the last 5 years.

I'll be 42 this year, and I am starting a new AD&D 2E campaign this coming weekend with a group of players here in the metro Atlanta area who I managed to bring together through various forums.

:cool:

Omegaman
04-08-2008, 08:23 PM
I think I was 10 when we started playing AD&D. I can remember the day the Forgotten Realms came out and we shifted our whole campaign to the realms.

Valdar
04-09-2008, 04:15 PM
10. I still remember my 4th grade teacher taking away our 20 siders for rolling them in class. That would have been 1981.

Inquisitor Tremayne
04-09-2008, 04:24 PM
I was 12ish when I was first introduced.

The first books I got when I was about 16.

The first "real" game was when I was 21-22.

tella.star
04-17-2008, 12:04 PM
16 years old was my age when i first tried playing rpg

tesral
04-17-2008, 08:28 PM
I am in the range of twenty and some thing.That is i am 24 years old.What about you all?


Age = me > dirt

cplmac
04-18-2008, 10:37 AM
I started playing the original D&D game (red box if I recall) Jan 1983 at the age of 16. By that summer we had discovered the AD&D books through a cousin of mine. The only break I have taken from regular gaming since that time was for most of the last 5 years.

I'll be 42 this year, and I am starting a new AD&D 2E campaign this coming weekend with a group of players here in the metro Atlanta area who I managed to bring together through various forums.

:cool:


I hear ya. Haven't got to game much since the oldest daughter was born 2 1/2 years ago. Hard to get everyone's schedule to match up at times.

Your group needs to move closer. I have a 2E campaign already to go.

knightserpent
04-24-2008, 09:21 AM
I was in my late teens when I started with V:tM. It wasn't until much later that D&D came into my life (with 3e), and we've been happy ever since.

Malruhn
04-26-2008, 01:33 PM
I voted, but didn't post... go figure!

I was 18, and had just pledged a frat in my first year of college (1980).

A buddy, who was pledging a rival frat, showed up at breakfast in the cafeteria all bleary eyed and looking whooped. When I asked if his "hell week" had started already, he said, "No. We were in this forest looking for orcs, and these wolves attacked us over and over. I killed like four of them before they stopped. We never did find out where the orcs went."

I just stared at him, mouth agape.

That night I rolled up my first character - with that rival fraternity - and haven't looked back since. I'm coming up on 28 years of playing happiness.

SpiffyBananaFoot
04-26-2008, 05:13 PM
I got the blue box and my brother got the red box. We opened the boxes and read through the books. My cousin really got hooked to it and not long after we were going through the keep and the caves not to far away from it.

EJS
04-29-2008, 11:16 PM
Started with D&D when I was 8 back around 1985 with the red and blue book in the box. Switched to 6D Star Wars and Battletech in 1990. Soon stoped since no one in the rural midwest played. 2007 I returned to D&D, still looking for a solid group to play. Being trying to get into RPGA and plan to cheek out Pathfinder Society see if this makes things better.

Lancer
04-30-2008, 01:42 PM
I don't even remember exactly when I got started gaming. Ehh, probably around 14 years old. I am 29 now.

Anyhow, I got started with the 4th revision of the Basic Set or the "New Easy to Master Dungeons and Dragons game (http://www.acaeum.com/ddindexes/setpages/setscans/basic91box.html)" - That was a nice appetizer which prepped me up for the real deal in the Rules Cyclopedia...

agoraderek
05-07-2008, 10:36 AM
i was nine (in 79), started with AD&D, but we didnt have a monster manual, just the PHB and DMG. the first dungeon i "designed" was a keep where demons had captured the humans. the first room featured 20 humans guarded by six demogorgons, a daddy demogorgon, a mommie demogorgon, and four baby demogorgon's playing with the human kids.

my game has evolved to a (slightly) higher level of sophistication since...

tesral
05-07-2008, 10:47 AM
The first room featured 20 humans guarded by six demogorgons, a daddy demogorgon, a mommie demogorgon, and four baby demogorgon's playing with the human kids.

my game has evolved to a (slightly) higher level of sophistication since...

What no doggy demogorgon?

Yea, I hear you. I was bit older, but hey they had to invent the game first.

agoraderek
05-07-2008, 06:55 PM
What no doggy demogorgon?

Yea, I hear you. I was bit older, but hey they had to invent the game first.


hey, i was nine! they hadnt invented templates yet! :laugh:

yeah, those were scary days until we got a hold of a copy of "the village of homlett" and had some idea what an adventure was supposed to look like. by the time we hit junior high, we were going pretty good, and the kernel for the homebrew world ive used most of my gaming life was sown...

Edit: oh, yeah, and finally getting a monster manual (thanks mom!) helped immensely (who knew deomgorgon was "unique"?)...

tesral
05-08-2008, 12:07 AM
hey, i was nine! they hadnt invented templates yet! :laugh:

yeah, those were scary days until we got a hold of a copy of "the village of homlett" and had some idea what an adventure was supposed to look like. by the time we hit junior high, we were going pretty good, and the kernel for the homebrew world ive used most of my gaming life was sown...

Edit: oh, yeah, and finally getting a monster manual (thanks mom!) helped immensely (who knew deomgorgon was "unique"?)...

The Monster Manual was the first of the AD&D books released. And we considered it a godsend. Before that you had to look up three spots in two books to get all the monster's stats. An awkward situation to say the least. I remember that first gaming hardcover. $11.95 and the wonderful fresh from the printers smell of the book (long since faded).

I have to say this; the first AD&D books were quality binding and work. While the organization and writing could have used some work, the books themselves have withstood 29 years of use and abuse. They sit on my shelf today, rumpled stained worn and faded, but intact! More than can be said for many of the later releases and editions.

agoraderek
05-08-2008, 02:13 PM
The Monster Manual was the first of the AD&D books released. And we considered it a godsend. Before that you had to look up three spots in two books to get all the monster's stats. An awkward situation to say the least. I remember that first gaming hardcover. $11.95 and the wonderful fresh from the printers smell of the book (long since faded).

