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DMMike
09-02-2014, 12:17 PM
I'm hijacking my own thread from:

Please tell me:


What are your three favorite ideas found in fantasy literature?
What are the coolest fantasy game rules you've seen or used?
What are the fantasy ideas that you've always wanted to see in an RPG?


to:

Rules module: Amulet.

Synopsis:
Amulet is a rules module for Modos RPG. In it, players fight hordes of faceless monsters in a race for glory, survival, and gold. The module is designed to be run without a GM if desired, and to create on-the-fly dungeons for game groups who want to do lots of fighting with minimal preparation. Optional rules expand the possibilities to include evolving monsters, boss monsters, and objectives beyond earning the most treasure.

Malruhn
09-03-2014, 08:56 PM
1. Three fav ideas:
--The reluctant hero - which is VERY hard to do to make it seem "fresh."
--A new twist to magic (Blake Charlton's "Spellwright" series did this VERY well), OR, sticking to RAW for a favorite RPG system (ooh, look, three magic missiles, that mage is fifth or sixth level!)
--STRONG female characters that aren't dicks. It's great to have a strong female, but when they rub their gender in your face, it ticks me off. What they did with Arwen in the Lord of the Rings movies did that well - and even Eowyn was well done. Strong, female, and they didn't say, "Look what my bewbs let me do!!" (okay, they kinda did it with Eowyn, but that was a plot device.

2. Coolest rules: Sorry, I'm a stick in the mud. I like D&D (Pathfinder, now) with all the warts and scars.

3. Wants: A damned good story. If I'm buying a campaign world off the rack, I want logic and I want physics that works. I want a history so I know if I plot PC's down somewhere and somewhen, they (and I) know that they are part of a living, breathing world. I don't want ANY unkillable heroes or villains. It pisses me off to see a Gandalf or an Elminster, or a Drizzt that is so important to the world that they can't be killed. I want THOUGHT put into the ecosystems used. If an owlbear lives outside of town, why the hell haven't the villagers armed up and gone en masse to kill the beastie? If a pack of hell-hounds are running through the forest, why the hell hasn't it burned down yet?? This harkens back to the days of yore, when 30 orcs would be in that 10'x10' room and LIVING in there... with a room right down the hall with a manticore, and another with a mind flayer... why didn't they kill each other? Why didn't they work together??

I don't know if this is what you were looking for, but there it is. Rip it apart and/or use it as you wish. The only "credit" I want is a fun module when you are done - and I'll even pay market prices for it!! If it's REALLY popular and you get rich, maybe a PM that says, "Thank you," would be wonderful. :)

DMMike
09-04-2014, 09:54 PM
Totally what I'm looking for - and fun is totally the goal. No market prices though - this is another donation to the community. Although that reminds me of another one I was working on before - a Gauntlet simulator called Amulet - which might overtake this project depending on the ideas I get.

RE Malruhn's 3:
1. The reluctant hero could either be a character class, or part of a background system - I could probably do either.
A new twist to magic could be a class as well (since Modos uses abstract magic rules), but I'll check into Spellwright...
Female characters - might be out of the scope of the module. Or another character class.

2. So...what are your favorite Pathfinder rules?

3. What you describe is very much part of my story world...but that's a different product, and probably won't be free!

DMMike
09-05-2014, 04:37 PM
So, um, I just made a huge project out of this. And I'm soliciting help, for ideas if nothing else.

This is Project Amulet. It will be a self-generating dungeon crawl. Probably GM-less. Fast, Furious, and Fun, but it's not Savage Worlds.

It's based on the classic arcade game Gauntlet and my new game, Modos RPG. The purpose of the game is to get as deep into the gauntlet as possible, and hold the record amount of treasure at your game table. So, meet friends, shoot weapons, and have a fun time with minimal preparation.

I'm already drawing up rules for:
- Random dungeon level generation
- Fast, Gauntlet-like encounters
- Dungeon puzzles like how to escape Death, or whether you should release a trapped swarm
- Overlapping RPG rules to add more roleplaying to the game as desired.

The game will need rules/ideas for areas such as:
- Character level advancement
- Increasing dungeon level difficulty
- Random creatures, treasure, boons, and banes to be found
- End bosses!
- Adding complexity to the random dungeon generator.

And yes, I've still included some ideas for Malruhn:
- Reluctant heroes, but probably not very fresh. Who wants to get thrown into an endless dungeon?
- New magic twist: being a Good race and drinking a potion results in a momentary Destroy Evil aura, depending on your character's magic skill. Okay, not exactly "new"...
- the Valkyrie. Strong enough?

DMMike
09-06-2014, 10:40 AM
Here's a draft outline. I'm looking for things that need rearranging, embellishment, inclusion, or removal.




Synopsis
Introduction & Story
Characters
[*=1]Magic Power
[*=1] Classes
[*=1]Generic
Dungeons
[*=1]Meta

The countdown
Tokens/credits
Game announcements (earn hero points)





GM-less play
Creation

Who Generates
Room Number (limit)
Room Size

1, 2, 3, 4 units



Room Shape

Square
Rectangle
Hallway
Triangle
Circle



Exits

Number
Location
Type



Room Contents

Encounters
Magic Keys
Wards (can make walls disappear)
Food
Treasure
Password Segments



Special Dungeons

Password Dungeons
Treasure Dungeons









Encounters

Monsters

Individuals

New stats?
Behavior



Swarms

Swarm stats
Swarm creation
Swarm behavior/decisions






Generators
Scaling
Locks – Unlocking without magic keys
Puzzles

Trapped Swarms/Generators
Murder holes (time puzzle)
Teleporters (pulling swarms)
Resource allocation (keys, potions, food)
Multiple Exits
Sacrifice
Sub-rooms






Combat

Take half
No initiative
No reloading
Act during turn only
Auto defenses
Maneuver

Flanking
Fleeing
Sneaking
Damage

Mass damage
Mass protection









Rules (codified)

DMMike
09-07-2014, 04:49 PM
Draft intro section:

A disembodied voice speaks in the darkness. “You are such a great hero. When I came to you, singing your praises, fawning for your attention, you didn’t even blink. Because you knew that your achievements were glorious. You had no humility. So you took my amulet, and wore it with pride.” The voice chuckles. “And now…now you are my prisoner. Your treasure, the amulet, is now your tomb! Do not cast it aside, for it sustains your life here.”

Where is “here?” You open your eyes. You lie in an empty, dark cell, with other bodies nearby. Torches light the walls and cast thick smoke across the ceiling, casting a sickly glow all about. When you remove the amulet, your eyes burn, your lungs burn, and the world narrows before you. You place the amulet back around your neck, and stand up.

