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Farcaster
09-20-2006, 12:02 AM
Of the most popular campaign settings for Dungeons & Dragons out there, which is your favorite?

Inviktus
09-20-2006, 01:21 AM
Scarred Lands of course. ;)

bento
09-21-2006, 03:30 PM
Kara-Tur (original Oriental Adventures). GMing it now with a group of five players.

Darkhorse810
09-25-2006, 02:03 PM
Forgotten Realms 4 sure!

Farcaster
09-25-2006, 02:09 PM
Forgotten Realms 4 sure!

I am 100% with you. I have been running campaigns in Forgotten Realms since 2nd edition. It is by far my favorite gaming world. I recently sat in on a few games with a group that was playing in Eberron and I just couldn't get into it. Whenever some bit of political intrigue would come up, or something about the various house dynamics, my eyes would just glaze over. It just didn't click with me.

But, I love the richness of the Forgotten Realms setting. I wish D&D Online had gone the FR route instead of switching to Eberron mid-design. I would have LOVED to have experienced Waterdeep in a MMPOG.

C.W.Richeson
09-25-2006, 03:30 PM
Eberron isn't an AD&D setting. It's a D&D 3.5 setting.

Farcaster
09-25-2006, 07:08 PM
Hmm.. I guess technically that's right. I think of anything after the 5-box Dungeons and Dragons set that I first owned as Advanced Dungeons and Dragons -- from 1st edition on.

Speaking of which? Does anyone actually still have those boxed sets? It'd be cool to look through those again, and reminisce about the days when Elf was a class :)

Masonictemplar
09-27-2006, 11:44 AM
Rokugan! Oriental Adventures... the best place ever!

Lesuit
09-27-2006, 01:12 PM
Midwrathe setting, followed closely by Five Worlds and The Great River. These are all 3.5e shared settings played in the PNW.

Grimwell
09-28-2006, 09:33 AM
Birthright -- the most under valued setting ever produced by TSR. Great world, screams adventure. Still have and use it obsessively.

For 3.5 I'm running the Blackmoor MMRPG and am finding that I really like the setting as I dig into it. Great feel, great world, lots of adventure options. Reminds me of how I felt when I first got into Birthright. The world just 'fits' me.

KCrider
09-28-2006, 12:56 PM
...I'll bet you can guess my favorite campaign setting :cool:

Thanks,

Kyle

Skunkape
09-28-2006, 04:48 PM
I'll play anything, but as far as running is concerned, I always do home brew. Have only been doing home brew for around 15 years or so.

CAD
09-30-2006, 06:45 AM
Mystara by far, particularly the Known World. The Gazetter series not only attended to the mundane details of each country: history, people, movers and shakers; but they were full of plot twists (snippets of information for the DM to build upon. Intrigue was the aim of the authors, and the more ways to keep the players guessing about the outcomes of their actions the better! Yeah, you can become a ruler, but there are those out there that want your job! In my opinion, that's when the fun really begins.

CAD

Farcaster
10-08-2006, 01:43 AM
I'm curious. Has anyone tried Ptolus? This writeup over at White Wolf (http://secure1.white-wolf.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=686)builds it up quite a bit. But, at $120, it would have to be absolutely spectacular for me to throw down the cash on a single book.

spotlight
10-08-2006, 02:17 PM
I have never acctually enjoyed any of the set worlds, per sae. Most of the settings I have played were home brewed, or at least heavily modified versions. In fact, I have two favorite worlds which I use in the fantacy games I occasionally get to run. They are definatly homebrewed.

Nerve Gas
10-12-2006, 03:05 PM
Forgotten Realms is my favorite, espcially since there are so many books written in it. Also, it tends to have the most memorable characters and gods. Have played in Ptolus and bought the book for $60ish dollars. You can find it brand new online for around that. So far it is pretty cool, but have not read much about it yet.

Yoshiro
10-13-2006, 05:43 AM
Home Brew make for great active campaigns because it opens doors for all levels while some of the other settings lack the creativity that this type offers. but if i had to choose i'd go forgotten realms just because its the least complicated next to oriental, eberron and a few others to learn and delve into... :p

tsmith96
10-14-2006, 12:51 PM
my favorite campaign is . . . .tomb of horrors it really kicks ass

Shield
10-14-2006, 04:10 PM
I write homebrew.

I'm in Honors Language Arts in my high school so I guess naturally I should write good campaigns. :-)

Alithian the Archmage
10-17-2006, 04:05 PM
Forgotten Realms definiently. It's extremely developed, both world-wise and the epic and original characters. I'm also pulled over towards it over others because of the complexity an detail of the Underdark (plus the Drow are freakin awesome) and Elminster: you gotta love 'im.:)

Farcaster
10-17-2006, 04:13 PM
the Drow are freakin awesome)

I'm guessing that you might be a Salvatore fan, then?

DrakanFyre
10-17-2006, 08:52 PM
Since no one else is going to, it then falls to me to give Eberron some love.

I love the idea of magic being industrialized and used to benefit the masses; the intrigue between the nations, houses, even continents; the looser interpretations on alignments on a personal and racial level; the unitarian nature of religion and the layout of the planes...

I love how you can play an orc, drow, minotaur, or lizardfolk without having to justify it; I love how the medusa or mind flayer can be an ally as easily as an enemy, and how the same goes for a gold dragon; I love the aura of pulp adventure and exploration, as well as the sense of impending destiny or cataclysm.


Another campaign setting I like, even though I never played in it, was Planescape. I started D&D at 3rd Edition, so I never got an oppurtunity to play it, but I'm glad they decided to merge it into the core setting.

Also, being a World of Warcraft groupie, I'm really digging Arthaus' d20 version of the setting, and am anxious to find a group to play it.

Rokugan and Arcana Unearthed are also intriguing settings; its a shame I've never been able to play more than a single session of either.

TheSmartestLemming
10-19-2006, 05:37 PM
I agree with Spotlight, I've never really enjoyed campaign settings all that much. Home brewed ftw, well as long as you actually stick to one homebrewed world for long ammounts of time. :cool:

jwbucs99
10-25-2006, 02:22 PM
I agree with Nerve Gas & Alithian the Archmage that the forgotten Realms is the most well rounded and balanced game world that I have been exposed to. The Realms have been around for a while and there is so much material available to choose from. It has a multitude of memorable characters and gods that has kept it interesting all this time. Some of the new game worlds have not been time tested and still have some kinks to work out. Even the Realms had to be tweeked a few times in the early years to get to where it is today.

RAMBOWOLF
10-29-2006, 08:07 AM
I love Forgotten Realms always have. they have a nice truck load of stuff for it.

technophile
10-29-2006, 10:56 PM
I like homebrews, as long as the DM is inventive and has the (massive amount of free) time to put into it. Something about exploring new worlds appeals to me, plus it tends to cut down on people's common desire to interact with (or play as --shudder--) "famous" people in well-known worlds. Meeting Elminster or Drizzt Do'Urden, for example. :-P

I should add that the coolest for-sale setting I ever read and never got to play was the Council of Wyrms (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Council_of_Wyrms) setting. I mean, what's not to love about playing a bronze dragon from birth? :D

RealmsDM
11-13-2006, 11:47 PM
Although my last 3, and soon to begin 4th campaign were all Forgotten Realms, and I do think that its great, Greyhawk holds a special place for me (and should for every D&D player)
Tomb of Horrors, Against the Giants, Vault of the Drow, Scorge of the Slavelords, Lost Caverns of Tsojcanth, Descent into the Depths of the Earth, White Plume Mountain... I could go on & on. Greyhawk produced some of the greatest best D&D material to date.
I'll continue to play in the Realms simply because of the product support it gets. Although I must say I'm quite sick of several aspects of FR:
- the fanboys who quote obscure Ed Greenwood posts & messages when trying to prove a gaming point. Ed was & is a writer, but as far as game design, I think he's horrible. That's why the realms was his little private world until Gygax co-created D&D.
- the list of game designers in WotC products has shrunk to a small club akin to a secret society. Not that they're bad, but the immagination gene pool has gotten dangerously shallow of late. Fresh minds, not crazy supplements & rule changes make the game better. That's what ruined 2nd edition... to much crap.

CAD
12-06-2006, 09:57 AM
Hmm.. I guess technically that's right. I think of anything after the 5-box Dungeons and Dragons set that I first owned as Advanced Dungeons and Dragons -- from 1st edition on.