I have to say this; the first AD&D books were quality binding and work. While the organization and writing could have used some work, the books themselves have withstood 29 years of use and abuse. They sit on my shelf today, rumpled stained worn and faded, but intact! More than can be said for many of the later releases and editions.

i know the MM came out first, but we sort of "inherited" (appropriated?) the PHB and DMG from my friends cousin.

the only 1st ed book that wasnt bound well, as far as i can tell, was unearthed arcana. i havent met anyone whose first sixty pages didnt fall out of the binding within two months of use. but otherwise, the rest of my 1st ed books were still bound as tight as ever (i lost them all in 2000, unfortunately).

tesral
05-08-2008, 10:05 PM
the only 1st ed book that wasnt bound well, as far as i can tell, was unearthed arcana. i havent met anyone whose first sixty pages didnt fall out of the binding within two months of use. but otherwise, the rest of my 1st ed books were still bound as tight as ever (i lost them all in 2000, unfortunately).

Well now you have. Mine is still in one piece. I must have got the weird one that survived.

johnmarron
05-20-2008, 03:06 PM
I was 13 in 1976, and bugged my parents to buy me a game called "Empire of the Petal Throne". I got my friends at school to play, and we were all shocked when we went to our first gaming convention the next year (Gencon South in Jacksonville, FL) and saw all these people playing some weird game called "Dungeons and Dragons". My gaming has never been normal since...

John

tesral
05-20-2008, 04:41 PM
I was 13 in 1976, and bugged my parents to buy me a game called "Empire of the Petal Throne". I got my friends at school to play, and we were all shocked when we went to our first gaming convention the next year (Gencon South in Jacksonville, FL) and saw all these people playing some weird game called "Dungeons and Dragons". My gaming has never been normal since...

John

Game con is where I found D&D, in '76. However I went to play a war game. Never did play any war game, did come home with D&D and no, my life hasn't been normal since.

nijineko
05-21-2008, 06:57 PM
my life has never been 'normal'. roleplaying fit in nicely without any fuss. ^^ well, not from me, anyhow.

mrken
05-25-2008, 09:47 PM
My Unearthed Arcana is still in pretty good shape, of course I have always taken good care of my books. But one of my hobbies from childhood was collecting books, especially old ones. And, I am picky about loaning out my books, unlike my wife who will give books away without a thought.

agoraderek
05-26-2008, 04:59 AM
My Unearthed Arcana is still in pretty good shape, of course I have always taken good care of my books. But one of my hobbies from childhood was collecting books, especially old ones. And, I am picky about loaning out my books, unlike my wife who will give books away without a thought.

i'll lend out paperbacks without much thought, but my hardbacks and gaming books? i need some sort of "marker" or a swap (you want my underdark book? let me check out your arcana unearthed...)

mrken
05-26-2008, 12:52 PM
Perhaps I could let you use my Unearthed Arcana if you give me the keys to your car.

agoraderek
05-27-2008, 12:29 AM
Perhaps I could let you use my Unearthed Arcana if you give me the keys to your car.

lets see, original cavalier and barbarian (well, rulebook version, cant remember if they were deemed "official" when they appeared in dragon...), some cool spells (melf!) and magic items, and social classes, or not having to take a bus to work. hmmmm, at current gas prices, this could be a tough one...

cplmac
05-27-2008, 08:40 AM
lets see, original cavalier and barbarian (well, rulebook version, cant remember if they were deemed "official" when they appeared in dragon...), some cool spells (melf!) and magic items, and social classes, or not having to take a bus to work. hmmmm, at current gas prices, this could be a tough one...


The way gas keeps going up almost daily, it sounds like a good trade to get the book.

mrken
05-27-2008, 09:57 AM
Yeah, I'm having to run moonshine in my van. 87 octane is getting too expensive to put in my PU.

agoraderek
05-27-2008, 07:51 PM
Yeah, I'm having to run moonshine in my van. 87 octane is getting too expensive to put in my PU.

how many gallons of 87 octane can you get for dieties and demigods, moorcock/cthulhu edition, i wonder? :laugh:

mrken
05-27-2008, 10:41 PM
how many gallons of 87 octane can you get for dieties and demigods, moorcock/cthulhu edition, i wonder? :laugh:

I don't know, haven't really thought about it, but I think my wife would have a fit if I even suggested it. When she saw one sold at Gen Con back about 85, she almost went ballistic.

agoraderek
05-27-2008, 10:50 PM
I don't know, haven't really thought about it, but I think my wife would have a fit if I even suggested it. When she saw one sold at Gen Con back about 85, she almost went ballistic.

i sold one at an owlcon in 97 for $100 cash. i had two at the time, and needed to make a car payment, so...

tesral
05-27-2008, 11:30 PM
how many gallons of 87 octane can you get for dieties and demigods, moorcock/cthulhu edition, i wonder? :laugh:

I've got one, I may yet find out.

mrken
05-28-2008, 10:20 AM
My kids will inherit mine I think. Both are gamers, though more like powergaming munchkins. Though they still enjoy gaming with their dad they tend to run games for their friends while their dad runs games for the adults.

tesral
05-28-2008, 05:05 PM
My kids will inherit mine I think. Both are gamers, though more like powergaming munchkins. Though they still enjoy gaming with their dad they tend to run games for their friends while their dad runs games for the adults.


Different generation want different things from gaming. Younger gamers are in to wish fulfillment. Being powerful and getting what you want. Most people grow out of it. When I GM for younger gamers I take that into mind. I give them a game geared for the level they are ready for.