“Yes, mortal,” resumes the voice, “it is only foul air that burns continuously in a deep dungeon. And my foul magic allows you to breathe this air, for a time. Come to me, deeper into my dungeon, and your flame will continue to burn.”
You stand up, and hear the familiar rattle of your tools of war. Feeling a certain amount of defeat, you drop your weapon, but there is no sound. Your weapon is once again in your hand. It is a magical gift, it seems, and another gift – the bodies near you are your comrades. They live yet, and stand. It’s time to find a way out.

Welcome to Amulet. This is a rules module for Modos RPG, designed to run you and your friends through countless levels of dark dungeon traps, monsters, and puzzles. On the way, you’ll search for secrets, make nick-of-time decisions, and collect gobs of treasure.

This module is divided into five sections. The first is for the characters that will be running the gauntlet. The second is for the dungeon itself: how to make it, fill it, and run it. Then you’ll find guidance on encounters, or what creatures and situations the characters will meet as they explore the dungeon. The next chapter explains the special combat rules used to speed up play against hordes of monsters. Finally, the new rules are laid out in catalog format for integration into the Modos RPG rules.

DMMike
09-10-2014, 10:42 PM
Characters

A game of Amulet can be run with just one player, but as with most dungeons, there is safety in numbers. This section tells you everything you need to know about the magical amulets worn by each character, how to make characters, and how to convert core rules Modos RPG characters to Amulet characters.

Amulets

The heroes of the game have each been kidnapped by the power of a magical amulet, which each character must wear around his neck or die from the noxious gasses filling the dungeon. While it is likely that wearing the amulet gives the master of the dungeon power over the characters, the amulet grants some beneficial properties as well.

HEALTH – each character has 100 health points. The toxic nature of the dungeon causes this health to diminish at a fast rate, discussed in the Dungeon – Meta-dungeon section. Characters regain health by consuming enchanted food, descending to lower dungeon levels, and spending tokens.

MAGICAL WEAPONS – each character has a primary missile weapon that magically returns to his hand once it hits something. Magic users can continuously fire spells in this way, without limit. The character’s close-combat weapon functions normally.

MAGIC POWER – each character has an inherent magical ability that is augmented by the amulet. This allows magic users to fire one spell continuously, and enables all characters to destroy a certain amount of nearby enemies when consuming special potions found throughout the dungeon.

(Classes are next. What Gauntlet classes would you like to see beyond the Warrior, Valkyrie, Wizard, and Elf?)

Matt James
09-11-2014, 04:23 PM
I love this thread. Keep it up.

DMMike
09-12-2014, 10:34 AM
Classes

The heroes of the game find themselves in the mysterious dungeon with only a portion of their normal gear, so they must rely first on their combat and magic skills to survive. The following classes describe the beginning powers and gear of each character. When characters gain level points (awarded by the GM), a die amount (d#) increases by one die type, or a number increases by one. For example, if the warrior gained two level points, he could increase his melee to d12, and his armor to 4. An attribute at d12 adds a bonus to the d12 for each level point, starting at d12+1.

WARRIOR – the Warrior holds one virtue above all others, valor, and defends that virtue with one attribute, strength. In fact, he doesn’t wear armor, which helps him to put his strength on display. His uses a battle axe to dispatch foes.
Melee d10
Speed 3
Shot d8
Armor 3
Magic d6

ELF – a fearsome hunter who never misses his mark, the Elf slays foes from afar with his elven bow. He is fleet-footed, which ensures that no prey can escape his eagle eye, or his arrows.
Melee d6
Speed 4
Shot d8
Armor 3
Magic d8

VALKYRIE – trained as an elite guardsman, the Valkyrie is deadly with her sword. She follows a code of honor that requires her to defend her fellow soldiers, and she defends herself with a suit of heavy armor and a shield.
Melee d8
Speed 3
Shot d6
Armor 5
Magic d6

WIZARD – the Wizard is a keeper of arcane knowledge. One whisper from his mouth creates a searing flame, which he delivers to destroy his foes. He needs neither sword nor shield, but uses magical potions to great effect.
Melee d6
Speed 3
Shot d8
Armor 3
Magic d10


Conversion

The Modos RPG rules contain a more robust system for creating and interpreting your character. If you want to use your favorite Modos character in Amulet, it’s easy to quickly derive his numbers. After that, you’ll find an explanation of how to use other elements of your character – like his larceny or sneaking skills – or include these skills in a standard Amulet character.

GENERATING AMULET NUMBERS – Your Modos character will need a new set of five abilities: Armor, Magic, Melee, Shot, and Speed. Some of these terms have other meanings and uses, so keep them separate from your other elements. You’ll also have a health count of 100, which is similar to your physical damage pool, but you’ll see later that it’s easier just to track health on dice.
The first step in converting the numbers is to establish your points in each ability. For Armor, give your character one point for every point he has in his total defend-parry bonus. Then, assign him one armor point for each die type above d4 that his protection represents. For example, a d4 would be 1 point, a d6 would be 2 points, and a d8+1 would be 3 points.
For Magic, give your character a point for his total, highest, cast spell bonus. Then assign another point for each die type of damage dealt by this spell.
For Melee, give your character a point for his total fight-melee or fight-unarmed bonus, whichever is higher. Then assign another point for each damage die type of his primary weapon.
For Shot, give your character a point for each point in his total fight-missile bonus. Assign another point for each die type of damage dealt by his missile weapon. If your character primarily casts damaging spells at range, use the Magic calculation for Shot instead.
For Speed, give your character a point for each point in his total movement bonus. Assign an additional point for each movement-related perk he has.
Once each ability has a total, arrange them in descending order, and assign them brand-new scores in this order: 4, 3, 3, 2, 2. Since the conversion process is a guideline, you may swap two consecutive abilities before assigning the scores. At the GM’s discretion, you may add one additional point to any ability per character level above 2.

USING ADDITIONAL ELEMENTS – Let’s say your Modos character has all sorts of cool abilities, for example, larceny, healing spells, and some really flavorful uses for his hero points. You can still use these in a game of Amulet! Most of these things behave the same way that they do in a standard Modos game. The main difference is that time is all-important in Amulet. The GM cannot use one-roll conflicts, because these neglect tracking the time involved to accomplish something. Whenever characters do something in Amulet, everyone takes all actions at the same time, so if you want to cast a four-action spell (4th level), or spend several rounds picking a lock, the other characters should also be given the opportunity to act. Otherwise, they will be watching their lives dwindle, due to the Countdown, while you perform something time-consuming.

DMMike
09-13-2014, 09:58 AM
Here are the basic dungeon-generation tables. Note that tables beginning on 2 use two dice to generate a result, and the Exit Type table uses 3d4.