Speaking of which? Does anyone actually still have those boxed sets? It'd be cool to look through those again, and reminisce about the days when Elf was a class :)

Even those five boxed (basic, expert, master, companion & immortal) sets were published after 1st Edition. If you really want to go back you'd have to open the boxed sets like Eldritch Sorcery, etc. I have a friend that just sold his second printing of the original game for $1,000 on e-bay, so unless you have a lot of disposable income don't get your hopes up. As for the five boxed sets published under the Dungeons & Dragons heading they were set in the World of Mystara (Known World-Gazetteers, Hollow World, Savage Baroinies, etc.) along with a wealth of modules too!

CAD
12-06-2006, 10:07 AM
- the list of game designers in WotC products has shrunk to a small club akin to a secret society. Not that they're bad, but the immagination gene pool has gotten dangerously shallow of late. Fresh minds, not crazy supplements & rule changes make the game better. That's what ruined 2nd edition... to much crap.

That's what happens when you have accountants determining what will be developed instead of gamers! Sell, sell, sell! At some point, people will stop buying the garbage and create their own material, unfortunately though it kills to many enthusiasts along the way.

Farcaster
12-06-2006, 10:12 AM
The Advanced Dungeons and Dragons rulebooks originally released in 1977 are commonly referred to as 1st edition, just to make sure we're on the same page. Of course, I wasn't quite playing yet at that point, I was too busy trying to figure out the whole walking and talking thing. *chuckle*

A thousand smackers though? That is an impressive sum, and even more impressive to have an intact rulebook after all that time. My RPG books tend to have a life span of about three to four years before I completely tear them up. With WotC around to put out new editions around every corner, though, I don't have to worry about replacing my current copies, I just have to buy the new versions! :rolleyes: I do have a couple of the 1st and 2nd edition books left and relatively intact, but a lot of my old roleplaying books were damaged about a year back when a water pipe burst in my house, flooding the place. :(

Skunkape
12-06-2006, 11:50 AM
I have most if not all of the books from the little white box! Granted the box isn't in really good shape, the books are in very good shape. I need to take some snaps of them and post 'em so you guys can drool!:D

Oh and I think I've got the 1st edition book somewhere too, but I'm not sure how good a condition that one is in, at least good shape though. Think I've got the Melee book still also.

But 1 grand is a nice sum to get for that!

gurusloth
01-17-2007, 03:20 AM
I'm curious. Has anyone tried Ptolus?I read the comic books. Does that count?

Both Ptolus and the World's Largest City seem like they could be quite awesome, though, and you could drop them into just about any setting if you wanted to.

Zijaerdran
01-24-2007, 10:44 PM
Hmm.. I guess technically that's right. I think of anything after the 5-box Dungeons and Dragons set that I first owned as Advanced Dungeons and Dragons -- from 1st edition on.

Speaking of which? Does anyone actually still have those boxed sets? It'd be cool to look through those again, and reminisce about the days when Elf was a class :)

I had the Basic Set D&D in 1980. It was the first RPG experience it'd had at the time and I've been hooked ever since. Unfortunately, it was lost to adolescent negligence (sp). I was, however able to get a hold of a Silver Anniversary box set later on that had the original D&D booklet, and several modules (Keep on the Borderlands, Against the Giants Trilogy, Ravenloft and Tomb of Horrors) in their original print format (though not original print copies themselves) along with a few replications of artwork from early publications.

Every now and then I get them out an look over them in misty nostalgia.

Cheers,
Z

By the way I have been known to refer to the 3.0 and 3.5 editions as AD&D even though they don't technically fall within that category. Ah well.

Zijaerdran
01-24-2007, 10:49 PM
...Oh, Forgotten Realms is my favorite setting. Though I would have to call Greyhawk a close second.

Farcaster
01-30-2007, 11:01 AM
Considering how hard WotC has pushed and committed to the Eberron project, there are surprisingly few people from this (albeit limited) poll who actually prefer that setting.

Gethsemane
01-30-2007, 05:42 PM
I have had very limited exposure to Eberron. From what little I'm going off of, though, it seems to incorporate fantaasy elements that I'd classify as 'mechanised'. Maybe that's a turn off for people. I remember that Forgotten realms startd to loose it's appeal for my group when gunpowder started showing up. What was that stuff called... crud. Flashpowder? No...

Farcaster
01-30-2007, 05:49 PM
I have only played Eberron a few times, but from what I've read and what I experienced playing DDO, it strikes me as more as the lost world of Atlantis type feel, as far as the technology level goes. My problem was more trying to get interested in the political and historical dynamics.

gdmcbride
02-02-2007, 05:02 AM
I like Eberron okay. I've read almost all the books and though they vary in quality from the excellent (Sharn : City of Towers) to the merely mediocre (Faiths of Eberron, Five Nations), the world is fairly interesting.

What Eberron lacks is the definitive Eberron Campaign. Greyhawk is to Temple of Elemental Evil/Slavers/Demon Queen of Spiders as Eberron is to .... nothing.

WotC needs to get on that in my humble opinion.

But my favorite D&D world ... Midnight. No doubt about it.

“I have traded everything I’ve had or known, power and place, friend and family, blood and bone, for this failing dream – that this shall not be our world’s last age…”

Gary

TwoGunBob
02-02-2007, 08:26 AM
I'm partial to Ravenloft. From the time of the first module I was pretty estatic about it becoming a full blown campaign world. Although I wasn't too hip to the transportation by mists and preferred to have Realm born characters casue there was no escape, only survival.

Zijaerdran
02-03-2007, 12:27 AM
Greyhawk is a favorite of mine due to the amount of time I have spent playing in the realm. It's versatility was a boon for the DM I played with in my younger days, when most other people were raving about Forgotten Realms. When I came into my own as a DM, I chose Greyhawk due to my familiarity to the setting. Recently I have been spending alot of time playing catch-up with the R. A. Salvatore and Ed Greenwood novels and their work has inspired me to read on through the Harpers series, as well. I've run a few campaigns in forgotten realms and my knowledge of its history has enabled me to enrich my games with intuitive NPC's and historical backgrounds that give my campaigns a more 3-dimensional feel.

ghost_runner
02-05-2007, 07:32 PM
I love the realms, the drop-in or cameo appearances of Elminster or Drizzt are nice for gamers that have read into those. For new players, or for less politically minded, I have to be the first to toss lance up as a good spot to play in. I love the paladine character (ok, so he's more fizban when I use him) and having him pop into other realms for a visit just might be somthing that ol' misfit just might do, and then forget why he did.

rabkala
02-06-2007, 11:36 PM
I have never acctually enjoyed any of the settings as a DM. As a player I liked most of them to an extent. Most of the settings I have played in were heavily modified versions, though. As a DM, I need more room than I feel I have with a heavily written world like FR or DL.

Farcaster
02-06-2007, 11:46 PM
I almost exclusively run my games in Forgotten Realms. I love having the backdrop of existing plot lines and characters, but I always feel at liberty to pick and choose what details I want to keep and what details I toss. So, I'm probably pretty much in the same boat, in that my version of FR is a modified mock of the original.

QumullusTheNimblest
04-01-2007, 11:54 PM
Mystara!? Blech. Okay, i'll eat those words right now as I answer the question myself... Um, okay... (blushes) I'm with Grimwell - Birthright.
Wait! Don't hang up on me yet! We don't use the dumb card-system for big battles, etc, in fact, we really don't even use the Domain Ruler rules. We just use the world to play in. Great ploitics, great maps, cool Big Baddies. I guess it's a Birthright "setting"-homebrew-hybrid.

Our new DM runs Eberron, it's getting kind of interesting, too.

I'd give Rokugan props, too, we had a terrific Rokugan campaign a few years ago that sadly died off, but everyone still talks about - and THAT'S what good gaming's all about!

I think if you have an open-minded gaming group, who have fun playing the game together, any setting gets charged with the group's energy and becomes memorable. Well, okay, maybe not Spelljammer... (sorry, Hamsters).

gdmcbride
04-02-2007, 01:49 AM
I think if you have an open-minded gaming group, who have fun playing the game together, any setting gets charged with the group's energy and becomes memorable.

This is of course the sort of unwritten but universal response to the question. What is the 'best' game setting? Why the one you enjoy the most with your particular gaming group. If that's Forgotten Realms, a grim and gritty home-brew or Mr. Wiggles Goes to Smurfland, it matters not. It's all personal taste.