The sad ones are the 30 year-old gamers still playing like they did at 15.

Webhead
05-28-2008, 05:12 PM
Different generation want different things from gaming. Younger gamers are in to wish fulfillment. Being powerful and getting what you want. Most people grow out of it. When I GM for younger gamers I take that into mind. I give them a game geared for the level they are ready for.

The sad ones are the 30 year-old gamers still playing like they did at 15.

I agree with this assessment for the most part, but like any generalization, it isn't completely universal. I've met a number of "rare" cases of younger gamers who were surprisingly more interested in exciting stories than the typical wish-fulfillment. And then there are those who are just along for the ride. The youngsters who are caught up in the "hey, I'm roleplaying...cool!" frame of mind. :)

tesral
05-28-2008, 07:49 PM
I agree with this assessment for the most part, but like any generalization, it isn't completely universal.

As is always the case, except when it's not.

starfalconkd
05-28-2008, 09:27 PM
I was an eleven year old kid when I got THE RED BOX (bold, underline, and caps added for reverence). I purchased a 2nd edition PHB, DMG, and Monstrous Compendium shortly thereafter. Oh those were the days. As of August, my best friend and I will have been playing for twenty years. We're still friends, still play D&D, and man are we getting old.

Webhead
05-28-2008, 10:20 PM
As is always the case, except when it's not.

Anything is possible...including impossibilities. :D

tesral
05-29-2008, 01:01 AM
\We're still friends, still play D&D, and man are we getting old.

Kid.

starfalconkd
05-29-2008, 08:19 AM
Kid.

Compared to some. In your case I truly bow to a superior. You've been gaming since before I was born. :hail:

tesral
05-29-2008, 09:11 AM
Compared to some. In your case I truly bow to a superior. You've been gaming since before I was born. :hail:

You're not old. Don't make yourself old before you have to. I'm 50 and not old. Due to accumulated damage I can have days when I feel ancient, but I'm not old. Stay as young as you can as long as you can. Life will make you old way too soon, so don't help it.

Now, go play with some toys.

starfalconkd
05-29-2008, 05:10 PM
You're not old. Don't make yourself old before you have to. I'm 50 and not old. Due to accumulated damage I can have days when I feel ancient, but I'm not old. Stay as young as you can as long as you can. Life will make you old way too soon, so don't help it.

Now, go play with some toys.

I was mostly kidding about the old thing. It's kind of a running gag with me. We're all children in the grand scheme of things. I mean what's less than one hundred years in the life of a world?

victim666
06-01-2008, 08:37 AM
I watched my brother play many times when i was growing up and when I was 10 years old they invited me to play with em even though they were all 5 years or more my elders. That was 2nd edition D&D and we did act out alot of the RPing not just sitting at table.

agoraderek
06-01-2008, 06:08 PM
My kids will inherit mine I think. Both are gamers, though more like powergaming munchkins. Though they still enjoy gaming with their dad they tend to run games for their friends while their dad runs games for the adults.


"dad, tell me about cthulhu..."

pkostrze
06-03-2008, 04:09 AM
One of my friends introduced me to D&D back in 1978... and I passed. Man, I can be so short-sighted at times. I finally got into pen & paper gaming in 1992 with my newly purchased 2nd Ed. stuff. When I think of all of the gaming I've missed... well, best not to think of it I guess.

tesral
06-03-2008, 10:01 AM
One of my friends introduced me to D&D back in 1978... and I passed. Man, I can be so short-sighted at times. I finally got into pen & paper gaming in 1992 with my newly purchased 2nd Ed. stuff. When I think of all of the gaming I've missed... well, best not to think of it I guess.

There is always making up for lost time.

pkostrze
06-03-2008, 10:26 AM
There is always making up for lost time.

Too true, now all I have to do is find a group and some spare time.

tesral
06-03-2008, 10:50 AM
Too true, now all I have to do is find a group and some spare time.

Details, details.

I still have a spot open in my game. Dearborn, every other Saturday. Next game June 14.

Open gaming at Oakland University every Friday evening. I attend that as well.

Tamerath
06-03-2008, 12:26 PM
I was 12 when I swindled my parents to buy me the actual boxed set for forgotten realms after I read a lot of the novels that were out at that time. I didn't know they were part of the dungeons and dragons game. hehehe...of course after that I had to have all the ad&d stuff I could get my hands on.....although....I was a geeky young lad with hardly any friends at that time....I didn't actually get a gaming group together till I was almost 16 years old. Great group of people and good times all around.

tesral
06-03-2008, 05:11 PM
I was 12 when I swindled my parents to buy me the actual boxed set for forgotten realms after I read a lot of the novels that were out at that time. I didn't know they were part of the dungeons and dragons game. hehehe...of course after that I had to have all the ad&d stuff I could get my hands on.

That is coming in the back door.

Tamerath
06-04-2008, 02:29 AM
yeah no kidding right? lol

tesral
06-04-2008, 11:22 AM
yeah no kidding right? lol

No kidding. I got pulled into a TSR demo at MichiCon 3 back in 1976.

My friends and I had been role-playing for years. We just did not have a framework for it. When I brought D&D into the group they went nuts for it.

GoddessGood
06-10-2008, 10:31 AM
Got started at 12, free-form RPing in a homemade campaign setting ... Tolkien inspired, but what isn't, eh?

Schmall
06-10-2008, 11:00 AM
Before I even was able to read I enjoyed going through my Dad's AD&D MM. I loved looking at all the creatures and monsters. Then one stormy night with the power out, my dad introduced myseld and my two brothers to the game of D&D by candle light. I chose a dwarven fighter, middle bro took a halfling thief, youngest played a human cleric. Dad made sure we were balanced sine we knew absolutely nothing. When it came to rolling the dice, we rolled them up and he assigned the str for me, dex for the thief, and Wis for the cleric. From there he didnt tell us what did what but made us choose from there. Arc, the snoring, singing dwarven warrior is still my favorite and most remembered charecter of all time.

tesral
06-10-2008, 07:08 PM
Arc, the snoring, singing dwarven warrior is still my favorite and most remembered charecter of all time.