Size
Shape
Exit-Loc
Exit-Typ
Exit-Num
Contents
SwSize (health)
Enc
Monstr


1
1
Square
North

1

1




2
2
Rectangle
South

2
Password
25%
Wraith
Wizard


3
3
Hallway
East
Exit
3
Roll 2
50%
None
Demon


4
4
Triangle
West
Crumble
4
Special
75%
Roll 2
Barbn


5
5
Circle
GM
Secret

Potion
100%
Gen
Ghost


6
GM
GM
GM
Walldoor

MurdHol
GM
Swarm
Lobber


7



Open

Key

Mimic
Slime


8



Door

Treasure

GM
GM


9



Food

None





10



Treasure

Food





11



Teleport

Ale





12



GM

Poison





13





Ward





14





Trap





15





Roll 3





16





GM






Key:
Exit-Loc = Cardinal direction of an exit
Exit-Typ = Type of exit
Exit-Num = Number of exits from a room
SwSize = Swarm size, measured in percentage of the room's max swarm capacity
Enc = Encounter (every room has an encounter, and a Contents)
Gen = Monster generator
Barbn = Barbarian
MurdHol = Murder hole, window on another room
WallDoor = An entire wall that can be unlocked and opened
GM = GM's choice

DMMike
09-14-2014, 12:20 PM
Beginning work on the Dungeon section. But here's the party-game part:

GAME ANNOUNCEMENTS – some events in the game are so important that they must be announced by an otherworldly, god-like, or dungeon master-like voice. These game announcements can be made by anyone besides the PC who caused the event, but must be made loudly and in the lowest pitch possible. Being the first to initiate a game announcement earns the player performing it one token. Tokens cannot be awarded for multiple announcements of the same cause, like a character repeatedly trying to take a key when his inventory is full. Game announcements take the following formats, with variable portions in [brackets].

“Shots do not hurt other players – yet.” Occurs only once per game, on the first instance when a character would take damage from friendly fire. When the PCs descend a dungeon level after hearing this announcement, the friendly fire rule takes effect.

“You are full of bombs and/or keys.” Characters can carry a combination of only 12 potions and keys. When a character tries to take a 13th item, another player may make this announcement.

“Remember, don’t shoot food!” Occurs only once per game, on the first instance of a character shooting food. This will normally happen to open a ward which has monsters on the other side.

“[Class] shot the food!” Occurs on the subsequent instances of food being shot. Food can be destroyed by accident if it is in a swarm, or intentionally if it acts as a door.

“I’ve not seen such bravery!” Occurs on the first instance of all generators and all monsters being destroyed on a dungeon level. Also occurs when PCs defeat a mini-boss (see Scaling).

“Let’s see you get out of here!” When the PCs enter a new room, facing a 100% swarm, and the previous room contains a swarm of at least 50% strength.

“[Class], your life force is running out.” Occurs when a character’s health reaches 50.

“[Class] needs food, badly!” Occurs when a character’s health reaches 25.

“[Class] is about to die!” Occurs when a character’s health reaches 10.

“Save keys to open doors.” Announced when a character collects the 5th key of the game.

Malruhn
09-14-2014, 04:02 PM
So are you going to credit the Gauntlet video game for your "original concept"??

I can see a cease and desist order in your future.

DMMike
09-14-2014, 07:47 PM
Did I say "original concept?" Hope not. Anyway, they're welcome to send me letters for something I'm not selling. I'll plead the 1st.

Malruhn
09-14-2014, 08:25 PM
You win the internet for at least an hour, today. I've used "plead the First" for years"!! Hey, if I have the freedom of speech, I have the freedom to keep my mouth shut - and, besides, the Fifth just makes you SOUND guilty!!

DMMike
09-16-2014, 12:59 PM
Creation

Dungeons in Amulet are created one room at a time, and any given room can, through the process of random generation, reveal itself to actually be part of another, larger room. The following rules apply to creating the dungeon levels as you go. Roll 2d8 to find table results.

THE MAPPER – Generating each room is the responsibility of the GM, or the mapper in a GM-less game. The mapper’s job is to quickly roll on each dungeon-generation table, and once the size, shape, and exits of a room are determined, to orient the room and draw it on a map that all players can see. The size of this map isn’t as important as the ability of all players to understand what all symbols on the map mean.

LEVEL SIZE – As a rule of thumb, all dungeon levels in Amulet should be about the same size. You can establish what this size is by using the first level as a template for all following levels, or by declaring that each level will be approximately X units (see Room Size) square. The size of your map might be a practical determinant of X; if you’re playing an objective that requires going back through previous levels, you’ll want to have room to leave previous levels on your map! Note that there must be a maximum level size, because the final room drawn – the one that fills the last available space before exceeding Level Size – must contain a Stair if there are no other Stairs on that level.

ROOM SIZE – The first roll in dungeon generation is Room Size. This determines the maximum dimension, in units, of the room that you’re generating. The first room in a level can be of any size. However, each additional room must not exceed the maximum dimension available on the map. If a generated room size cannot fit between existing rooms or within the Level Size, that room’s size must be reduced to what will fit. A “unit” is the minimum wall length, and can be considered about 10 feet. Angular walls, those at 45 degree angles to standard walls, are a bit longer. The room size is also a multiplier used in determining the maximum health of a swarm filling a given room. “GM” stands for “GM’s choice.”



Roll
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16


Result
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
GM



ROOM SHAPE – There are five random room shapes. The opening of special doors, or walls that turn out to be made of treasure (see Exit Types), can create larger, more interesting rooms. However, each room starts small. The mapper may decide the orientation of each new room, but the room must share at least one side with the previous room. Room orientations must occur within 45 degree intervals, i.e. no room walls may be drawn at an angle that is not evenly divisible by 45. A Hallway drawn at 45 degrees may be cropped at either end to connect with other rooms.


Square: all sides of this room equal the Room Size.

Rectangle: the longer sides of this room equal the Room Size. The shorter sides must be less than the Room Size, but more than one unit, if possible.

Hallway: the longer sides of this room equal Room Size, while the shorter sides equal one unit.

Triangle: the hypotenuse of this room equals Room Size. All Triangle rooms must have one vertical and one horizontal wall.

Circle: the diameter of this room equals Room Size. This room may be drawn smoothly, or with walls



Roll

2

3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16


Result
Sq

Re
Ha
Tr
Ci
Sq
Re
Ha
Ti
Ci
Sq
Re
Ha
Tr
GM


Sq=Square, Re=Rectangle, Ha=Hallway, Tr=Triangle, Ci=Circle, GM=GM’s choice

EXITS – Determining the exits from a new room requires three steps: finding the number, location, and type of exits.

Number of exits: a room can have 1-4 exits. Rooms with 1 exit are only accessible via the route that the PCs used to enter them. Rooms with 1 exit, when they were accessed by a secret door, only contain a number of treasures equal to Room Size. If a room cannot accommodate all the exits rolled, the GM may place a teleporter or Stair instead.