But...that answer is kind of boring. The intent of the question seems to be, which of the D&D settings do you feel has the most merit and is most likely to create a memorable campaign. This too is an unsolvable and very personal value-laden question, but at least it keeps the boards a-hopping.

And by the way, I can't believe we're this far into this discussion and noone has mentioned Monte Cook's "Ptolus". Ptolus rules.

Gary

Farcaster
04-09-2007, 10:02 PM
Monte Cook's "Ptolus". Ptolus rules.


I've wanted to try it, but I'm deeply into a campaign set in Forgotten Realms right now -- well, actually, all the action is happening in the Planes, not FR, really. Perhaps after this campaign runs its course, I'll give it a try.

PhishStyx
04-09-2007, 11:59 PM
What's odd is that in 26 years of gaming (I started with the Basic red box in '81), I've never bought a single D&D setting book nor played more than a single game session in a D&D campaign set in a published setting.

gdmcbride
04-10-2007, 12:26 AM
I've wanted to try it, but I'm deeply into a campaign set in Forgotten Realms right now -- well, actually, all the action is happening in the Planes, not FR, really. Perhaps after this campaign runs its course, I'll give it a try.

I cannot recommend Ptolus enough to anyone with even a casual interest in fantasy RPGs. It retails for $120 and it is worth every penny (though you can get it at a substantial discount). It sets a new bar for editing and indexing in an RPG book and the content is simply stellar. As soon as I read it, I knew I was going to run it.

My recommendation, get together a group, pool the money and give it still sealed to your preferred GM. Play Ptolus. You won't be disappointed.

In 2006, I bought more than a hundred RPG books and Ptolus was, easily, the second best of the lot and by a wide margin the best d20.

Gary

gdmcbride
04-10-2007, 12:37 AM
What's odd is that in 26 years of gaming (I started with the Basic red box in '81), I've never bought a single D&D setting book nor played more than a single game session in a D&D campaign set in a published setting.

Whoa. That's ... that's amazing. You, sir, might be the most stalwart home-brewer I've ever met.

I enjoy a good homebrew ... don't get me wrong. I ran a homebrew world in college that lasted five years. But I think the homebrew world builder can learn a lot by looking at what others have wrought before you. For example I am so very glad that I read the Al-Qadim main book, Sharn: City of Towers, Ptolus, Shackled City, Nyambe, A Magical Medieval Society: Western Europe, Silk Road, the original Ravenloft, almost everything written for Midnight ... I could go on. These are great books and I think that they've made me both a better GM and a better creator of campaigns.

Gary

PhishStyx
04-10-2007, 01:25 AM
Whoa. That's ... that's amazing. You, sir, might be the most stalwart home-brewer I've ever met.

Gary

Well sort of, I admit that I "cheated" a little. I don't have any problem buying setting books, but I neglected to mention that I haven't bought never did buy into AD&D, 2nd edition and haven't bought any 3rd edition books either.

The reason I rarely get to play campaign games is that in all that time, I've only played in about 10 long-term campaigns total (that is to say, games lasting longer than 6 months), not just D&D-style fantasy, but everything, every game I've ever played!

On the other hand, I am writing a fantasy setting for use with my personal favorite game system (PFGS).

Digital Arcanist
04-10-2007, 09:56 AM
I'm currently playing in a Ptolus campaign Farcaster. I'm an engineer and occult studies graduate in real life so for a campaign setting to combine technology and chaos magic in a fantasy setting was really attractive to me.

I'm playing a Grailwarden dwarf cleric who specializes in making magically powered firearms. My GM modified the Iron God template and renamed it the Metal God so I could have access to the new materials in the setting. I am now Van Halen, priest of the Metal God. The table chuckles every time I introduce myself.

I like the fact that Monte Cook went against some of the cliches when designing the races, Grailwarden dwarves for example. My dwarf is cultured, clean and doesn't exactly enjoy tavern brawls. He does still possess the traditional dwarven traits like bonuses to checks involving stonework and crafting checks.

Everyone should give the setting a try. Just don't try and compare it to FR, because most things will come up lacking when compared to FR.

I also agree with Lemming in that home brew settings have given me the most enjoyment but I have also experienced the worst sessions imaginable because of bad homebrew.

Ed Zachary
04-10-2007, 10:41 AM
Ptolus home page:
http://www.ptolus.com/cgi-bin/page.cgi?ptolus

From what I gathered, Ptolus was designed by Monte Cook, and is now owned by White Wolf.

My question is... how compatible is it with D&D 3.5 rules, will I have to do alot of modifications??

Ed Zachary
04-10-2007, 10:53 AM
What's odd is that in 26 years of gaming (I started with the Basic red box in '81), I've never bought a single D&D setting book nor played more than a single game session in a D&D campaign set in a published setting.


Whoa. That's ... that's amazing. You, sir, might be the most stalwart home-brewer I've ever met.

Same here, so now there are two of us!

Other DMs and myself have borrowed individual modules, but never whole scenarios. And the modules I've borrowed as DM, I did my own significant editing to them.


I enjoy a good homebrew ... don't get me wrong. I ran a homebrew world in college that lasted five years. But I think the homebrew world builder can learn a lot by looking at what others have wrought before you. For example I am so very glad that I read the Al-Qadim main book, Sharn: City of Towers, Ptolus, Shackled City, Nyambe, A Magical Medieval Society: Western Europe, Silk Road, the original Ravenloft, almost everything written for Midnight ... I could go on. These are great books and I think that they've made me both a better GM and a better creator of campaigns.

The principal problem with playing a "world in a box", is that there is an obligation to buy everything that comes out for that scenario. You have players who have read as much or than you have, and your secrets are not secrets any more. And face it, not everything the author writes (or even the majority) is applicable to the campaign you want to run.

I prefer a campaign that is more focused on the characters the players have introduced, and creating power structures around what they are interested in. Sure I borrow from many other sources, and with a home brew you can add whatever you want anywhere you want, with as many alterations as you want.

Most of my friends and I are a big readers of history and philosophy, not so much science fiction. That's why a campaign setting that mirrors our own ancient world had worked so much better for us.

Digital Arcanist
04-10-2007, 03:11 PM
Well Ed, from my understanding you need the PHB to actually play Ptolus as the 120 dollar book is just a campaign setting and not a rulebook. Ptolus is published by the same division that does Swords and Sorcery so I would think that if you are familiar with Exalted then you would use those rules in leiu of the D&D style of d20 rules. Our DM likes 3.5, as does the rest of the group, so we play with D&D rules. I have promised not to look at my copy of the campaign setting because we are playing the first couple modules published in the book right now, so I don't know too much about the book.

Never having played S&S, but knowing that the sourcebooks are titled in variations of D&D books, ie. Arcana Evolved, I would think S&S is just a rip-off of D&D. Go White Wolf!!

Digital Arcanist
04-10-2007, 03:16 PM
In my opinion ED, no one should ever play in a prolonged campaign using a published setting. It should always be homebrew or just the generic setting given in the rulebooks.

I love to put together a pick-up group for an all-day event every couple of months. We only use published stuff just so we can get together and play. The players are always different so continuing on with an old game isn't feasible. I like playing in a published setting because you can just get in and play immediately because its all done for you and takes out all the headaches and inconsistencies often found in homebrew.

Ed Zachary
04-10-2007, 06:25 PM
Well Ed, from my understanding you need the PHB to actually play Ptolus as the 120 dollar book is just a campaign setting and not a rulebook. Ptolus is published by the same division that does Swords and Sorcery so I would think that if you are familiar with Exalted then you would use those rules in leiu of the D&D style of d20 rules.

Whatever it costs... $120... $200... $300... whatever. What I would like to know is if it would be ready to play right away with D&D 3.5 rules. I am not a dedicated gamer, in that I am familiar with multiple systems. I made the commitment to learn 3.5, and I also know White Wolf's Vampire and Mage (both obsolete?). It sounds like Ptolus was not set up per D&D rules, and I'd have to do alot of setup work. I'm too busy with Job, family and house to put in great amounts of work.

Digital Arcanist
04-11-2007, 06:03 AM
Its a campaign setting and not a rulebook so you can use pretty much any d20 rule system you like. My DM likes 3.5 so thats what we are using. The book has a swords and sorcery logo on it so its part of that system, which is darn near identical to D&D d20 rules.

Vampire and Mage aren't obsolete....just different

gdmcbride
04-11-2007, 07:24 AM
From what I gathered, Ptolus was designed by Monte Cook, and is now owned by White Wolf.

My question is... how compatible is it with D&D 3.5 rules, will I have to do alot of modifications??

