PDA

View Full Version : Evil Characters/Game



Moritz
08-02-2007, 05:42 PM
A year back I ran a short lived Evil D&D game. Where all of the players took characters that were Neutral Evil, Neutral, Lawful Evil, or Lawful Neutral.

Ya know how when you're in a good aligned group and one of you falls down, the others generally give you healing potions or cast spells.

Well, in an evil game, when a character falls down, he or she is likely to die.

I'd never seen so much death and rewriting of characters in my gaming life.

Anyone else have experiences in the evil alignment?

rabkala
08-02-2007, 07:27 PM
I have run and played in numerous evil campaigns. They can be a lot of fun, refreshing even. Depending on the level of roleplaying and character identification in your group, it can be taxing.

The trick to running an evil campaign is to keep the world darker than the characters that inhabit it. Not only do they have to worry about the good guys, they have to worry about every other evil genius with a plan. Do not set up a world for them to happily walk through raping and torturing every innocent farm boy they meet.

Just as a paladin doesn't have to be 'Lawful Stupid', evil characters do not have to played 'Evil Stupid'. Evil can work together for a common goal. Evil can work together in the interest of their mutual survival. In the real world, evil is not so black and white. People who do evil things are not monsters who have no love for others.

Ed Zachary
08-02-2007, 07:35 PM
Anyone else have experiences in the evil alignment?

Our evil characters have all been greedy, selfish, nasty and without conscience.

But what made the group cohesive is we realized that we could get richer and more powerful if we worked together against common foes while adventuring.

But outside the adventure we worked and plotted against each others' interests. No DM could be a cruel as one player going after another.

Moritz
08-02-2007, 07:43 PM
I love it when the players go after one another. I don't have to do jack, just sit back with popcorn and watch them go at one another.

bitemytail
08-02-2007, 07:55 PM
I love it when the players go after one another. I don't have to do jack, just sit back with popcorn and watch them go at one another.

I played a necromancer in a group with a paladin. It made children cry.

Moritz
08-02-2007, 07:59 PM
I played a necromancer in a group with a paladin. It made children cry.

How in the world did the Paladin not kill the Necro every time there was a summoning? Or heck, just kill him for being the abomination he was :)

bitemytail
08-03-2007, 07:45 PM
How in the world did the Paladin not kill the Necro every time there was a summoning? Or heck, just kill him for being the abomination he was :)

My Necromancer wasn't evil. He knew that but the Pally still hated me with all his might. He almost cried when I was voted group leader (a position I didn't want)

rabkala
08-03-2007, 10:18 PM
I started as a thief in a party with a paladin. Slowly I darkened as I prestiged into spymaster to get the permanent undetectable alignment. Then into assassin as I killed off all sorts of NPC's and framed the paladin. So sweet!

Moritz
08-06-2007, 08:39 AM
I started as a thief in a party with a paladin. Slowly I darkened as I prestiged into spymaster to get the permanent undetectable alignment. Then into assassin as I killed off all sorts of NPC's and framed the paladin. So sweet!

Oh, that is just so rude! LOL

TheYeti1775
08-06-2007, 09:51 AM
Had an evil campaign one time.
Fear kept them together, and working together.
I had a Paladin hunting them, constantly.

In actuality, the Paladin, was simply a Fighter that was a ruthless bounty hunter looking for them for the reward. He had won the Full Plate in a battle with a Paladin who had been framed. So he looked the part of a Paladin bent on revenge. Managed to have about 10/11 sessions before they got tired of running and set an ambush. :D

Generally though, I don't do evil campaigns. Though I have been interested in playing an evil character from time to time.

starfalconkd
08-06-2007, 10:00 AM
Evil campaigns work as long as the characters have a reason to cooperate. Once they lose that reason, they start planning to kill each other. It works better when you have players who can handle it maturely and don't slit each others throats because they just feel like it.

Ed Zachary
08-06-2007, 10:48 AM
Evil campaigns work as long as the characters have a reason to cooperate. Once they lose that reason, they start planning to kill each other. It works better when you have players who can handle it maturely and don't slit each others throats because they just feel like it.

Greed.

They steal more gold as an entity then they could individually.

Moritz
08-06-2007, 10:56 AM
Yeah, but after they steal the gold as a group, there's often one or all of them that wants it for themselves and cannot see the future goals. Instant gratification.

TheYeti1775
08-06-2007, 11:05 AM
Evil campaigns are hard to pull off for anyone without a single overwhelming need for them to band together. Though remember nothing is stopping them from being a group of friends, and going adventuring together raiding tombs. They would be less prone to worry about Johnny Law if they are raiding a high paladin's tomb or a Lich's.

Ed Zachary
08-06-2007, 11:11 AM
Yeah, but after they steal the gold as a group, there's often one or all of them that wants it for themselves and cannot see the future goals. Instant gratification.

I posted this elsewhere a long time ago, but it fits here so I'm going to repost it...


Evil Moment #1: One guy newer to DMing set a campaign where our characters (N & E) were to rescue some royal, and we would get treasure for it. One character asked to see the treasure, and pulled a Contingency/teleport with all of it. I had never seen a look of surprise/shock on the face of a DM as I did that moment. The rest of us still demanded treasure to perform the rescue, but the king had nothing left. Unhappy about being summoned for nothing, we spent the rest of the gaming session trashing and looting the city.


Evil Moment #2: We were on a time sensitive mission, and the DM tempted us with a dragon's cave. While the dragon chased us, my priest sent an aerial servant to take some treasure from the dragon's lair. We ditched the dragon, and later on some treasure came magically floating to me. Greedy Steve went invisible, and we guessed that he wanted some loot too. After spending the next day without seeing Steve's character, a new character joined our group (run by Steve).