Location of exits: the first exit is in the position first used to access the room. The remaining exits are located (or just are) in the cardinal directions rolled. If an exit turns out to be impossible after the location and type are determined (like rolling two exits on a one-unit wall), make it a teleporter. If two such exits are impossible, add a Stair to the room instead. When a side of the room is at 45 degrees, that wall can take exits for two cardinal directions, like west and south. When the room being generated shares a wall with another room, and the previous wall had no exit (or an undiscovered secret exit), then an exit generated in that wall for the new room will represent a secret exit. When the previous wall had an exit, one of the exits generated for the new room must be located here.

Type of exits: several types of exits are possible, and some serve to make smaller rooms into effectively larger rooms.


Stair: this exit leads to the next lower dungeon level. The torches of the lower level ignite when all PCs have arrived, and each PC gains 10 bonus health at this time as well from the slightly fresher air. Unfortunately, the soot from the lower torches rises up to the previous dungeon level, making survival on the previous level quite impossible.

Crumble: a dungeon wall that is ready to collapse. Three actions of attacks (three from one character, or three simultaneous attacks from different characters) are required to destroy a crumbling wall, which is always one unit wide. Mark a Crumble by drawing the wall as a wavy line.

Secret: this exit’s location cannot be determined during room generation. Characters must use Speed contests (or search actions like detect skill or appropriate professions or knowledges when using core rules) on each wall to find a secret door. Roll +0 for the opposing contest, or use the Dungeon Level as a bonus if you’re Scaling the dungeon. The first PC to beat the opposition finds the secret door in the location he chose to search. Secret doors are usually one unit wide. Each contest requires one action. Mark a secret door, once it has been found, by writing an S across the line.

Walldoor: some keys open more than a small portal. When you place a magic key in a walldoor’s lock, two or more units of wall sink into the ground. If a walldoor’s length is greater than the Room Size of the next room behind it, then the remaining portion of walldoor leads to yet another room. For example, a character opens a 4-unit walldoor. Generating the next room, you find that the Room Size is only 3. Since the new room cannot close the entire gap behind the walldoor, you must generate a second room to fill the remaining unit of walldoor. Mark a Walldoor by writing a C across its segment. Once the Walldoor is open, turn the C into an O.

Door: a standard door opens with a magic key and measures one unit. Mark a Door with a C, and once it is open, an O.

Open: an opening into another room that measures one or more units. Open exits have a nasty habit of hiding more swarms. If characters do not immediately investigate an open area (requiring room generation), the next room’s Size and Encounter should be rolled as a minimum to see if any monsters will want to attack. Mark an open exit with an O.

Food: this is a one-unit opening into another room, filled with a food-ward (see Room Contents). Mark a food-ward with two ticks (forming an F). Once the ward disappears, connect the two ticks into an O.

Treasure: some walls are made entirely of treasure-wards (see Room Contents). The GM may determine this wall’s size, from 1 unit to the full length of the wall. Mark Treasure wall segments with one tick in each unit. When someone collects that Treasure, form it into an O.

Teleport: an area in the floor, about three feet in diameter, glows with an eerie blue light. When PCs use a teleporter, pick any area on the map that does not feature a room, or choose an unused teleporter as a destination. If you picked a new area, generate a new room there, with one teleporter as the destination-teleporter. Only the character using the teleporter travels there. Teleporters do not permit monster movement. Mark a Teleporter with a small square inside the room.



Roll
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16


Num
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
2
3
4
1
2
3
GM


Loc
N
S
E
W
N
S
E
W
N
S
E
W
N
S
GM


Type
St
St
Cr
Cr
Se
Wa
Wa
Do
Op
Fo
Fo
Tr
Tr
Te
GM


St=Stair, Cr=Crumble, Se=Secret, Wa=Walldoor, Do=Door, Fo=Food, Tr=Treasure, Te=Teleporter, GM= GM’s choice

CONTENTS – every room has contents, which refers to anything besides monsters. Roll on this table every time a new room has been found. Picking up contents requires one action. See the Combat section for collecting contents when enemies are present.

Password: the room contains a locked chest. The locked chest contains a scroll case. Inside the scroll case is a scroll with some mysterious writing. This writing can be a segment of campaign-related information, a riddle, or part of the ultimate password: the one needed for the characters to break free of the dungeon. The default writing, however, is just a magic word that can be used once to temporarily turn all wall segments into Stairs.

Roll 2: this increases the contents of the room by 1. Roll again.

Special: a Special content is a temporary boon, like Reflective Shot, Repulsiveness, or Teleportability. The group can add any other special contents they like before the game begins. If no Specials are desired, this result becomes a Roll 2. Reflective Shot reduces friendly fire results (1-2 becomes 1, and 1 becomes none). Repulsiveness prevents the character from being swarmed. Teleportability allows the character to teleport across walls, but that character cannot pick up any contents or wards. Each Special lasts 10 actions.

Potion: a magic potion causes a character’s magic power to flash out in a brief aura. Using a potion requires one action. When a character uses a potion, he rolls his Magic die six times to determine how much damage the closest swarm takes. In addition, this same amount of damage applies to the generators in the room. Once one generator takes enough to be destroyed, the remaining damage applies to the next generator. Potions also destroy Wraiths in the room on a one-for-one basis. For example, a room contains one swarm and three generators. A wizard uses a potion, and rolls 6d10, getting a total of 40. The nearest swarm in the room takes 40 damage to its health. Then the 40 damage applies to the generators as well. The first generator takes 10 damage, which is enough to destroy it. The second generator takes 20 damage, enough to destroy it as well. The third generator, which still has 20 health, takes the remaining 10 damage, so it remains with 10 health. Characters may shoot a potion, but shot potions cause only 6d6 damage. Characters may carry a combined maximum of 12 keys and potions.

Murder Hole: this is a hidden window on another room. Murder Holes can be hiding behind anything, but are typically just loose masonry that can be removed to view, and attack, another room. Determine a Murder Hole’s position by rolling on the Exit Location table. Murder Holes cannot share a wall with a room that has already been discovered. Once a Murder Hole has a location, map the room into which it looks as well. Note that opponents in the new room who have Shot attacks can attack through the Murder Hole as well (see Choke Points in the Combat section). If the new room contains a generator, PCs have a 50% chance to have a direct shot on it. A PC with reflective shot has a 75% chance to have a direct shot on the generator.

Key: a magic key has the ability to open any lock. Once it does so, it disappears. Characters may carry a combined maximum of 12 keys and potions.

Treasure: a magical ward fills a 10 foot diameter cylinder. Inside the ward sits an open chest, brimming with riches. The ward prevents monsters and their shots from moving through it. The first character to touch this ward causes it to disappear, and gains 1 treasure point. Each treasure has a 50% chance of also containing a magic key.

None: unfortunately, some rooms have no contents – just a chance of having contents.

Food: a magical ward fills a 10 foot diameter cylinder. Inside the ward sits a plate, spilling over with delicious-looking food. The ward prevents monsters and their shots (but not PC shots) from moving through. A PC shot will destroy the ward and the food. The first character to touch the ward causes it to disappear, and gains 10 health.

