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MelodyMan123
11-08-2007, 10:21 PM
Hiya, im new obviously, and ive never played a pen and paper rpg. anyone want to fill me in a little on any fun and affordable expansive ones, similar to classic d n d? Sorry, i dont really have a background to tell. just a 18 yr old kid looking for some fun stuff to do at home.

Moritz
11-09-2007, 08:36 AM
MelodyMan

Not even sure where to start with such a question or request. There's nothing like Classic D&D. Not even Classic D&D is like Classic D&D. It was magical, mysterious, and a love affair like no other. You may wanna take advantage of your youth and start working on the development of a time machine so you can go way back and check out what it was like back in the day.

Welcome aboard, have fun. jump on the boards and find what you're looking for.

PhishStyx
11-09-2007, 10:31 AM
Mostly, having a good game depends on you and your friends making it one, no matter what the style is or the rules are.

We each have our favorites though. Personally, I don't like the current D&D stuff much at all, and there are tons of games that I think do the same job but better.

MelodyMan123
11-09-2007, 04:04 PM
by classic d&d i meant not eberron or any of the branches off. i should have been more clear. anywho, i found someone who is helping me through this site, so im looking pretty good right now.

Skunkape
11-13-2007, 09:12 AM
You should have lots of fun as you start out on the road of gaming! All of this is still new to you no matter what games you start playing! Yes, having lots of experience playing the different games is important, but there's nothing quite like the first few years you game!

Biggest piece of advice I can give you is to make sure you and the other people you're playing with are having fun! That's the whole point of the hobby! A good group that wants to have fun together makes the game, more so than the system!

Good luck and enjoy!

Digital Arcanist
11-21-2007, 09:33 PM
Well I play everything out there regularly and I have feelings about each of the different settings but I won't color your perceptions with my opinions.

As a new player I will offer these three pieces of advice:

1. Procure only the core rules in the beginning and familiarize yourself with the combat and skills sections of each. These will be the most used sections and the ones to really drag a game down.

2. Memorizing the rules is great but be prepared for house rules or table rules. Each DM/group will have a couple peculiar rules or modifications they like to use. Moritz has like 50 pages of them so don't play with him. He's highstrung and not pretty enough to put up with it.

3. As a beginner, try to find a group whose goal is to educate beginners. If you can't manage that then be prepared for snobbery from experienced players. We can be real booger-heads, as my kids like to say, when it comes to n00bs.

Like Moritz said earlier, D&D and role-playing in general is magical (in a fantasy setting) or technologically superior (in a modern setting) to any sort of entertainment you may have partaken in to date.

Skunkape
11-22-2007, 04:03 PM
Well I play everything out there regularly and I have feelings about each of the different settings but I won't color your perceptions with my opinions.

As a new player I will offer these two pieces of advice:

1. Procure only the core rules in the beginning and familiarize yourself with the combat and skills sections of each. These will be the most used sections and the ones to really drag a game down.

2. Memorizing the rules is great but be prepared for house rules or table rules. Each DM/group will have a couple peculiar rules or modifications they like to use. Moritz has like 50 pages of them so don't play with him. He's highstrung and not pretty enough to put up with it.

3. As a beginner, try to find a group whose goal is to educate beginners. If you can't manage that then be prepared for snobbery from experienced players. We can be real booger-heads, as my kids like to say, when it comes to n00bs.

Like Moritz said earlier, D&D and role-playing in general is magical (in a fantasy setting) or technologically superior (in a modern setting) to any sort of entertainment you may have partaken in to date.

Digital Arcanist makes some really good points as far as the books and such are concerned. Also, if you are going to do something that's defined by said rules, make sure you have an idea of what the effects are in the game. If you're not sure, open your book to that area prior to making that choice.

A good example, let's say you're playing a wizard in a fantasy game and you're going to cast a spell. Turn to the page that explains the spell and if you have time, scan it once more before your turn. That way, you'll have whatever effects of the spell available to you when the time comes. Most game masters don't remember every minor aspect of the game, so having that available for the GM to make a ruling on/roll against is important to the flow of the game.

Also, knowing what your character is capable of during the game can be important for you to make decisions as to what you want to do!

Digital Arcanist
11-22-2007, 06:55 PM
To build upon Skunkape's example, I assemble a spell book that contains print-outs or a word document with the pasted-in excerpts of the spells I know. I've had a DM give me an entire level's worth of XP for the amount of work I put into the book and the updates I added continually.

I also photocopy the class section out the book to keep with me instead of dragging the entire book along. If the class you choose has some new set of rules accompanying it then xerox those as well for yourself and the DM. They like that sort of thing.