Evil Moment #3: Steve's character and mine were rivals (we always were), and his wizard/assassin planned to assassinate an ally of my wizard/assassin. I waited hidden in a bar where my ally hid out, and finally spotted invisible Steve. After Steve killed my ally, I magic missiled him before he could teleport out. His spell failed and he had to fight his way out. That led to a huge bounty being placed on his head, and he had to live in hiding. I was a hero. Steve was so pissed at that moment, you could see the smoke.


Evil Moment #4: Steve and I were also good friends. Our party had fought a battle against many giants. Steve and I killed our giants and escaped to protected ground. Dave, who's fighter had been greedy and cowardly was still fighting the remainders. When he was almost victorious, we started casting cure and protective spells on the giants. Dave's character survived, but he learned a lesson in getting caught not putting the group first.

Skylon
08-06-2007, 11:38 AM
I've never ran or took part in an evil campaign but I've certainly (and preferably) run and played in morally ambiguous ones. Games where there is no black or white, just varying shades of gray. The perceived good and the actual good might be polar opposites. Doing something supposedly evil might serve a greater good (greater good...). The great religious leader who sends your group out on a quest to find a holy artifact has intentions of destroying it. That assassin you helped apprehend is actually a member of a secret society charged with protecting the land from a corrupt leader.

TheYeti1775
08-06-2007, 11:48 AM
Definetely had my share of "morally ambiguous ones" games.

Moritz
08-06-2007, 12:48 PM
There was a game once (non D&D) where the GM told me that I had been tainted by some evil influence. It was a solo campaign and those few months of playing were like.... indescribable. Suffice it to say it rocked. But, got old eventually.

Argent
08-14-2007, 12:22 PM
Never really enjoyed evil campaigns, so never played/ran one. But I seem to be the exception and not the rule. :)

Moritz
08-14-2007, 02:25 PM
In a world where all the 13 year old punk kids who's mommy and daddy use WoW as a babysitter, we find many of them favoring the Horde side of the game because they can be 'evil'. When it's just a free pass for them to act out and be little turds.

Ed Zachary
08-14-2007, 05:10 PM
In a world where all the 13 year old punk kids who's mommy and daddy use WoW as a babysitter, we find many of them favoring the Horde side of the game because they can be 'evil'. When it's just a free pass for them to act out and be little turds.

Solution... do not game with 13 year old punk kids.

spotlight
08-14-2007, 05:13 PM
I have never run an evil campaigne, but I played in one. My character was a doppleganger. It was fun going around like an assasin and changing shape from day to day. It kept the other players confused for a while, thinking they had lots of strange friends, one at a time.

The game came to a rough end when the GM decided to have us try and destroy the local vampire lord.

What's with his abbility to summon demons? And us with few majic swords or other items? REDO!!! REDO!!!

ajmuszkiewicz
08-14-2007, 10:14 PM
In one of my last campaigns, I allowed certain players to play evil characters. The campaign had three separate parties, where each player played a character in each party. Although the party that stuck together the best (as well as was the most successful) was the party without any evil PCs, the evil PCs were easily some of the most memorable. Sure, they can throw a monkeywrench in party dynamics, but, if played right, can really pay off in the end. As usual, anything remotely like this requires a lot of communication between the player and DM to be correctly pulled off.

As far as my playing experience goes, I don't think I've ever actually played one, but I've played enough "morally ambiguous" characters that the other players thought were evil. These have always been some of my most favorite characters because I insist on playing them as a member of the party, rather than as just some dude who's there just to "get his" and anything else be damned.

It seems like there is a lot of latitude for players who want to play evil characters play them and still contribute to the party in a positive way. Batman, ruthless and merciless as he can be, is still part of the Justice League, you know?

Ed Zachary
08-15-2007, 07:25 AM
Evil characters need not be monsters, just greedy with an ends justify the means attitude.

Moritz
08-15-2007, 07:32 AM
Solution... do not game with 13 year old punk kids.

Oh, well there's that.

Funny thing about it. When we're in LFG or LFM (looking for more) mode, we often ask what the player's age is before inviting him/her/it.

Ed Zachary
08-15-2007, 07:52 AM
Oh, well there's that.

Funny thing about it. When we're in LFG or LFM (looking for more) mode, we often ask what the player's age is before inviting him/her/it.

True for an on-line game. But in real life we have the luxury of screening people out on sight.

I've only played once at a game shop in a game that had an open invitation to anyone. It was horrible, never again. Out of eight players, two were the 13 year old punks you described, and another was a guy in his 20s with an IQ of 50 who was affectionately referred to as "Speed Bump".

Moritz
08-15-2007, 07:57 AM
I've only played once at a game shop in a game that had an open invitation to anyone. It was horrible, never again. Out of eight players, two were the 13 year old punks you described, and another was a guy in his 20s with an IQ of 50 who was affectionately referred to as "Speed Bump".

Dude, I'm so opposed to that medium that it sort of makes me throw up a little. I haven't, nor will I ever run a game for an 'open invitation' setting.

rabkala
08-16-2007, 10:21 PM
True for an on-line game. But in real life we have the luxury of screening people out on sight.

I've only played once at a game shop in a game that had an open invitation to anyone. It was horrible, never again. Out of eight players, two were the 13 year old punks you described, and another was a guy in his 20s with an IQ of 50 who was affectionately referred to as "Speed Bump".

I ran an open game in a shop for a couple of years. Some days were much better than others. It usually was more hack and slash than I normally play, and almost needs to be with a revolving door. If a player showed promise or seemed like a decent person, I would invite them to one of my regular games. I did get many Magic/ card players, video game types, and fresh kids. I often had to tell myself I was giving back to the game I loved. I don't know if it did help the game spread or prosper, but I did come away with 4 friends/players to inject new life in my old groups.