Ale: a magical ward fills a 10 foot diameter cylinder. Inside the ward sits a jug. The ward prevents monsters and their shots (but not PC shots) from moving through. A PC shot will destroy the ward and the ale. The first character to touch the ward causes it to disappear, and gains 5 health. When touching the Ale, it has a 25% chance to actually be Poison.

Poison: a magical ward fills a 10 foot diameter cylinder. Inside the ward sits a jug. The ward prevents monsters and their shots (but not PC shots) from moving through. A PC shot will destroy the ward and the poison. The first character to touch the ward causes it to disappear, and loses 5 health. When touching the Poison, it has a 25% chance to actually be Ale.

Ward: a magical ward fills a 10 foot diameter cylinder. The ward is empty. The ward prevents monsters and their shots from moving through. The first character to touch the ward may immediately open any previously discovered Door or Walldoor. A Ward has a 25% chance of actually being a Trap.

Trap: a magical ward fills a 10 foot diameter cylinder. The ward is empty. The ward prevents monsters and their shots from moving through. The first character to touch the ward falls through the illusion of the floor, discovering quicksand instead. You must succeed on a Speed contest to escape the trap. The trap gets +1 to its contest, or Level Bonus if you are Scaling the dungeon. A trap has a 25% chance of actually being a Ward.

Roll 3: this increases the contents of the room by 2. Roll two more times.



Roll
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16


Result
Pa
R2
Sp
Po
Mu
Ke
Tz
No
Fo
Al
Pz
Wa
Tr
R3
GM


Pa=Password, R2=Roll 2, Sp=Special, Po=Potion, Mu=Murder Hole, Ke=Key, Tz=Treasure, No=None, Fo=Food, Al=Ale, Pz=Poison, Wa=Ward, Tr=Trap, R3=Roll 3, GM=GM’s choice

SPECIAL LEVELS – some dungeon levels are not the normal type of madness; they are a different type of madness, as follows.

Treasure levels: these levels appear in one of two situations: either immediately after a mini-boss level, or immediately after a level on which no PC picked up a treasure. On a treasure level, characters have 10 actions to collect as many treasures as they can. On each action, a character rolls a Speed contest, and collects a treasure for each point of his contest over 10. If two or more characters are competing, the competing characters roll their contests against each other; the character with the highest result collects a number of treasures equal to his contest less the next highest contest or 10, whichever is greater. No other competing characters collect treasure during that action. After the 10th round, the level dissolves into oblivion, and characters find themselves in a new, normal level.

Mini-boss levels: these levels appear every 10 levels, for groups using the Scaling rules. This level has two rooms. The first room, where the characters begin, is a randomly rolled room with a minimum size of 2, which has no contents and only one encounter: a mini-boss (see Scaling). Behind the mini-boss is a Door, leading to a room with Stairs, which lead to a treasure level. When the mini-boss is defeated, it drops a magic key. The characters can use normal swarm rules to attempt to circumvent the mini-boss and open the door. However, if the characters do not kill the mini-boss, the Stairs will lead to a normal dungeon level instead of a treasure level.

Dungeon Generation Tables:



Size
Shape
Exit-Loc
Exit-Typ
Exit-Num
Contents
SwSize (health)
Enc
Monstr


2
1
Square
North
Stair
1
Password
1
Wraith
Wizard


3
2
Rectangle
South
Stair
2
Roll 2
25%
Wraith
Wizard


4
3
Hallway
East
Crumble
3
Special
50%
None
Demon


5
4
Triangle
West
Crumble
4
Potion
75%
None
Demon


6
5
Circle
North
Secret
1
MurdHol
100%
Roll 2
Barb


7
1
Square
South
Walldoor
2
Key
1
Roll 2
Barb


8
2
Rectangle
East
Walldoor
3
Treasure
25%
Gen
Barb


9
3
Hallway
West
Door
4
None
50%
Gen
Ghost


10
4
Triangle
North
Open
2
Food
75%
Gen
Ghost


11
5
Circle
South
Food
3
Ale
100%
Swarm
Hobbit


12
1
Square
East
Food
4
Poison
1
Swarm
Hobbit


13
2
Rectangle
West
Treasure
1
Ward
25%
Mimic
Slime


14
3
Hallway
North
Treasure
2
Trap
50%
Mimic
Slime


15
4
Triangle
South
Teleport
3
Roll 3
75%
GM
GM


16
GM
GM
GM
GM
GM
GM
GM
GM
GM

DMMike
09-21-2014, 05:50 PM
Encounters

Each randomly-generated dungeon room requires at least one roll on the encounter table. An Amulet encounter is a meeting that means danger for the PCs: either monsters, generators, traps, or puzzles.

Monsters

There are five basic types of monsters which can form swarms (discussed later). Like the PCs, each monster has a melee, shot, and speed score. Monster health scores do not diminish over time, just by PC attacks. Each monster also has “tactics,” or a behavior that it always uses. These entries apply to non-swarms, which is when there are 1-3 of that monster type in the room. If an Amulet monster needs to use a skill besides attacking or maneuver (speed), its speed score can substitute for the skill needed.

- GHOSTS. These evil spirits exist only to possess the PCs and diminish their life force.
Health – 5
Melee – d8*
Shot – 0
Speed – 4
Tactics – Ghosts move directly toward the closest PC, even if that PC is behind a wall. If two or more PCs are equally close to ghosts, they spread their attacks evenly. *When a ghost strikes a PC, it ceases to exist. Ghosts cannot move through walls, so they often get stuck on their paths to the nearest PC.

- BARBARIANS. These brutes smash with their clubs, and ask questions later. They wear fur armor to display their combat prowess.
Health – 7
Melee – d8
Shot – 0
Speed – 2
Tactics – They use simple tactics: run and smash. Barbarians can’t detect enemies behind walls, but they’ll quickly counterattack when PCs hit them from murder holes. Barbarians aren’t bright enough to try to find alternate routes to PCs, but if a PC shows up in a doorway or opening, they’ll forget about murder holes.

- HOBBITS. Normally peace-loving gardeners, these short people have bad attitudes and slings.
Health – 5
Melee – d6
Shot – d6
Speed – 3
Tactics – Hobbits go where they must to get a shot, which is anywhere in the same room as PCs. Hobbit shots are weak, but because of their bullet trajectories, they can attack from above, even when there are comrades between them and the PCs.

- SLIMES. These friendly little things look like delicious gumdrops, but they burn like fire.
Health – 5*
Melee – d10*
Shot – 0
Speed – 2
Tactics – The “eyes” on these slimeballs are more like lymph nodes – slimes can’t see. They wait in place until they feel the tremors of a PC in the same room. Then they slowly scoot over, trying to get underfoot. *A slime that strikes a PC ceases to exist. Weapons deal no damage to slimes; only potions deal damage to them.