Ptolus uses the 3.5 rules. It is based off the SRD so you won't see non-open content from WOTC (like the Warlock or the Illithid), but it is 100% 3.5 compatible. No modifications will be necessary.

Ptolus, though distributed by White Wolf as part of Monte Cook's Malhavoc imprint, remains 100% owned by Monte Cook himself.

And according to Monte, Ptolus the rule book is a complete product. There are no plans for a supplement. There are two modules in print -- Ptolus: Night of Dissolution and Ptolus: Queen of Lies. Ptolus: Queen of Lies is actually an older module written by Monte (originally published in sort of a proto-Ptolus) that has been updated by Fiery Dragon to be 100% Ptolus-compatible. Ptolus: Night of Dissolution is a module written along side the massive Ptolus tome and came bundled with it during pre-order.

Also Ptolus references two earlier Monte Cook Malhavoc products, Bane Warrens and Chaositech, which are included as PDFs in the CD that accompanies the Ptolus book.

As far as there never being any supplements ... we shall see. Ptolus remains a remarkable seller. Word on the grape vine is that it may actually end up being the single most profitable RPG book of 2006, even outpacing any single WOTC release. If that is true (and it really couldn't happen to a nicer book) than the siren call of Ptolus 2: Electric Boogaloo (or whatever) may be pretty damn strong.

Gary

gdmcbride
04-11-2007, 07:36 AM
It sounds like Ptolus was not set up per D&D rules, and I'd have to do alot of setup work. I'm too busy with Job, family and house to put in great amounts of work.

As I said above 100% compatible ... no work at all.

But I'd like to mention one thing -- Ptolus came into being as Monte Cook was playtesting the original D&D 3.0 rules. So in many ways it is not only set up for the D&D rules, it is perhaps the most "D&Dish" of any setting.

It's core concept is a world where the magic and assumptions of the D&D 3.x rule set are fully integrated into the concept. So, the spell 'zone of truth' exists -- how does that affect the culture? Paladins can detect evil at will - what does that do to the world? Why would there ever be a dungeon stocked with monsters and traps? These are all issues taken up and answered by the world.

What really suprised me about the book is how 'Cthulhoid' the book really is. There is a lot of stuff that to me could easily have fit inside the Call of Cthulhu d20 book (another Monte Cook project BTW).

Gary

Ed Zachary
04-11-2007, 09:23 AM
Ptolus uses the 3.5 rules. It is based off the SRD so you won't see non-open content from WOTC (like the Warlock or the Illithid), but it is 100% 3.5 compatible. No modifications will be necessary.

OK... let me be extremely specific with my question...

The campaign world contains NPCs and monsters, right... are their details (abilities, classes, races, levels, spells, skills, feats, etc) presented in the books?

gdmcbride
04-11-2007, 10:53 AM
OK... let me be extremely specific with my question...

The campaign world contains NPCs and monsters, right... are their details (abilities, classes, races, levels, spells, skills, feats, etc) presented in the books?

Yes. How's that for an extremely specific answer?

Gary

Ed Zachary
04-11-2007, 11:17 AM
Yes. How's that for an extremely specific answer?

Gary

Muchas gracias senor, yo voy a comprar ese libro ahora!

gdmcbride
04-11-2007, 06:03 PM
Muchas gracias senor, yo voy a comprar ese libro ahora!

De nada.

Gary

RealmsDM
04-18-2007, 10:31 PM
I'm a Forgotten Realms player now, but the more I read Dugeon Magazine's "adventure path" series (currently Savage Tide) I'm drawn to the old D&D style setting. I mean c'mon, they're using the Isle of Dread!!!

F**kin' A man! :cool:

gdmcbride
04-19-2007, 07:27 AM
I'm a Forgotten Realms player now, but the more I read Dugeon Magazine's "adventure path" series (currently Savage Tide) I'm drawn to the old D&D style setting. I mean c'mon, they're using the Isle of Dread!!!

F**kin' A man! :cool:

"Savage Tide" is damn spectacular so far. I find myself waiting each month eagerly for the next chapter. I am so totally fan boy over this AP.

"Shackled City", the first Dungeon AP, needed some work. Fortunately, it got some work and was released as a tremendous hardcover.

"Age of Worms", the second AP, had some really good adventures, but never grabbed me like ST or SC did. Still...it does have Dragotha, the undead dragon, mentioned in the map in White Plume Mountain. But definitely my least favorite AP. Someday, hopefully they'll put out a hardcover book for it and fix it like they did Shackled City.

Alas, WOTC has yet to approve such a release and, since some speculate they fear competition with their upcoming Expedition series, they may never give it.

ENWorld has been releasing a PDF only AP "War of the Burning Sky". They are only three chapters in ... but so far, its as good as anything Dungeon has done. Being a PDF product it has one great advantage over the Dungeon APs -- length. It's art is certainly inferior to Paizo's high standards, but the writing has so far been amazing.

You can download a free campaign guide from:
http://www.enworld.org/index.php?page=burningsky

Gary

Albeehotep
04-27-2007, 09:20 AM
the realms for sure but i thought spelljammer was interesting
Al

Revolt268
04-27-2007, 10:19 AM
I never played spelljammer as a pen and paper, but I did play a PC game based on it, that was a great game and I wish they would remake it. As for the realm i liked the most, I guess I would have to go with Forgotten realms since its the one I have the most experience with and I do enjoy it.

Kilrex
05-16-2007, 05:47 AM
Love playing in the Realms. I enjoyed Birthright alot also, but we played with a few house rules. Spelljammer was ok, but if I wanted space ships I would play one of the sci-fi games.

Ed Zachary
05-16-2007, 06:45 AM
I'm a Forgotten Realms player now, but the more I read Dugeon Magazine's "adventure path" series (currently Savage Tide) I'm drawn to the old D&D style setting.

I hope that you and others would share some of the stories from your FR campaigns.

Digital Arcanist
05-16-2007, 06:54 PM
This one time in the Forgotten Realms........

TheYeti1775
05-22-2007, 08:23 AM
Hmm.. I guess technically that's right. I think of anything after the 5-box Dungeons and Dragons set that I first owned as Advanced Dungeons and Dragons -- from 1st edition on.

Speaking of which? Does anyone actually still have those boxed sets? It'd be cool to look through those again, and reminisce about the days when Elf was a class :)
Still have the books, though the boxes themselves have disappeared over time.


Considering how hard WotC has pushed and committed to the Eberron project, there are surprisingly few people from this (albeit limited) poll who actually prefer that setting.
I bought the initial Campaign Setting book, but it didn't really grab me in a way to want to buy more of them.


the realms for sure but i thought spelljammer was interesting
Al
Loved Spelljammer and would love a single hardcover book on it for remake in 3.5, definitely would have it pre-ordered.


My order of preference for worlds.
1. Spelljammer - You can visit all the rest
2. Dawnforge - D20 world published by Fantasy Flight Games
3. Valus - D20 world published by Different Worlds
4. Greyhawk - always liked it
5. Forgotten Realms - loved it when it first came out even on through 2E, but after time the enchantment wore off. The overbearing ness of an Elminster or a Drizzt showing up in most campaigns left it as something that has become bloated from too much time in the sun.
6. Known World (Mystra) - It's where it all started for me.

ajmuszkiewicz
06-21-2007, 09:37 AM
All published DnD worlds have been WAAAAAY too anglocentric for me. Forgotten Realms is quite possibly one of the worst-written pieces of anglocentric propaganda & tripe ever.

Token
06-21-2007, 12:32 PM
All published DnD worlds have been WAAAAAY too anglocentric for me. Forgotten Realms is quite possibly one of the worst-written pieces of anglocentric propaganda & tripe ever.

I think I may get the angolocentric part of your statement. FR does model itself after some of the modern notions of historical Europe. But then FR also includes Kara-Tur (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kara-Tur), Al-Qadim (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al-Qadim), and Maztica (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maztica) as optional areas to play in as well...

What I don't understand is the "propaganda" part. Its a fictional setting. What kind of propaganda could it possibly be spreading?

Ed Zachary
07-01-2007, 12:10 PM
All published DnD worlds have been WAAAAAY too anglocentric for me. Forgotten Realms is quite possibly one of the worst-written pieces of anglocentric propaganda & tripe ever.

Interesting analysis. Would you care to back it up with some examples?