The fiest usual is. I still have the origional character sheet for Coran the Golden a centaur warrior. My first character. It's older than many players.

I joined a pick up game after the big demo thing, and since I had just bought a centaur figure I put that down as race.

cplmac
06-10-2008, 07:34 PM
Too true, now all I have to do is find a group and some spare time.


Details, details.

I still have a spot open in my game. Dearborn, every other Saturday. Next game June 14.

Open gaming at Oakland University every Friday evening. I attend that as well.


Oh how I envey you, pkostrze. It would be both an honor and a pleasure to get to play a character in tesral's game.

nijineko
06-14-2008, 10:08 PM
sweettalk him into doing something online and we all could attempt to join in. ^^ if he agreed, we would likely have to draw lots or use the dice roller to determine initiative order for who got first crack at sitting at his virtual table. ^^

jkfoote
06-16-2008, 12:08 AM
I thought it would be awkward and uncomfortable, but i was eased in and was accepted and fully embraced, felt the warmth and confidence grow as i got better and better, now i go for hours upon hours every weekend!!!

Arch Lich Thoth-Amon
06-24-2008, 09:45 PM
I was less than 8. My brother was 6. My friends and his boethers friends got toegether and figured it out and it was the best time ever. To this day, when speaking to these friends (over 30 years later), we laugh at the adventures we experienced. We talk like it happened just yesterday. Ah, good times.

Thoth-Amon

TotemChakra
06-24-2008, 10:19 PM
I mostly started when I was about 9 years old, looking for a new hobby. My sister was getting into painting (I got into drawing.. I win!) and my mother was always doing her beading and beach glass collection. So, I tried D&D! My mother was great with it at first, but hey, I got her to get me the starter set for 3.5 and that's when it all began!

trechriron
06-25-2008, 01:00 AM
It was 1981. I was sitting in the living room watching TV when suddenly a Toys R Us commercial came on. It was for the red box set of D&D.

The rest, they say, is history. :D

Mead
06-25-2008, 09:20 AM
The year was 1979, I was 5, my cousins needed a meatshield, and so it began.

tesral
06-25-2008, 10:44 AM
Some of you guys started young. Very young.

mrken
06-25-2008, 10:48 AM
Yeah, my son was four of five when he GM'd his first game for his friends. lol Where did that come from?

agoraderek
06-25-2008, 06:01 PM
Some of you guys started young. Very young.

nah, you were just born too early ;P

tesral
06-25-2008, 07:03 PM
nah, you were just born too early ;P

In that respect I suppose, but I got to stay home for school and watch John Glenn orbit the Earth.

agoraderek
06-25-2008, 07:17 PM
In that respect I suppose, but I got to stay home for school and watch John Glenn orbit the Earth.

well, yeah, there is that...

mrken
06-25-2008, 09:08 PM
Was thinking, I may still be too young to be doing this stuff. :lol:

tesral
06-25-2008, 11:03 PM
Was thinking, I may still be too young to be doing this stuff. :lol:

Then likely you are not too young. I started my son in at 12. That is when it first expressed an interest in the game. It had been played around him for his entire life, but never forced down his throat.

I'm too young to be this old, but hey....

agoraderek
06-26-2008, 12:19 AM
Then likely you are not too young. I started my son in at 12. That is when it first expressed an interest in the game. It had been played around him for his entire life, but never forced down his throat.

I'm too young to be this old, but hey....

why do i have frank sinatra running through my head right now?

kaibrightwing
06-26-2008, 06:53 PM
i started on battletech than rifts than D&D still on it and working on 4th and my macross game. after watching sme of the new macross frontier a spark has lit my creative writing more on my macross stories.

cplmac
06-28-2008, 02:58 PM
why do i have frank sinatra running through my head right now?


Because you obiviously enjoy good, "real" music.:violin::drum:

Igbutton
06-28-2008, 11:27 PM
My first D&D game was ran by my oldest brother. I was around 12 years old.

He borrowed it from a friend and my mother decided she had to play with us because she had heard all the "it satanic and will make you want to kill yourself" stuff.

I don't remember much about it really. I know we rolled stats and we couldn't assign where the went so it must have been 1E.

It started with all the pc's in a jail cell with a npc. A guard came and gave us some bread and the npc claimed it all for himself. I was able to con him out of some with my charisma score.

cplmac
06-29-2008, 10:06 AM
My first D&D game was ran by my oldest brother. I was around 12 years old.

He borrowed it from a friend and my mother decided she had to play with us because she had heard all the "it satanic and will make you want to kill yourself" stuff.

I don't remember much about it really. I know we rolled stats and we couldn't assign where the went so it must have been 1E.

It started with all the pc's in a jail cell with a npc. A guard came and gave us some bread and the npc claimed it all for himself. I was able to con him out of some with my charisma score.


It sounds like the only boxed set that I have. It came with a little plastic miniature for each PC and some paperboard tear outs for the different monsters you encountered.

Stormhound
07-03-2008, 05:41 PM
'79, 15 years old, a friend showed me the blue-box basic D&D set and I said something like "Hey, this looks cool, I bet it'd be fun making up a dungeon." And he said "Okay, we'll play it next week."

So my first time playing was my first time GMing.

tesral
07-03-2008, 06:46 PM
So my first time playing was my first time GMing.

I at least had two (short) session under my belt.

Webhead
07-03-2008, 07:04 PM
I at least had two (short) session under my belt.

