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Dimthar
08-11-2007, 10:37 PM
While surfing through Garland, TX library catalog, I searched for one of my favorite adventure authors: Emilio Salgari.

To my surprise there were ZERO of his books listed. I was looking for the Black Corsair Series.

In wikipedia I found that only 4 of his stories have been translated to English (He was an italian writer).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emilio_Salgari

This may be a possible reason on why he is not as famous in US as I thought he would be (when I was 10-13 I read in spanish the whole Sandokan Series, and his Wild West Series).

I still remember with nostalgia when Sandokan mounts machine guns in the back of elephants to reconquer his friend land in India.

Anyway, since I dream to run one day a Pirate campaign, could you please list your favorite novels?

Grimwell
08-12-2007, 02:08 PM
Treasure Island, by Robert Lewis Stephenson

In terms of literature and 'classics' this is the English language classic pirates book. Real world inspiration for your campaign.

fmitchell
08-12-2007, 04:01 PM
There's also Captain Blood, by Rafael Sabatini.

I was kind of dismayed to find out it was written in 1922, because in the book "negroes" were invariably an anonymous horde of mooks sent after the hero. I would have guessed it was written in the late 1700s or early 1800s.

Despite that caveat, though, it's a classic adventure story of a gentleman who becomes a slave, and then a pirate.

fmitchell
08-12-2007, 04:05 PM
Oh, and if you want a fantasy/horror treatment of pirates, read On Stranger Tides (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/On_Stranger_Tides) by Tim Powers. It's a little obscure, but nobody blends historical fact, folklore, and pure weirdness like Tim Powers.

Malruhn
11-24-2007, 11:45 PM
Remember that most pirates started their piratical life as a privateer. Privateers were pirates with a country flag on their vessels, and were chartered as contractors (read: mercenaries) to either stop other nations or to stop illegal pirates.

Even the USA had privateers that worked for us during the Revolutionary War, the Quasi-war with France, and even the War of 1812.

After the Revolutionary War, most of the current privateers were let go... leaving them with a ship, weapons, experience - and no jobs. Many of them ran the Jolly Roger up the mast and became pirates. To combat this, the US created the Revenue Cutter Service, which eventually was morphed into the US Coast Guard. (And this ends today's history lesson and shameless plug for my chosen employer).

Digital Arcanist
11-25-2007, 01:10 AM
Remember that most pirates started their piratical life as a privateer. Privateers were pirates with a country flag on their vessels, and were chartered as contractors (read: mercenaries) to either stop other nations or to stop illegal pirates.

Even the USA had privateers that worked for us during the Revolutionary War, the Quasi-war with France, and even the War of 1812.

After the Revolutionary War, most of the current privateers were let go... leaving them with a ship, weapons, experience - and no jobs. Many of them ran the Jolly Roger up the mast and became pirates. To combat this, the US created the Revenue Cutter Service, which eventually was morphed into the US Coast Guard. (And this ends today's history lesson and shameless plug for my chosen employer).

You're a pirate?:eek: Ninjas are way cooler than you!!!:p


The Coast Guard aren't doing very well these days in my area. The tanker spill in San Francisco is really killing their approval rating.:(

gdmcbride
11-27-2007, 03:13 AM
In terms of recent novels, I've heard good things about Wilbur Smith's "Birds of Prey". I haven't read it yet so I can't vouch for it, but I did really love "River God" and "Warlock" by the same author even though they are set in a completely different period (Ancient Egypt).

It's on my list. I have a soft spot in my heart after all for pirates.

Gary

kipling
02-18-2008, 08:53 AM
Seconded for "On Stranger Tides" (although you really can't go wrong with any Tim Powers stuff after Deviant Palace).

There are a number of excellent Sabatini novels, Captain Blood has already been mentioned.

For non-fiction, "Under the Black Flag" by Cordingley (I think) is good.

boulet
02-18-2008, 09:22 AM
Oh, and if you want a fantasy/horror treatment of pirates, read On Stranger Tides (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/On_Stranger_Tides) by Tim Powers. It's a little obscure, but nobody blends historical fact, folklore, and pure weirdness like Tim Powers.Yum yum, had really a great time with Tim Powers, not just this one.

By the way there is an extremely well done and documented pirate RPG available on the web... Only trouble it's in French :D If you're curious though it's Pavillon Noir (http://pavillonnoir.free.fr/download/downloads.html). For instance there's a 16Mb pdf file full of ships description.

tesral
02-18-2008, 09:15 PM
You're a pirate?:eek: Ninjas are way cooler than you!!!:p

Avast ye lubber, I'll scuttle yer scurvy bones to the bottom o' Davy Jones' locker I will. Pirates be way cooler than ninjas! Pirates know how to PARTY!

I know more pirate movies than books these here days.

kipling
02-19-2008, 11:55 AM
Oh, well, if you're going to allow RPGs as well, there's a nice setting by Green Ronin called Skull & Bones, which is not historically accurate (it has magic) but is for D&D 3.0.

Precis Intermedia Games has one called Bloode Island, which is pretty good. Both are set in the Golden Age of Piracy (about 1680-1730).

There's an article in German for doing pirates in CoC.

I have another one kicking around, but I can't recall the name at the moment.