Nerve Gas
07-01-2007, 06:10 PM
It seems that everyone either likes Forgotten Realms or hates it with a passion. I enjoy it the most because of it's variety. Almost any type of campaign can be had there. Oriental, pirate linked, or just good 'ol dragon killing. And I am not sure, but even the generic D&D has used a lot of FR work, particularly the Underdark.
I think the best part is the number of different writers that have populated the world. It is not controlled by one or two individuals. And it is large enough that you can add your own stuff to a campaign to make it yours. How much of the world you use is up to you. I don't let my players interact with Drizzt, but nothing is wrong with them doing a good deed and being congratulated by Elminster. He might even give them a tip or two.

blue_jean13
07-02-2007, 11:04 PM
i like mixing everything i mean if one of my players comes in with a forgotten realms book and see something they want to play as im not going to say hell know there not in this world. i also use locations made up and from other settings.but if i had to choose one it would be forgotten realms but that is to limiting.

Zorastor
07-08-2007, 07:48 PM
I enjoy creaing the realms from scratch myself... but of the Store bought realms Ive played in I found Ravenloft a lot of fun

The_Shaman
07-18-2007, 05:14 AM
I consider FR a pretty decent setting as far as things go. Of course, I have no problem inserting material that was not in the FRCS - it's big enough to allow goliaths, incarnum, and Ao knows what else. The high-level NPCs are more of a bonus than a problem, at least if the DM does not use deus ex machina too much - it's nice to know that there is a history to the setting, and that you are not the only thing ever to change the world.

Nillic
07-18-2007, 09:23 AM
I'm with DrakanFyre (http://www.penandpapergames.com/forums/member.php?u=489). Eberron is by far the best and most innovative setting that has happened to D&D since forever. Forgotten Realms is bland, plain high fantasy with some crazy gods thrown in for kicks. Walking around in Waterdeep could be any large fantasy town, but walking around Sharn, you know whats up and where you are. There isn't another city around made of miles high towers supported by the elemental plain of air. On top of what DrakanFyre (http://www.penandpapergames.com/forums/member.php?u=489) said about alignments and the looseness and grayness of who is good and who is bad. The orcs are more than just 1st level beat'em ups. They have a for real history that saved the world, and Goblinoids have a history as well. Forgotten Realms? Orcs and goblins are bad, kill them. Drizzt is the only redeeming feature of the realms, otherwise give me The Lord of Blades anytime

Moritz
07-18-2007, 09:44 AM
Sounds like I need to check into Ebberon. I've never given it a second look, but the way many describe it, there may be some great potential for ripping off for my world.

Ed Zachary
07-18-2007, 02:26 PM
Sounds like I need to check into Ebberon. I've never given it a second look, but the way many describe it, there may be some great potential for ripping off for my world.

Yeah, but I'd kill all the tech stuff. I'd rather see flying carpets than airships.

Moritz
07-18-2007, 03:00 PM
Yeah, but I'd kill all the tech stuff. I'd rather see flying carpets than airships.

Which is why I never gave it a second look. Too much of that SpellJammer stuff that turned me off.

The_Shaman
07-20-2007, 11:46 AM
Weird, I find Drizzt rather annoying at times. Talk about denial. I may need to check the books on Liriel Baenre or Jarlaxle. As for orcs and goblins being 1st level enemies - any setting can, and often has, orc paladins. Some just happen to be rare.I have a problem with Eberron, as I do not get any feeling from it... The idea that a setting should deliberately aim to include all types.

Argent
07-22-2007, 01:19 PM
Forgotten Realms will always have first place as my favourite setting. It was the first one to really capture my imagination way back in 1st Ed. And as it was created by a fellow Canadian, it is of particular specialness to me.

But I have enjoyed Eberron lately, having just sort of poked my nose into the setting. And we are playing a Planescape campaign right now, updated to 3.5. And I am in the process of putting together a Birthright campaign right now, combining the best features of role-playing and Masters of Orion-style empire building.

So really, my favourite is whatever I can make fun. :rolleyes:

lachlanfin
07-22-2007, 07:23 PM
Dragonlance is easily my favorite. DL has such an indepth history that every era has a completely different feel. Another thing is that Dragons are a main focus of the gaming and novels. Some worlds it like playing Dungeons & Dungeons. I have enjoyed many FR games as well. I can't figure why anyone would want to play Eberron though.

Nillic
07-23-2007, 09:27 AM
I can't figure why anyone would want to play Eberron though.
Could you please give some reasons for this? Besides "I don't like it" Because Eberron has just as much history as Dragonlance, just less novels written about it. I mean ever age in Eberron has been ruled by a different race altogether, so how much more different do you get than that? Don't get me wrong, Dragonlance started me out in the fantasy genre and will always have a special place for me, but I really would like some answers as to what is wrong with Eberron, because all people can ever tell me is I don't like it, and for a philosophy major that just doesn't cut it.

Moritz
07-23-2007, 09:48 AM
I realize this question wasn't addressed to me, but I figure as someone who hasn't really taken to Eberron, I'd put in my two cents.

One of my turn-offs of Eberron was the art. When looking to buy a new book, I go flipping through pages. If the art and imagery doesn't fit with what I have in my head, then I put the book away. Eberron always struck me as something like Spelljammer or Steampunk Mechwarrior meets D&D. That may have been a wrong first impression, but ever since that point, I just avoided the books that were titled Eberron.

InfoStorm
07-23-2007, 12:23 PM
My favorite setting has been the original D&D game world, Mystata, with Karameikos, Thyantis, and the whole rest. I still think that, with the Gazzetteers they release for them, it is one of the more detailed settings. I'd run again in that world, not too hard to tweek NPC's.

Ed Zachary
07-23-2007, 03:11 PM
I really would like some answers as to what is wrong with Eberron, because all people can ever tell me is I don't like it, and for a philosophy major that just doesn't cut it.

It flat out sux as a D&D product, because it does. WotC tried to glue tech stuff to a magic and melee game. They should be separate games, then WotC can pull a White Wolf and introduce a new game every quarter.

Argent
07-23-2007, 04:48 PM
It flat out sux as a D&D product, because it does.

Not exactly a compelling argument, Ed. Why does it "suck"? If you don't like it, that's cool; nobody has to like everything. But I happen to think that the game world has a lot going for it; a rich history, and interesting alternate cosmology, and a fascinating take on blending magic and technology in a Renaissance-style setting. I for one particularly liked that last bit; sort of a look at what might have happened if Da Vinci had access to magic.

Having said that, the overall world does not appeal to me. About the onlt two places of interest for me are the Jungles of Xen'drik, and the city of Sharn. The rest of the world does nothing new for me that I can't get in the Realms or Ptolus. But that doesn't make the setting "suck".


WotC tried to glue tech stuff to a magic and melee game.

Umm...I don't see any "tech stuff" in the main book (I have it open right now). Is there a supplement that introduces "tech"? Because all I see are innovative uses of magic, things that, really, are the logical next step if you live in a world pervaded by magic. The history of mankind has been about finding ways to exploit resources as we find them. Magic would be a considerable resource to exploit, and the Eberron setting reflects that.


They should be separate games, then WotC can pull a White Wolf and introduce a new game every quarter.

Not being a huge White Wolf fan I can't speak to this point. Except to say that a quick glance at their web-site and specifically the release schedule doesn't support your position.

But I'm interested to hear your actual reasoning behind "it sux because it does", and I look forward to reading that. For now, I'll settle for actually answering the original question...

Argent
07-23-2007, 05:01 PM
Could you please give some reasons for this? Besides "I don't like it" Because Eberron has just as much history as Dragonlance, just less novels written about it. I mean ever age in Eberron has been ruled by a different race altogether, so how much more different do you get than that? Don't get me wrong, Dragonlance started me out in the fantasy genre and will always have a special place for me, but I really would like some answers as to what is wrong with Eberron, because all people can ever tell me is I don't like it, and for a philosophy major that just doesn't cut it.

I'm not sure why people are polarized over Eberron, either. I have met very few people who (like myself) like parts of it but are not fanatical about how awesome it is, or conversely dislike parts of it but aren't rabid in that dislike. Most people love it beyond measure or think it "sux".

I'll give you my opinion on Eberron, as someone that can take it or leave it. I like certain parts of the setting; the history, the cosmology, the renaissance-style magical innovations. Geographically speaking I like Sharn and Xen'drik, because they are just different enough from the norm to make them truly interesting adventure locales.

But the rest of Eberron doesn't excite me, doesn't make me want to play there before all other settings. Most of the rest of Eberron is not that different from the Realms or Oerth, and the fact that I can ride the lightning rail is just not enough to get me go there by preference.