I had something similar. Three or four "loose" role playing sessions with a friend...then trying to DM adventures for my brother with no rule books, a xeroxed copy of the Dark Sun Player's Guide given to me by a different friend and a single set of dice.

Things really took off a couple months later when I bought my first RPG book (the Star Wars Game Master Handbook) and began GMing a fantastic Star Wars campaign over the phone without real knowledge or even use of the "game rules". It's still one of my favorite role playing experiences.

Apocryphal Bushi
07-03-2008, 10:44 PM
It doesn't really count as roleplaying, but when I won a reading contest in like grade 4, the prize was The Forest of Doom by Ian Livingstone...

however, not too many years later my aunt bought me a copy of Steve Jackson and Ian Livingstone's Dungeoneer which was choose your own adventure with friends....the rest in history...

Stormhound
07-04-2008, 09:34 AM
I at least had two (short) session under my belt.

It was probably just as well in my case, as I took to GMing like a fish to water. Playing's okay and all, but it's so MUCH more fun getting to be a whole bunch of different monsters and NPCs, and trying to plan challenges that are just tough enough to make the players sweat, and coming up with interesting worlds and plots...

...and best of all is when the players thank you for putting them through hell.:biggrin:

praksis
07-07-2008, 03:18 PM
13 or 14 with a few goofy games of twighlight 2000 during lunch (yup, we were the geeks that hung out in the library at lunch...then again there wasn't much else to do really)
Though I'd have to say 15 was when I really started gaming. Met a friend who told me about this D&D thing, tried 2nd edition that weekend and have been gaming ever since, though nothing matches up with the experience of diving into something you know nothing about. How often do you see a ranger climb a tree to avoid being skewered by mounted orcs...granted it didn't take me long to figure out you can pretty much 1 shot orcs with an 18/00 strength (and I was wondering why the other players choked when I rolled that) Damn good times, and still fun 16 years later.

Bearfoot_Adam
07-08-2008, 10:36 AM
17 2nd ed dwarf fighter

purple42
07-10-2008, 07:07 PM
My ex-boyfriend was playing in a campaign when we first started dating. He introduced me to 2nd ed. D&D when I was 18 or 19. I didn't think I would play again when we broke up, so I gave him all my dice and books...stupid stupid stupid. Once the bug bites, you have caught it. I stopped playing for 2 years but now that I'm back into it, I'm hooked all over again...and I had to buy new dice.

kirksmithicus
07-11-2008, 07:56 PM
I started playing in 1980 with some friends at school. I got the red box basic set for Christmas and my family played it that day (three brothers, sister and mom!). It was rather funny to say the least. My oldest brother who was 19 at the time was the DM and killed me off because I was annoying him with what I later learned was called "rules lawyering". I've played ever since and so has my older brother who was the DM. My younger brother started playing in junior high and the three of us have had some family games from time to time.

Unlike some other people in this thread (and unlike my friends mother), my mother was very supportive of me playing D&D. When I asked her about it a few years ago she said, "if you can't tell the difference between a game and reality then you're just f'n stupid, and I didn't raise my kids to be f'n stupid" Good old mom!, she's always had a way with words. :eek: She also told me that my doctor recommended D&D as a way to help with my reading skills and dyslexia, that was, if I was interested in it. Boy was I ever!

Now days they just give you Ritalin.

jayphailey
07-11-2008, 08:21 PM
When I asked her about it a few years ago she said, "if you can't tell the difference between a game and reality then you're just f'n stupid, and I didn't raise my kids to be f'n stupid" Good old mom!, she's always had a way with words. :eek:


You go., Kirksmithicus's Mom!

Jay ~Meow!~

boulet
07-11-2008, 09:52 PM
Blessed be your mom and the good doctor. They had this kind of wisdom that seems rare these days.

tesral
07-12-2008, 02:29 AM
Blessed be your mom and the good doctor. They had this kind of wisdom that seems rare these days.

Amen Brother.

cplmac
07-12-2008, 05:16 PM
Blessed be your mom and the good doctor. They had this kind of wisdom that seems rare these days.

I definitely concure!


...Now days they just give you Ritalin.

Actually, all these people that have been in a rush to get the kids on Ritalin are going to be in for a surprise later on. My nephew has told us that they are finding that there are some long term effects that they are just recently coming to find from years of taking Ritalin. Some of the reactions that are surfacing are not very good, to include in some people it messes up the way they think.

boulet
07-12-2008, 07:33 PM
I don't pretend I know what it is to have a kid with ADD, but a prescription of a molecule which is commonly compared in its effects with amphetamines... huh no thanks ! I'd rather try and find another form of therapy.

agoraderek
07-14-2008, 06:30 PM
I don't pretend I know what it is to have a kid with ADD, but a prescription of a molecule which is commonly compared in its effects with amphetamines... huh no thanks ! I'd rather try and find another form of therapy.

i have ADD, no meds. i took a class, the premise of which was basically, there isnt anything WRONG with you, you just process differently. the problem as i see it is they try to shoehorn everyone into "linear" learning, whereas something like 30% of the population doesn't neccessarily think in a linear way.

and i agree, ritalin, adderol and other amphetamine-like drugs definitely have the potential to do more harm than good. plus, i think ADD is over diagnosed and doctors are too quick to go with a pharmecutical solution in the first place.

Stormhound
07-14-2008, 07:47 PM
the problem as i see it is they try to shoehorn everyone into "linear" learning, whereas something like 30% of the population doesn't neccessarily think in a linear way.

Whereas most of the remaining 70% can barely be bothered to think at all. :biggrin:

Arch Lich Thoth-Amon
07-14-2008, 07:55 PM
I started playing in 1980 with some friends at school. I got the red box basic set for Christmas and my family played it that day (three brothers, sister and mom!). It was rather funny to say the least. My oldest brother who was 19 at the time was the DM and killed me off because I was annoying him with what I later learned was called "rules lawyering". I've played ever since and so has my older brother who was the DM. My younger brother started playing in junior high and the three of us have had some family games from time to time.