- DEMONS. Nasty creatures from a nastier place. If a demon only spits poison at you, consider yourself lucky. Cunning and wicked, demons are dangerous foes.
Health – 10
Melee – d8
Shot – d8
Speed – 4
Tactics – Demons charge toward PCs that they can see. They will not, however, wait behind each other for a chance to get a shot. So demons move to get open shots on PCs. They’ll shoot and move until they’re close enough to bite.

- WIZARDS. These geniuses were somehow brainwashed into working for the power of the Amulet. And each knows the same two spells: fireball and blink.
Health – 5*
Melee – d6
Shot – d10
Speed – 3
Tactics – *They use a blink spell continuously, which prevents any odd-numbered damage result from causing damage. Wizards are weak in close-combat and avoid it, so their speed scores (see Combat) work opposite normal: succeed on a speed contest to engage a wizard, not avoid it.

- OTHER MONSTERS. Other Modos RPG monsters can be used in Amulet. To drop them into the dungeon, give them health equal to half their protection die, plus 1/3 of their max physical damage. Substitute melee or unarmed damage for the melee score, whichever is higher, and ranged or spell damage (die) for the shot score. The speed score is the monster’s movement skill points or physical bonus, whichever is higher. Be sure to compare your monster conversion to the above monsters – it should probably be a rare find if it’s tougher than the rest.

DMMike
09-26-2014, 12:55 PM
Note: I need descriptions for monster-swarm tactics...

SwarmsMore often than not, one monster will have several friends. A swarm is any group of monsters numbering four or more that generally move as a group. Except for health, their scores are the same as the individual monsters of that type.

HEALTH – Monsters in a swarm share the same pool of health. The GM should note how much health is equal to three times an individual’s health; when swarm health dips below this amount, the swarm is “scattered,” and ceases to be a swarm (see Scattered). When it is necessary to know how many of a particular creature make up a swarm, divide the swarm’s health by 5 or 10, whichever is closer to the individual creature’s health.

SIZE – Swarms are measured by how much of a room they fill. Room capacity is measured solely by the room’s size measured in units. Each unit of size supports 20 health of swarm. So a 1-unit room holds 20 health, and a 5-unit room holds 100 health. When rolling up a swarm, its size will be:
1 – means that one creature is present, not a swarm. Lone monsters cannot swarm PCs.
25% - divide the room’s capacity by four to determine swarm size. This is likely to scatter the swarm (see scattered). This swarm can swarm 1 PC.
50% - divide the room’s capacity by two to determine swarm size. Smaller rooms at 50% will likely have scattered swarms. This swarm can swarm 2 PCs.
75% - subtract ¼ of the room’s capacity from its max capacity to find swarm size. This swarm can swarm 3 PCs.
100% - this room is packed with monsters. This swarm can swarm all PCs.
Scattered – a scattered swarm has been damaged to or beyond (less than) the threshold of 3 times a single montser’s health. When this happens, the swarm’s abstract number becomes a concrete 3 monsters, and it ceases to be a swarm. Each creature should be run as a different monster, with full health.

SPEED – this is an all-important score for a swarm, because a swarm uses it for movement, attacking, evading, and most other things that a swarm can do. Swarm uses of speed are also covered in the Combat section, but that discussion is focused on the PC-side of combat.

Attacking – Swarms do not need to roll to attack; they deal melee damage, two times a single monster’s melee (i.e. roll twice), to each PC who doesn’t successfully maneuver (see Combat). When monsters swarm a lone PC, the swarm deals four times its melee damage. When monsters swarm a PC formation, the damage is two times melee. Swarms deal shot damage based on Room Size; the number of attacks made equal the room’s number of units.

Movement – Swarms have two primary maneuvers: swarming and pursuing. When PCs enter a room, monsters attempt to swarm, or surround, the PCs. The swarm uses its speed score as a bonus on this contest. However, the more time that PCs spend in the room is more time for the swarm to surround them. So, for each round spent in the room, the swarm gains +1 to its speed score. Scattering the swarm eliminates this bonus.
If PCs are not in the same room as the swarm, or they decide to flee from the swarm, some swarms will pursue, and the PCs must make speed contests against the swarm’s normal speed bonus. A failed contest indicates that the swarm has caught up with a PC, and it can then take its normal 2x attack damage. Swarm shots cannot damage fleeing PCs.

Evading – some swarms, like wizards, do not try to engage the PCs, because they are weak in close combat. PCs must win speed contests to engage these swarms in melee, and these swarms do not gain speed bonuses each round. Engaging an evading monster still subjects a PC to that monster’s melee damage.

Other uses – if a GM gets creative with his dungeon – adding stairs, tentacle-pits, or conveyor belts – monsters and swarms will need an ability to deal with such things. The speed score is a quick and easy bonus to grant to the monsters in their time, or contests, of need.

BEHAVIOR – each swarm has a different pack-mentality. This represents both the instincts of the individuals, and the consensus from group communication. When designing your own swarms, this is a great place to add personality to your creations.

DMMike
10-04-2014, 07:00 PM
Funny, I thought I had posted more. Anyway - the combat rules are still very ROUGH. Input is appreciated!

--------------------

Mimics

Not all treasure wards are actually treasure wards. Some, when a PC grabs one, are actually monsters that look like treasure. The wards around mimics block shots and monsters just like treasure wards. When a PC tries to grab one, it becomes an individual monster. A mimic has a 25% chance of actually being a treasure.
MIMICS – A chest overflowing with gold suddenly sprouts two arms with ugly claws, and a broad tail used for propulsion.
Health – 10
Melee – d8
Shot – 0
Speed – 2
Tactics – gains a +4 to its speed score on its first attack, for surprise. After that, a mimic uses its base speed score to attack either the PC who tried to collect it, or the next nearest PC. Mimics use tremors, from within the room, to detect PCs.
Generators

Some rooms contain a tall, grotesque shrine, seemingly made up of four doorways connected in a square. Inside this shrine is pure darkness, but looking into a generator, one sees a dim light, which shortly takes a creature’s shape, which then one realizes is actually a monster, moving through a doorway.
A generator has 20 health, and adds monsters to a swarm until that swarm’s size reaches 100%. Every 10 rounds, a generator dispenses another monster, and if this monster is part of a swarm, the swarm’s health increases by the full amount of that monster’s health. This rate can be increased for games using the Scaling option.
Wraiths

Sometimes characters will encounter a darkness in a room. In the corner of one’s eye, it looks almost like a cloaked farmer, reaping with a scythe. But looking directly at a wraith, one sees only wavering darkness, with a terrible, black core.