Having said that, maybe I just need a really enthusiastic Eberron DM to set me straight. Goddess knows, a good DM can cover many sins. ;) But for now, while I certainly find reading the books to be entertaining and interesting, I'll keep using the Realms and Ptolus as my primary setting. And who knows; the players might get caught up in the building of a lightning rail system linking Waterdeep and the North...:D

But I'd like to discuss this further, do you have specific things you love about the Eberron setting?

InfoStorm
07-24-2007, 03:17 PM
To chime in on the Ebberon discussion. I will not say that Ebberon is a horrible game setting, I've only played it a couple times. Ebberon feels like it appeals to different play styles. The races added for the setting, and the setting itself, from what I've read on it, target more potitical intrigue than many of the other settings. Sure F.R. has politics, but they are back stage to exploration and monster mayhem.

My personal tastes for D&D make me NOT a fan of the Ebberon setting, for some of the above, and as I do not like the pseodu technology of the setting. If I want technology in my fantasy setting, I'll use REAL technology from the Shadow Run or DragonStar settings. BUT, that is my tastes.

Ed Zachary
07-24-2007, 03:57 PM
Not exactly a compelling argument, Ed. Why does it "suck"?

I didn't say that the setting sucked, it was the gluing of tech to magic. perhaps I will look into the setting.

Argent
07-24-2007, 07:17 PM
Perhaps if you read the rest of my post you're question would've been answered. So you really didn't see any tech stuff in Eberron? And I didn't say that the setting sucked, it was the gluing of tech to magic.

Ummm...I did read the rest of that post, Ed. I actually quoted it in it's entirety as part of my response post. But you didn't give any reasons for the suckage, thus the confusion.

And as I said, I don't see any "tech", just innovative uses of magic. Maybe there is a distinction I'm missing, and you could point it out to me.

But as I also said, no one has to like everything. If you don't like Eberron, that's cool.

Nillic
07-25-2007, 09:57 AM
Thank you Argent for you intelligent discussion of this topic, it's nice to have someone who will discuss the ups and downs of something and not just label it.
Specifically the advancement of magic really appeals to me because I never understood how D&D civilizations lasted 1000's of years and never advanced beyond prestigitation for cleaning up or spicing food, i mean look at us, in the course of 100 years we've gone from no cars to flying in space and talking instantly over 100's of miles, why wouldn't a civilization based on magic (which can do more than technology) be able to advance the same way?
Another really appealing thing for me is the emphasis of roleplaying over overt combat. I mean if you want a dungeon crawl, there are plenty of places to do it, but if you want an indepth machavillian (did i spell that right?) intrigue campaign, its all there and then some. I also like the looseness of alignments (leaders of a LG church being LE) because it reflects more of a modern idea of morality. Maybe the innkeeper is corruptedly evil, but that doesn't mean he'll outright attack you just because his alignment is evil. Also as I mentioned the richness of the history of the monster races (goblinoids, orcs, aberations) is a nice change from the norm. There are numerous other things as well!

Ed Zachary
07-29-2007, 04:16 PM
I have only played Eberron a few times, but from what I've read and what I experienced playing DDO, it strikes me as more as the lost world of Atlantis type feel, as far as the technology level goes. My problem was more trying to get interested in the political and historical dynamics.

Speaking for mysrelf and the other players I knew ad DM and player, we never had a problem getting into the politics. But it sucks if you're a low level peon and can't influence anything. It rocks if you're powerful enough to set the tone of the politics. For us it came down to having the politics and history mean something to the characters. That usually doesn't happen at lower levels.

Moritz
07-30-2007, 09:43 AM
I did not like DDO at all.

Nillic
07-30-2007, 12:55 PM
If you're judging Eberron based off of DDO then no wonder you don't like it. DDO is crap and its representation of Eberron is like watered down ale, thats been sitting in the barrel for 8 years, then someone pissed in it... Needless to say, the Eberron of DDO is not the Eberron from the setting.

Moritz
07-30-2007, 01:04 PM
I didn't like DDO mainly because it wasn't really the D&D I know and love. NWN was far closer to the rules.

Argent
07-31-2007, 07:43 AM
I didn't like DDO mainly because it wasn't really the D&D I know and love. NWN was far closer to the rules.

True. I'm actually in the process of playing through NWN again, after a few year break from the game. And I have to say, it is a lot of fun. I am especially enjoying the toolset, which allows you to craft your own modules for the game, and then play through them or offer them up for others to play. Awesome!

Skunkape
07-31-2007, 07:48 AM
I've been slowly but surely playing through the NWN 2 campaign. I do like the game and wish I could get my group to let me run a campaign using it, but we just don't have time to do both face to face and a computer based game.

I've played a little with the toolset and plan on using it some more when I get time!

Moritz
08-01-2007, 07:54 AM
True. I'm actually in the process of playing through NWN again, after a few year break from the game. And I have to say, it is a lot of fun. I am especially enjoying the toolset, which allows you to craft your own modules for the game, and then play through them or offer them up for others to play. Awesome!

I designed a world. Had over 450 zones (indoor and outdoor), had a great server, excellent code/scripting, and made it persistent. Invited all my friends to play, and most of them got pissed off at one another so instead of like 14 players, I ended up with 4.

I scrapped that world for another one. 75 zones, low magic. Then the server host moved to denver and haven't created anything since.

But I totally love designing NWN modules.

TheYeti1775
08-06-2007, 11:02 AM
Considering how hard WotC has pushed and committed to the Eberron project, there are surprisingly few people from this (albeit limited) poll who actually prefer that setting.
Most fall into a love it or hate it with it. Me, I'm very indifferent to it, as I said before it never grabbed me enough to want to play in it. Though I have.


I think if you have an open-minded gaming group, who have fun playing the game together, any setting gets charged with the group's energy and becomes memorable. Well, okay, maybe not Spelljammer... (sorry, Hamsters).
What's wrong with Giant Space Hamsters? Or are you talking about the Fire-Breathing ones? He!! hath no fury like a Gnome on Fire-Breathing Hamster-back charging you. :p


The principal problem with playing a "world in a box", is that there is an obligation to buy everything that comes out for that scenario. You have players who have read as much or than you have, and your secrets are not secrets any more. And face it, not everything the author writes (or even the majority) is applicable to the campaign you want to run.
One of the things I love about Dawnforge. 3 books total, and thats it. Fantasy Flight Games dropped support of it. A DM is free to use the Template however he desires. :D


I never played spelljammer as a pen and paper, but I did play a PC game based on it, that was a great game and I wish they would remake it. As for the realm i liked the most, I guess I would have to go with Forgotten realms since its the one I have the most experience with and I do enjoy it.
You know I never played the computer SJ game. Almost want to get a copy and fire up the old 300mHz machine.


Sounds like I need to check into Ebberon. I've never given it a second look, but the way many describe it, there may be some great potential for ripping off for my world.
I have a DM that constantly rips things from Ebberron for us. Especially the Artificers. That is one of the few things I do like about it outright.

rabkala
08-07-2007, 11:57 AM
I played Spelljammer as a pen and paper. I loved the feel of it. It is so far out there, a person has to suspend their belief of reality to enjoy it. Most people I have tried to drag into it have not. I tried to revive it in my Sunday game a short while back. I let it drop after a short trial run.

I have never really given Eberon a second look. I disliked the way WoTC pushed it. I have collected so much info on so many different settings that buying yet more seemed foolish to me.

I eventually warmed to the Kalamar setting. Possibly to Eberron one day also.

TheYeti1775
08-07-2007, 01:27 PM
I eventually warmed to the Kalamar setting. Possibly to Eberron one day also.

I read the Kalamar setting book, it read like a history book. It is a well thought out world and I would recommend it as good source material. But as a read it was very very boring.

va_paladin
08-13-2007, 08:56 PM
Forgotten Realms - My favorite without a doubt.
I love Celtic themed campaigns, so it has been very easy for me to start many of my campaigns in the Moonshae Islands. As the heroes, villains, and deities are well represented in all the source material and books available it gives the players a sense of already being in the world before they enter it.

Argent
08-14-2007, 11:40 AM
Forgotten Realms - My favorite without a doubt.
I love Celtic themed campaigns, so it has been very easy for me to start many of my campaigns in the Moonshae Islands. As the heroes, villains, and deities are well represented in all the source material and books available it gives the players a sense of already being in the world before they enter it.