Unlike some other people in this thread (and unlike my friends mother), my mother was very supportive of me playing D&D. When I asked her about it a few years ago she said, "if you can't tell the difference between a game and reality then you're just f'n stupid, and I didn't raise my kids to be f'n stupid" Good old mom!, she's always had a way with words. :eek: She also told me that my doctor recommended D&D as a way to help with my reading skills and dyslexia, that was, if I was interested in it. Boy was I ever!

Now days they just give you Ritalin.
Thats awesome. Thanks for posting.

Thoth-Amon

Engar
07-14-2008, 10:03 PM
Educators have come a long way in addressing varying learning styles and aptitudes in recent years. Not all teachers will embrace it and older teachers may not be educated in it themselves, but slowly and surely it will improve.

I see many parallels between pedagogy (art and science of teaching) and roleplaying techniques. Hooks are essential in both, engaging activities, higher level thinking is a huge parallel, etc.

Great story btw. Go mom!

tesral
07-14-2008, 11:42 PM
and i agree, ritalin, adderol and other amphetamine-like drugs definitely have the potential to do more harm than good. plus, i think ADD is over diagnosed and doctors are too quick to go with a pharmecutical solution in the first place.

Ayep. Much easier to stuff the kid with pills than deal with the kid.

I have heard theories that so called "ADD" was actually a survival trait to our hunter gatherer forbearers. The guy that was easily distracted was the first to notice the prey, or to to notice something wanted him as prey.

The Problem is not so called ADD, it is the environment that requires children to remain still and quiet when it is not their nature to remain still and quiet.

Engar
07-15-2008, 08:12 AM
The Problem is not so called ADD, it is the environment that requires children to remain still and quiet when it is not their nature to remain still and quiet.

Modern teaching methods would still require children to quietly sit still when called upon (necessary for a positive teaching environment and even safety). However, teachers are encouraged to use group work, create opportunities for kids to get up and move around and get involved. Straight lecturing has an abissmal retention rate for the majority of students. As soon as they start moving around and interacting (appropriately) that retention rate starts to double, triple, quintuple, or more.

Tomcat1066
07-15-2008, 08:36 AM
Continued hijack edited out. Sorry about that.

tesral
07-16-2008, 07:59 AM
Modern teaching methods would still require children to quietly sit still when called upon (necessary for a positive teaching environment and even safety). However, teachers are encouraged to use group work, create opportunities for kids to get up and move around and get involved. Straight lecturing has an abissmal retention rate for the majority of students. As soon as they start moving around and interacting (appropriately) that retention rate starts to double, triple, quintuple, or more.

Role-playing is good for ADD students as well. It improves math skills (Provided you play Twooy AD&D or GURPS), reading skills (Any system), paying attention (If you don't, you die), and social interaction.

The biggest advatage is it is something they want to do. People learn much faster when it is something they desire vs. something they are required to do, but don't care for.

Engar
07-16-2008, 05:18 PM
Role-playing is good for ADD students as well. It improves math skills (Provided you play Twooy AD&D or GURPS), reading skills (Any system), paying attention (If you don't, you die), and social interaction.

You are more than on to something! A major focus for educators today is higher learning. The lowest level of learning is knowledge (memorize, define, label), followed by comprehension (summarize, describe, recognize) and finally application (solve, use, operate). Higher learning involves analysis (interpret, compare, investigate), synthesis (compose, invent, predict) and finally evaluation (judge, infer, deduce).

Major questions that stimulate higher learning are "what if...?". Things like what if America had lost the Revolutionary War, what might America look like today? What if you poured oil in the gas tank of a diesel engine, what might happen? What if you lived in a far away magical land where monsters were real and only you and a few friends could change the world? See the correlation?

The benefits go WAY beyond, let me say that again, WAY BEYOND subject skills or social interactions. It is the core of teaching modern children to think individually and creatively. To use a Biblical reference it is equivalent to teaching a man to fish (higher level) vs. giving the man a fish (lower level).

Teaching higher level skills effectively negates the need to teach lower level skills. Example: if I assign "Little Red Riding Hood" as reading in elementary and then ask questions like, "What if Red had gotten to Grandmother's house before the wolf?" The student is forced to think creatively, but must still know the characters (knowledge), recognize the original story to know what might change (comprehension) and use what they know to create a reasonable deviation (application). And how important do you think a second grader feels being asked what they think?!!! Think they might remember (retain) that?


The biggest advatage is it is something they want to do. People learn much faster when it is something they desire vs. something they are required to do, but don't care for.

DEAD ON! A good teacher entertains with the information. A great teacher convinces kids to entertain them and each other with the information. They also retain much, much more. Retention rate (long term) for lectures is about 5%. Engaging individual or group activities involving higher learning start around 50% and spike near 100%! Most kids can remember a review long enough for the test tomorrow. Which is why some teachers are always confused when they pass all their tests and bomb the state exams. 5% retention does not cut it.

cplmac
07-16-2008, 06:47 PM
My kid brother is a teacher and he says that he is seeing some of his fellow teachers are starting to just primarily "teach" what is specifically on the state test that the students will be taking later in that school year. It really disgusts him that those so called educators are just worried about having a very high number of their students score well on the test. He also said that it is not just those teacher's, but that the school administration actually requires it of those particular teachers. Fortunately, there are currently only three times that the students take these tests.