WRAITHS – a dark presence floats toward you, like death incarnate.
Health – 100*
Melee – d10
Shot – 0
Speed – 3
Tactics – attacks the nearest accessible PC. Like ghosts, wraiths are easy to fool and will turn to pursue threats that are behind murder holes. If wraiths have no targets in a room, they wander slowly until another PC becomes visible. *Magic potions will destroy a wraith if there is not another wraith closer to the potion used.
Locks

All doors and walldoors in a dungeon are locked. Locks typically have a magical nature to them, which seems reasonable once one notices that all keyholes are located directly in the middle of each door that they inhabit. Any lock can be defeated once by any magical key or magic ward, and once defeated, that door opens and ceases to exit.
Sometimes characters find themselves without enough keys to proceed further into the dungeon, or unwilling to use a key. Sometimes, this can be a clue to the party that they’re about to die, and had better collect any remaining treasure wards while they still can.
If the GM is using the full Modos RPG rules, then characters with lockpicks can open locks without using magical keys. Give the lock an amount of health equal to 2 times the dungeon level. One character may spend an action attempting to open the lock, and roll 1d4 to determine the progress, or damage, made toward opening the lock. Once the lock’s damage equals its health, the lock is defeated. Increase the damage die of the lockpicks for each skill point that the lockpicker has in Larceny.
Bosses

Monsters whisper amongst themselves, “do not wander onto this level. There’s a big one there!” While mini-bosses, challenging monsters that tend to be landmarks in a dungeon, are not included on the Encounter table, they can be introduced on special dungeon levels and under certain circumstances.
The easiest way to decide that a mini-boss is present is to drop one into your room when the room has only one other exit, which is a Stair, and the room is large enough for a mini-boss. Or Exits=2, Exit-Type=Stair, and Room Size=5.
The features of a mini-boss are described in Meta-Dungeon, Scaling.
Puzzles

In order to make encounters and dungeons more interesting, sometimes it’s necessary to include a puzzle in an encounter. Puzzles are situations that occur either through the random generation of the dungeon or at the GM’s discretion.

BANE OR BOON – Ale, poison, wards, traps, and mimics have a chance of being something else. A GM can simply describe poison as being “ale,” or traps as being “wards,” but when there is no GM, a PC will know that it’s actually poison or a trap, because that’s what he rolled on the dungeon generation table. To give PCs an incentive to investigate these things anyway, they have a 25% chance of being a boon instead of a bane. To discover this chance, the PC collecting the item rolls 1d4. On a result of 1, the content turns out to be its counterpart.
For example, Questnir is the mapper. He rolls 2d8 on Room Contents and gets 12; there’s a jug of Poison in the room. He’s feeling brave, while his fellow PCs are not. He picks up the jug (touches the ward), and rolls 1d4. If he rolls 1, he gains 5 health instead of losing 5 health, because the Poison is actually an Ale.

CASTLE GENERATORS – when characters peep through a murder hole, they might see a generator. Sometimes this generator has been placed directly against the murder hole, enabling it to generate a swarm both in the room in which it sits and in the room adjacent to the murder hole. More rarely, a generator sits entirely in one room, but sturdy walls stand around it, enabling monsters to leave the generator while providing protection to it.
To simulate the difficulty in damaging such a generator, these generators can only be hit with Shot attacks. Generators located somewhere in the adjacent room are 50% likely to be within range of Shot attacks. Generators placed adjacent to a murder hole are 100% likely to be in range, and act as the generator rolled for both rooms if each room gets a “generator” result during room generation. When the generator spawns a monster, that monster contributes to the swarm in the room occupied by PCs. A PC can stand in front of the murder hole, preventing monsters from spawning in his room, but he cannot use any bonuses on Speed contests while doing so.

EXIT NOW OR LATER – it is possible to roll more than one Stair on a dungeon level. This introduces the question: which Stair should PCs use? The simple answer, especially if using Scaling, is that PCs should continue to explore the current dungeon level if they want to find more treasure before things get more difficult. This choice postpones their 10 health bonus for reaching “fresh” air.
To spice things up, the GM can decide that when there are more than one Stair, one of them leads to a treasure level (see Dungeons – Creation – Special Levels). To determine if the PCs have chosen the lucky Stair, take the total number of Stairs found, add one if it’s an odd number, and then roll a die with that number of sides. On a result of 1, the characters chose the treasure level.

SAVE OR SHARE – characters can find several different resources in the dungeon, some of which are potions, food, and keys. These resources cannot be shared once they have been collected (the amulets store there in a magical space for characters). So the conundrum for characters is oftentimes: should I collect this item, or allow another character to do so? When a character’s inventory is full (i.e. he has 12 potions/keys), he cannot collect any more potions or keys without using some first, so it’s much easier to share. Sometimes a useful item, like a potion, stands amidst a swarm of monsters. Can a Wizard, who makes better use of a potion, reach it safely? Or is the more maneuverable Elf more likely to reach the potion safely?
The GM, or puppet master, has some control over these outcomes by choosing who gets attacked by the monsters or swarm. Make choices that represent the monsters, but also make things interesting for the PCs.

SHOOTING GALLERY – murder holes can frequently give PCs a chance to destroy swarms without the risk of being swarmed by them. A murder hole can be used in this way by one PC, and permits only Shot attacks. This is an either-or decision by the PC: standing at the murder hole allows him to safely attack a swarm, but it prevents him from finding Stairs and Food while he’s doing so.

TAKE ONE FOR THE TEAM – some swarms focus their attacks on only one PC, and other swarms have no choice, when a PC stands in a choke point (see Combat – Maneuver). When this happens, the lone PC is likely to take a lot of damage, but it frees the other PCs to explore without the danger of being attacked by the swarm attacking their comrade. Until, of course, the PCs find another swarm.

TELEPORT OR DIE – teleporters allow PCs to quickly enter or leave certain rooms. Since teleporters are usually found somewhere in the middle of a room, a PC can use it to draw a swarm away from an entrance. When a PC teleports amongst a swarm, the swarm ceases to increase its Speed bonus gained against other PCs while it adjusts to the new threat, for a number of actions equal to its current bonus.
For example, a party of PCs enters a room chock-full of barbarians. The barbarians turn their ugly heads and swarm toward the PCs. The PCs stand and fight for three actions. The barbarians have gained +3 to their Speed scores for the three actions spent swarming. However, a teleporter stands amidst the barbarians. A sly PC has gone back to a previous teleporter, and teleports into the room during the fourth round. The barbarians attack the PC group this action, but another PC teleports amongst them, sewing confusion. On the next action, the barbarians do not gain a bonus against the PCs at an entrance, remaining at +3, but they gain +1 against the teleporting PC. The swarm gains +1 Speed against the teleporting PC for two more rounds (unless he teleports away), and on the next round, its bonus against any and all PCs increases to +4.