Ah, the Moonshaes! One of my favourite campaigns started in the Moonshaes. We began as youths in a village, wanting to start lives as adventurers. Then we eventually ended up on the mainland near Baldur's Gate; culture shock! Our DM was very good at playing the cultural differences, even between humans, so it was very much a "country mouse in the big city" feel when we arrived in BG. Sadly, the campaign ended before we even cracked 5th level.:(

RealmsDM
08-14-2007, 08:24 PM
Forgotten Realms is top dog for me right now (and has been for a looong time), but Greyhawk will always be #1 for me. So many memories, iconic characters, and memorable advenures.... ah, The lost caverns of Tsojcanth, Against the giants, Vault of the Drow, Tomb of Horrors... man, I wish i could go back & play them all for the 1st time all over again.

Kell Tainer
08-14-2007, 09:01 PM
I tend to run mostly homebrew campaigns, but I usually include a fair amount of Dragonlance stuff in my campaigns. For instance I modified the Solamnic Knights prestige classes to work with the setting that I will hopefully start running soon.

Also, I love the Draconians and their death throes.

rabkala
08-25-2007, 11:07 AM
I tend to run mostly homebrew campaigns, but I usually include a fair amount of Dragonlance stuff in my campaigns. For instance I modified the Solamnic Knights prestige classes to work with the setting that I will hopefully start running soon.

Also, I love the Draconians and their death throes.

Well when it comes to Dragonlance, the draconians and the Solamic knights are some of the best things things to import into a game. There are many elements that serve a good purpose in the novels, but I just don't want in my game (kender and gully dwarves anyone?). I don't understand the people who get all worked up about cannon. I saw a thread about gem draconians at wizards that I think I will have to use in the near future.

Some_call_me_Tim
09-07-2007, 09:26 PM
My vote would be Greyhawk.

Of course I have to give a shoutout to Dave Arneson's Blackmoor.

Lest we forget the Judges' Guild Wilderlands.

Hmmm. Call me old school, nothing from this millennium. The first two date to the original D&D, I think Wilderlands is the new kid, only goes back to first edition.

Oldgamer
09-17-2007, 10:50 AM
I started playing D&D back in '83 and my first module was also the setting for my first fantasy book...Dragons of Autumn Twilight. Dragonlance has since been my favorite...I don't know if it it because it was my first world....or if there seems to be a more personal note in the world...but it has been my longstanding favorite.

Farcaster
09-19-2007, 01:43 PM
There are lots of great elements to Dragonlance! The first and foremost probably being that the War of the Lance gave the world a great epic story background. The whole setting just feels rich with history and magic isn't quite as prolific as it is in the Forgotten Realms. Unfortunately, I think the intrigue of having a game in that world is somewhat diminished if the players have never read a single novel of Dragonlance fiction. I tried to introduce my players to Dragonlance, and they just couldn't get into it. So, back to Forgotten Realms we went, a setting they had already come to know and love.

Oldgamer
09-19-2007, 02:30 PM
I agree, read the 1st book (Dragons of Autumn Twilight[no free ad here]) and you will get the feel of the world and it's circumstances of that time. There are many, many books written in that world, I stopped reading them about the Second Age when I ran out of time to read as much...I still have my originals, about 20-30 of them or so...

Digital Arcanist
09-19-2007, 05:01 PM
I'm glad I'm not the only Dragonlance fan here. Forgotten Realms is still my favorite setting but I love to read the Dragonlance novels.

I have 4 six foot book shelves packed full of FR, Dragonlance, and now Eberron novels. In hindsight, I am glad there are so few people who like these novels because it makes it so much easier to find them at used book stores. I think the total for my FR and Dragonlance collections came to around 400 dollars. That includes every novel up to and including the July releases of this year.

I might be moving into your area Farcaster, and if I do then we will definitely have to play something in the Dragonlance setting.

Oldgamer
09-20-2007, 09:14 AM
I have only one 6' book shelf dedicated to Fantasy books, but they are all Dragonlance. I have a few other 6' book shelves but they have horror, mystery, and misc. non-fiction. I then have a drawer next to my home PC that has the original modules DL1-DL16 that the first trilogy was written about.

MortonStromgal
10-17-2007, 03:03 PM
I liked Dragonlance best before Baldur's Gate PC game came out then I liked that part of the Forgotton Realms. Several video games later the Sword Coast and the North both have very good memories. However I don't really care about the rest of the Realms. Nor do I like Dragonlance after the War of the Lance. Honorable mentions for Dark Sun and Ravenloft for having that "its differnt" apeal. For non-TSR/WOTC settings I like Kingdoms of Kalimar and Wilderlands but honestly I still play/run Forgotton Realms the most, I just tend to stick to the Sword Coast.

Olothfaern
12-08-2007, 04:58 AM
I like to use all the stuff from the different worlds

if I had to go published, then it would be a toss up between Spelljammer and Planescape (and to a certain extent, Ravenloft) because they allow you to use all the stuff from the different worlds.

Malruhn
12-17-2007, 04:54 PM
Eberlancegrayravenscape HomebrewRealms is my real favorite.

I have stolen aspects from everything I have ever played, read or heard about. There are parts of every campaign world that I really like and want to continue using - and there are parts of every campaign world that really give me a headache over one eye... and I will never use.

So I use my own - and if you are well gamed, you will recognize pieces parts of all sorts of different worlds.

Farcaster
12-17-2007, 05:07 PM
Eberlancegrayravenscape HomebrewRealms

LOL!

Thriondel Half-Elven
12-19-2007, 10:24 PM
definatly the FORGOTTEN REALMS!!! its by far the coolest one. but its been my only one. and i have no thought of leaving Faerun any time soon

Bloodwyrm
01-06-2008, 06:52 AM
I Chose Forgotten Realms, for the simple fact that i have an atlas of forgotten realms, i've read all the books, and im able to understand most of the back story of adventures that others create. I can also create adventures a lot easier as well.

tesral
01-06-2008, 09:59 PM
Mine. When I started playing pre-made settings were still in the future. You had to make up your own world. So I did. Thindacarulle is the result of 32 years of constant play. It is high fantasy. Lots of magic lots of differnet races. A highly evolved politcal structure. I cannot describe the whole world in one post.

Mulsiphix
01-07-2008, 02:11 AM
I admit Eberron is the only setting I have really read into deeply but I am quite taken with it. I love the art in the books and I really like the setting. I've done quite a bit of Greyhawk reading as well. It is pretty awesome but Eberron takes the cake for my tastes.

Hutton
04-02-2008, 09:03 PM
The Known World of the old non-advanced Dungeons & Dragons.

nijineko
04-03-2008, 07:08 AM
mine. which is a mix of all the stuff i like from all the settings, plus other settings that may or may not be d&d, or even tsr/wotc. however, i do use the greyhawk maps more often than not. and i think that greyhawk has formed most of the baseline, as well.

cplmac
04-03-2008, 07:51 PM
I had to go with Dragonlance, mostly due to the fact that I have never played in any of the other settings in the list. I have played campaings that were not in Dragonlance, but they weren't in any particular world setting.

The Silencer
04-03-2008, 07:56 PM
Ive always liked GreyHawk but I dont think people have actually played it when things got started it was Greyhawk but Forgotten Realms seem to come out at AD&D's Highest..

tesral
04-04-2008, 08:47 AM
As has been noted, Eberon and Forgotten Realms seem to be the most popular, and the least popular.

chosenderrick
05-23-2008, 09:55 AM
Rokugan and Iron Kingdoms. I think Iron Kingdoms is the most different of all the D&D games. It has the inclusion of guns and Machinery as magic. Cool idea. It took some getting use to though.

russdm
05-23-2008, 10:12 AM
I wanted to select other for Dark Sun, But I went with Dragonlance, as I like it as well.

MooseAlmighty
05-23-2008, 12:30 PM
Since no one else is going to, it then falls to me to give Eberron some love.

I love the idea of magic being industrialized and used to benefit the masses; the intrigue between the nations, houses, even continents; the looser interpretations on alignments on a personal and racial level; the unitarian nature of religion and the layout of the planes...

I love how you can play an orc, drow, minotaur, or lizardfolk without having to justify it; I love how the medusa or mind flayer can be an ally as easily as an enemy, and how the same goes for a gold dragon; I love the aura of pulp adventure and exploration, as well as the sense of impending destiny or cataclysm.
.

Yep that pretty much says everything I love about Eberron! Still this was a hard vote.