More back towards the original topic. I can only hope that my daughters will have teachers that ask the right what if questions, to get them to think things through. In a way, I guess it might lead to the way of thinking when playing rpg's. Having to think things through and all.

nijineko
07-21-2008, 09:06 PM
i have ADD, no meds. i took a class, the premise of which was basically, there isnt anything WRONG with you, you just process differently. the problem as i see it is they try to shoehorn everyone into "linear" learning, whereas something like 30% of the population doesn't neccessarily think in a linear way.

and i agree, ritalin, adderol and other amphetamine-like drugs definitely have the potential to do more harm than good. plus, i think ADD is over diagnosed and doctors are too quick to go with a pharmecutical solution in the first place.

abso-frickin-lutely! ask any of my family or close friends and they will tell you that they don't know anyone who processes things more differently than i. i've been told that i have it, don't have it, seems to depend on which doc has read what article lately.... i refused to take any of the stimulant versions, and even the "safer, more natural" non-stimulant versions messed with my head. anything that gets classified with illegal narcotics is enough to make me say, 'no'.

i think very much in a geometric fashion, and remember things by indirect association, not by direct recall. great for plot threads as a gm, bad for remembering a schedule as a hubby. *^^*


You are more than on to something! A major focus for educators today is higher learning. The lowest level of learning is knowledge (memorize, define, label), followed by comprehension (summarize, describe, recognize) and finally application (solve, use, operate). Higher learning involves analysis (interpret, compare, investigate), synthesis (compose, invent, predict) and finally evaluation (judge, infer, deduce).... rest of awesomeness snipped for space reasons only!

awesome analysis! i want to print this out and frame it and hang it on one of the walls that the wife lets me put my stuff all over. ^^

tesral
07-21-2008, 09:50 PM
i think very much in a geometric fashion, and remember things by indirect association, not by direct recall. great for plot threads as a gm, bad for remembering a schedule as a hubby.

I believe this a common thing among the creative types that tend to GM or write or any such activity.

agoraderek
07-22-2008, 09:45 PM
I believe this a common thing among the creative types that tend to GM or write or any such activity.

this goes with a theory i have. i find that a lot of literature, music, film, just about anything "artistic" is less and less creative, and more derivative, as time goes by. my theroy is, a lot of creative people have the "mojo" doped right out of them..

i wonder how many of the great creative minds of the past would have been effectively silenced had they had ritalin to calm them down when they were acting up as children...

Tomcat1066
07-23-2008, 05:00 AM
I was a Ritalin kid and it didn't remove my creativity at all. Not while I was on it or afterwards. All it did was help me focus on class a little bit better. I have tons of random thoughts pop into my head on a daily basis with such force that it's hard not to act on some of them. In school, the Ritalin helped. Unfortunately, it stopped helping in high school which is when I had to figure something out myself.

To bad so many people are diagnosed with ADD/ADHD when really their parents just don't discipline them at all. It makes it harder for people to give a damn that some of us really do have something like this.

tesral
07-23-2008, 06:20 AM
this goes with a theory i have. i find that a lot of literature, music, film, just about anything "artistic" is less and less creative, and more derivative, as time goes by. my theroy is, a lot of creative people have the "mojo" doped right out of them..

i wonder how many of the great creative minds of the past would have been effectively silenced had they had ritalin to calm them down when they were acting up as children...

I think you are correct at least in part. However you find edgy and creative things on the fringes of the money. Money is afraid, it doesn't like the edge. That is why movies seldom get there. It takes lots of money. Ritalin and Prozac rob you of part of you. Mental castration. The most creative minds are often the ones the most over the edge of the sheep like state called "normal". True genius and insanity dance hand in hand. Albert Einstein, Thomas Edison, Rudyard Kipling, all three of these true geniuses had abnormal even difficult childhoods. What would we be missing if they have been drugged into "normal".

The problem isn't the child, the problem is the system that straitjackets the child. Not to say there are not a few genuine brats out there. But I truly believe the majority of behavioral drugs given to children are for the convenience of adults without regard to what the drugs are doing to the child.

coffeedragon
07-31-2008, 03:22 AM
I was 13 and had just arrived at boarding school in 1986 when I saw my first D&D book (original monster manual). The older kids were playing and wouldn't even let me have a good look at the book :(
It would be another 3 years before I got to play and then it was Basic D&D - the red box set. Good times...

Dunchad
07-31-2008, 04:14 PM
I started when I was 10 years old. My favorite Uncle bought me the core books of if AD&D in 1980 for my birthday. MY best friend had just gotten Basic D&D and we were starting to look at it since winter was setting in and it was going to be a rough one in Colorado that year. So I got the AD&D books and 2 sets of dice with crayons. I still have the dice and the books, but alas the crayons have long since departed.

I still play to this day, even run my own games in the 3.5 system. I have an entire world that I have built and cultivated over the years. And to add to the above conversation, when I was in high school one of my best friends had a ADD and such. He got into D&D with us and had a great time.

I can remember walking past his math room one day and his teacher was telling him he was an idiot because he could do the math. I walked in and looked at the problem and figured it real quick. I stepped over to me friend and reworded into D&D terms. Guess what, he answered the question before anyone else in the class did and he got it right too. From that point forward we re-did all his math into D&D terms and such and he not only aced the class but got recognized by the teacher for making such headway that he was not an idiot and should never have been called one in a moment of frustration.

Some teachers are open to trying new things, but unfortunately the older teachers want to stick to their guns and never waiver. I am glad that that math teacher changed his mind and made a difference for my friend.

bltzkrg242
08-03-2008, 12:03 PM
I was 5 when my brother brought home the original D&D basic bkue box set.
We played that same adventure so many times we could run it in one night easy

Chi
04-04-2009, 01:21 PM
Sorry just found this thread. I was almost done with high school and an ex of mine was a dm so I played with his game d and d, I hated it couldn't figure out why people like that kind of stuff. Started again over the past two years and love it.

Mindbomb
04-04-2009, 08:27 PM
I was 14 and made a new friend with an AD&D PH and MM. We made our characters on regular lined paper and invented every magic item we used. It was a blast.

Envikin
04-04-2009, 09:49 PM
I was twelve when a friend brought the AD&D players handbook on a Boy Scout camp out. One of the adult leaders came over to be sure we were not learning anything about devils or Satan. She actually ended up participating in our first game briefly.

Etarnon
04-04-2009, 11:26 PM
I was running Classic Traveller at age 11, in 1977.

Arch Lich Thoth-Amon
04-04-2009, 11:45 PM
I was running Classic Traveller at age 11, in 1977.
Same here, Etarnon. Ah, the good times. I still have my original Traveller material. Now, i'm grabbing up the new MT material. All good stuff.

GoddessGood
04-06-2009, 08:58 AM
I'm adding Traveller to the list of games I must try. It's sitting there next to Champions, Amber Diceless, and MERP

Kaewin
04-06-2009, 09:08 AM
I started palying when I was 12, way back in '82 but my brother used to play it when it first came out and I used to read his stuff. He played up in Lake Geneva a couple of times with Gary himself, of course as I understand it he loved to kill of playing characters......um I mean teach a new player the game.

MuslixtheMighty
07-20-2009, 03:10 PM
I was somewhere between the ages of 6 to 8 when my oldest brother started playing D&D and introduced it to all of his younger brothers.

tesral
07-20-2009, 03:55 PM
I was somewhere between the ages of 6 to 8 when my oldest brother started playing D&D and introduced it to all of his younger brothers.

Someone has a new avatar.

Arch Lich Thoth-Amon
07-20-2009, 04:20 PM
I was somewhere between the ages of 6 to 8 when my oldest brother started playing D&D and introduced it to all of his younger brothers.
Cool Avatar, btw.

Btw, i started playing in or around 1975.

Arkhemedes
07-20-2009, 04:57 PM
btw - that stands for 'back the whitey' right?



No? Oh well. Anyway, I'm sad to report that for my age I'm a late comer. I didn't start playing until '88 after I graduated from college. But I've been making up for it ever since! :biggrin:

Arch Lich Thoth-Amon
07-20-2009, 05:58 PM
To a Lich, race means nothing.

tesral
07-20-2009, 07:08 PM
To a Lich, race means nothing.

Race is so relative. Color stops being an issue when the other guy has a beak.

Baldwin Stonewood
07-20-2009, 07:54 PM
I believe I was 11, possibly 12, at the time.

Jmkeylon
07-20-2009, 09:15 PM
I'm twenty two, still looking to join my first real campaign but I have been addicted to the IDEA of DnD since I was 10 years old (when My mom said that DnD stole your soul and that a bunch of methed up gamers ran around and killed people with swords in the 80s)

MuslixtheMighty
07-21-2009, 12:09 AM
Someone has a new avatar.

Cool Avatar, btw.

Thanks for noticing, even though it is hard not to. While looking around for a new desktop wallpaper, I decided to see if I could find a new avatar and TADA!

templeorder
07-21-2009, 12:15 AM
I guess it was around 12 or so... Rick and Geln were the first people i gamed with, but it was Andy and Harold that introduced me to the idea at recess. I went down to Loehmans Plaza and got my first dice without knowing what polyhedron meant. So young, so foolish... little did i know those dice would be the gateway drug.
--- Merged from Double Post ---

I'm twenty two, still looking to join my first real campaign but I have been addicted to the IDEA of DnD since I was 10 years old (when My mom said that DnD stole your soul and that a bunch of methed up gamers ran around and killed people with swords in the 80s)

My god!!!! Get this poor soul into a gaming group!!!!!

traesin
07-21-2009, 08:57 AM
As a female gamer I was NOT interduced to the game by my boyfriend.....I was 16 (91). I actually had a bunch of 2es books and stuff and me and a friend were trying to figure it out on our own. THEN my boyfriend found out and ran me through me 1st session. Mom didn't finds out for a year...then I was in a car accident on my way to a game.....She was NOT happy......

Oldgamer
07-21-2009, 02:37 PM
I was 10 and just moved into a new neighborhood. One of the first kids I made friends with told me about it, and I had already liked the genre, being introduced by 3 movies at least (Excalibur, Conan the Barbarian, & Beastmaster), I was sucked right in. We had a weekly game that rotated houses that we called the D&D Club (real imaginative right?). I would have it one week, then someone else, then someone else, etc. Whoever hosted bought all the snacks. We played for almost 4 years with the same people before High School hit and the social ladder had been adjusted and some of the people who were "nerds" in Middle School were now not so nerdy and wouldn't hang out with the rest of us, then I moved. But everywhere I went, I found a new D&D crowd, through high school and into the military, then out and I still find players and DMs anywhere I go it seems.

Bob the Dalek
07-21-2009, 02:39 PM
I was 9 and my DM was 12.

kkriegg
07-22-2009, 02:39 AM
I think I was about 9 when a friend of mine introduced me to a sort of "free form" roleplaying. One person was the GM and the other was the player. All decisions were made by the GM based on awesomeness. It got pretty strange sometimes.

Then when I was about 11, I started playing Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and Heroes Unlimited. That was my first "proper" RPG.

Law
05-24-2010, 06:20 PM
First time: about 5 years ago, right around my 20th birthday.

jade von delioch
05-25-2010, 01:19 AM
I think thats a little too personal of.....

oh, you meaning gaming..

16-17 i think.

tesral
05-25-2010, 02:07 AM
Usually, get you mind out of that gutter.

Law
05-25-2010, 12:42 PM
First time: about 5 years ago, right around my 20th birthday.

Wait . . . we were talking about gaming?!?

:redface:

Valar
08-27-2010, 08:18 AM
I was 15 I think, 3E Chainmail... many, many, years ago.