I spent a loooong time running/playing in the Realms. Loved it when it was first released and kept up with it during later editions. But it was losing its luster as it became more and more high-powered and players were expecting the novels to be canon. I never read most of them nor incorporated them in my campaigns - not even the Avatar crud during the 2nd edition launch. (don't get me wrong, I enjoy a good DnD novel from time to time. I just prefer them to be examples of adventures in that setting - not actually impacting the PnP game world. I want my players to be the epic heroes)

And a long time before that was spent in Greyhawk and the Temple, the Giants, the Tomb, the Drow, the Barrier Peaks, etc. Great times

Tony Toxic Shock
05-24-2008, 03:50 PM
Al'Qadim at the moment esp. when I have all the bugs & Kinks striaghten out!:)

kaibrightwing
05-27-2008, 01:48 AM
my favorite is forgotten realms since the began, but 4th ed with spellpaugue is making me lose interest very quickly im going to see how it works before making judgement.

agoraderek
05-27-2008, 07:35 PM
my homebrew is my favorite, of course, but of the published settings i'd have to give the nod to the forgotten realms. since the 1st ed boxed set came out, i've played in that setting more than any other by a long shot (i've only dmed an FR campaign since 3ed was released, however). i did play in an eberron campaign that was a trip, though.

and, like tesral, my homebrew campaign has been in existence for far too long to explain, but to sum up: no alignments, low, down and dirty fantasy, rennaisance tech and culture, basically mirrors the real world, circa 1400. fun fact: paladins from opposing religions, both of whom think they are the righteous, correct path, will affect each other as if they were diametrically opposed (e.g. smite works both ways) because, you know, one man's evil...

tesral
05-27-2008, 11:45 PM
and, like tesral, my homebrew campaign has been in existence for far too long to explain, but to sum up: no alignments, low, down and dirty fantasy, rennaisance tech and culture, basically mirrors the real world, circa 1400. fun fact: paladins from opposing religions, both of whom think they are the righteous, correct path, will affect each other as if they were diametrically opposed (e.g. smite works both ways) because, you know, one man's evil...

Sounds like fun.

A point I make is that no sane man is the villain in his own mind. I don't care what you think of them, they consider themselves justified and right. So a Paladin of X is going to consider himself righteous in his viewpoint of god and the universe, and the Paladin of Y with exactly the opposite viewpoint will consider himself just as righteous and the other fellow vile and evil.

Demandred69
06-03-2008, 01:38 PM
I picked The Realms. There's a great diversity there. Lots of races, history, and places for adventure. Besides, you can't go wrong with anything Bob Salvatore is part of!;)
And Ed Greenwood is the king! Infact, I've read very few Realms material, on the whole, that weren't outstanding. The 3.5 Realms Campaign Book is my favorite D&D book to date. And I will pick it up in 4th edition.
If we were talking non-D&D here, I'd go with Morrowind.

Obah Bason
06-15-2008, 11:04 AM
I played in the Dragonlance setting during a few versions of D&D. Revised second edition, 3.0, and the 5th age set with the cards. It was versatile, dangerous, and best of all, being a bard wasn't useless!:laugh:

Arch Lich Thoth-Amon
06-23-2008, 11:38 PM
Greyhawk, Mystara, and Forgotten Realms. All good.

Thoth-Amon

tesral
06-24-2008, 12:01 AM
Greyhawk, Mystara, and Forgotten Realms. All good.

Thoth-Amon

Pretty much the three classic settings.

agoraderek
06-24-2008, 01:29 AM
the game was goofy (rolemaster lite...), but the old ICE MERP setting material went from ok to downright incredible, and the maps were always top notch. i used a lot of MERP 1st edition stuff, heavily modified, for my homebrew game.

much of it fit nicely into the forgotten realms campaign i ran a few years ago as well.

Arch Lich Thoth-Amon
06-24-2008, 01:44 AM
Yes, my best memories are of the old classics. To this day, when getting together with old players, i take a trip in an old module with players from my past. Just this year i played ToH & EttBP's. Ah, very good times.

Thoth-Amon

Engar
06-24-2008, 01:57 AM
Darksun.

Oldgamer
06-24-2008, 07:16 AM
Yes, my best memories are of the old classics. To this day, when getting together with old players, i take a trip in an old module with players from my past. Just this year i played ToH & EttBP's. Ah, very good times.

Thoth-Amon


We're beginning ToH shortly as a PbP on Mystweavers, but it's been converted to 3.5. Playing a 9th level Monk who will probably get his butt handed to him. But the DM said this was a true Gygaxian TPK and we will be allowed 5 characters each as replacements :laugh:

MooseAlmighty
06-24-2008, 12:28 PM
But the DM said this was a true Gygaxian TPK and we will be allowed 5 characters each as replacements :laugh:

Ha! Sounds like Paranoia :) Send in the clones...

Oldgamer
06-24-2008, 01:26 PM
The GM said we could make 5 different characters, or we can make 5 of the same characters with different builds to test them. :)

Arch Lich Thoth-Amon
06-24-2008, 10:25 PM
Pretty much the three classic settings.
Many of my best memories are from the classics.

Thoth-Amon

Mead
06-25-2008, 12:15 AM
I've always enjoyed running the 1e/2e Realms, it was so easy to plonk down my own stuff. Even had a short-lived campaign where the Realms were at war with, and losing to, Invading Evil Dark Forces From Beyond.

ryan973
06-25-2008, 08:40 AM
I am 100% with you. I have been running campaigns in Forgotten Realms since 2nd edition. It is by far my favorite gaming world. I recently sat in on a few games with a group that was playing in Eberron and I just couldn't get into it. Whenever some bit of political intrigue would come up, or something about the various house dynamics, my eyes would just glaze over. It just didn't click with me.

But, I love the richness of the Forgotten Realms setting. I wish D&D Online had gone the FR route instead of switching to Eberron mid-design. I would have LOVED to have experienced Waterdeep in a MMPOG.




I have to agree its also one of the only settings were i feel completly comfortable with high or even epic level play. In the realms no matter what level you are there is alwase danger.

TotemChakra
06-25-2008, 08:55 AM
I always enjoyed any campaign. Mostly Eberron out of all of the. Though, I prefer to make my own world because your ideals and flavor are added into the world. And for once, you can express yourself? I like Eberron only because it has a weird taste in mystery.

Webhead
06-27-2008, 12:00 PM
My favorite AD&D setting was my homebrew (if you could call it that) world, "Generica". ;) I never made any maps for it or anything as the world was basically my canvas upon which to paint whatever I needed to tell the adventure at hand. If I needed a specific geographic feature/ancient civilization/corrupt kindom to exist at "Point A" for the adventure...then it did. However I needed to shape the world to bring about my adventures, so it was. I liked it that way.

If I had to choose an "official, established" AD&D setting as my favorite, it would probably be Dark Sun, simply because it was so very unique from other typical fantasy worlds. Many players used to more traditional-style worlds could really be made to think differently about their approach to things in Dark Sun.

Kilrex
06-27-2008, 02:30 PM
If I had to choose an "official, established" AD&D setting as my favorite, it would probably be Dark Sun, simply because it was so very unique from other typical fantasy worlds. Many players used to more traditional-style worlds could really be made to think differently about their approach to things in Dark Sun.

I always liked Dark Sun a heap load. Most people I play with hate or dislike psionics immensely, so it is hard to find a group to play Dark Sun.

Webhead
06-27-2008, 02:50 PM
I always liked Dark Sun a heap load. Most people I play with hate or dislike psionics immensely, so it is hard to find a group to play Dark Sun.

Yeah, the only negative about Dark Sun was that everything and it's mother had psionic powers and the psionic rules in 2e were a little unwieldy. But I still loved a lot of the style of the setting and especially loved how different each of the "core" races was from their traditional counterparts. Athasian elves, for example, we much different from the elves you might meet in the Forgotten Realms, Greyhawk or Dragonlance.

Ramzei
06-30-2008, 09:49 PM
FR got my vote, to narrow that down even further.... Nethril. The casting system is amazing. However, it can lead to ruining of casters for the player (or GM) for a while. The system seperates the creative players from the not so. Being able to cast anything at any time based on Arcs (spell level points) rather than what you memorized that particaular day is a lot of fun. Spells not capping out make for some very powerful Arcanists (wizards). To play a Netherese campaign a lot is left to the GM as not much source material is out there for it. But, my GM was great so it made for the best gaming experiences I have had thus far.