Combat

The focus of a game of Amulet is frantic racing through a dungeon, destroying lots of monsters as characters go. This section discusses the fundamental combat rules you’ll need to get through the dungeon. Many of these rules represent slight variations of Modos RPG rules, while some are unique to Amulet. This section starts with the fundamental rules you’ll need to get fights going, then discusses the general shape of combat rounds. This is followed by a section on tactics – ways to make combat more interesting. Next are some ideas for running the game outside of combat, and the last section contains guidance for the GM and players taking GM roles.
Fundamentals

These are the actual game mechanics required to run combat in Amulet, used to form the larger concepts of combat rounds and tactics.
SCORES – Each character, including monsters and swarms, has some scores that represent or influence what he can do in the game.
Health – this is a measurement of a character’s distance from death. Swarms that lose health slowly see their constituent monsters drop. Monsters that run out of health disappear shortly after dying. Fallen heroes, however, can soon stand up, shake off their wounds, and keep fighting – if they have a guardian angel (extra token). Health is equivalent to Max Damage minus Physical Damage, from the core rules.
Armor – this is always stated as a take-half result of one’s armor protection. When a PC takes damage, he subtracts this amount from each die of damage, or multiplies armor by the number of attacks he takes, and subtracts the result from total damage. Monsters do not have armor because their toughness is represented by Health alone.
Magic – a composite score representing magic skill, metaphysical ability, and magic-related perks. Characters use the Magic score to create magical bursts of power upon quaffing a magic potion. When they do so, they roll the Magic die six times to find the total damage inflicted on monsters and swarms.
Melee – characters use this score when in direct contact with enemies. It represents the fight (melee) skill and the weapon’s damage die.
Shot – this is the damage done by the character’s weapon when he flings it from his hand. As soon as one shot lands, the character’s weapon is ready to be flung again. It represents the fight (missile) skill and the weapon’s damage die.
Speed – this score primarily represents a character’s ability to move effectively through a melee. In core rules terms, speed includes a character’s physical bonus, movement skill, and movement-related perks. The number given is the bonus that a character uses on movement contests.
CONTESTS – characters roll a contest whenever the outcome of an event is in doubt. Each side (the GM rolls for all non-players, even if a monster isn’t opposing the PC) rolls 1d20, adds its bonus, and the higher result finds more success. Amulet uses contests to determine when PCs come into contact with monsters (or get swarmed), to determine which PCs find secret doors, for escaping traps, and to see if PCs can outrun monsters, but many more uses are possible. Remember that a contest isn’t necessary if an action would be easy for a PC.
TAKE HALF – to save time, the GM should skip rolling a die and just use half of the highest result on the die whenever it makes sense. This goes for contests, damage, and any non-dungeon-generation rolls. Players are welcome to take half as well, but if the GM’s contest bonus is close (within one or two points) to a PC’s contest bonus, the GM should roll when a player takes half.
DAMAGE – this is an abstract concept, because it doesn’t directly measure the marks made on a surface; it serves mostly to reduce health. Damage is caused by melee attacks, shots, potions, the countdown, and other physical sources of damage included by the GM.
MOVEMENT – also called maneuver, this is not measured in feet or relative position. Movement is measured in units – the same way that room size is measured. Each successful movement action taken by a character moves him one unit, represented by the sides of grid boxes or their diagonals from corner to corner.
SWARMED – few fates in Amulet are worse than getting swarmed (surrounded). Most monster swarms move ceaselessly to surround the PCs. When a character is swarmed, he cannot maneuver – he must reduce the swarm’s health until it can no longer swarm him, or hope that his friends can do so. Swarmed characters cannot use Shot attacks; they must use melee only.
Combat Rounds

A round in Amulet gives each character a chance to act. The following are the features of combat rounds, and their variations from the core rules.
ACTIONS – a combat round includes one to three actions per character. If several different types of actions are taking place, one action per round allows the GM to carefully adjudicate all outcomes. But sometimes characters are just trying to damage a swarm, and the swarm is attacking back. For these types of rounds, the GM can combine three actions by each character, and allow three actions – three shots or melee attacks – at a time. PCs can roll all their dice at the same time, and the GM simply goes around the table, collecting everyone’s results.
INITIATIVE – Amulet allows all characters to act at the same time, and focuses attention on the actions of the heroes, so rolling initiative is not necessary. PCs determine the success of monster efforts by making movement contests against them. Think of monster presence in a room as a static feature, and the actions of the PCs determine their success.
ATTACKING – If aggressive monsters are in a room, a PC can attack them simply by rolling his melee die. This costs one action, and the die roll determines the damage that the monster takes. If he wants to use shots, he’ll need to succeed on a movement contest (adding his Speed bonus, but not requiring an action) against the monster’s movement contest for each round spent shooting. Defensive monsters, however, try to avoid melee. Shot attacks on them require only a Shot die roll to determine damage. To use Melee, a movement contest is required once per round. Using a potion takes one action, and does not require a contest.
DEFENDING – As in core rules, armor protection automatically applies against damage (see Armor). Sometimes characters want to avoid specific monsters, like Wraiths or Mini-Bosses, so a movement contest is required each round to stay out of that creature’s reach, if it chooses to attack a particular PC. A movement contest is also required to avoid monster shots. Success indicates that all shots were avoided, and failure indicates that all shot attacks targeting a particular PC succeeded.
MANEUVER – crossing rooms generally takes one action per unit crossed. If that room has monsters or a swarm in it, a character must make contests to determine whether each movement action succeeds. A successful character can choose to shoot (Shot) or attack (Melee) as he goes, but a character failing his movement contest faces certain consequences. If the opposing contest succeeds by 4 or more, the character has run directly into a monster or swarm, and must take one melee attack from a monster, or two melee attacks from a swarm. If the opposing contest succeeds by 8 or more, the PC has been swarmed, and must use his melee score or potions to fight his way out.

DMMike
10-09-2014, 07:08 PM
The combat effect I'm going for here is like this:



GM or Mapper rolls up the room and its contents.
All PCs announce their intent, and everyone rolls for one round.
Damage gets dealt, and non-attack actions get resolved.
All characters suffer Countdown damage every 10 actions.
Next round begins.



To speed up combat, I want PCs to be able to make several attacks at one time, which means taking several actions at one time (and several rolls). But some actions need to be resolved with contests (d20 vs. d20 or a static score) - like PCs maneuvering through a swarm without getting swarmed (surrounded), or enemy wizards trying to avoid combat. If these sorts of things happen in the middle of a clump of actions, they can affect the outcomes of the remaining actions.

For example, a PC wants to race across a room to get to a teleporter. Depending on the size of the room, he'll need to make some maneuver contests against a swarm of ghosts to do it. If he fails his second maneuver contest miserably, he'll be swarmed, and unable to spend his third action maneuvering. If another PC rolled three attack dice, intending just to shoot for the round, then when his comrade gets stuck on action 2, he might wish that his third action (which he's already rolled) had been to use a potion instead.

How do I include the thrill (?) of a dice pool (multi-action) damage throw with an action-by-action resolution needed for maneuvering and/or tactical positioning?

TMI: Swarms of monsters are also currently slated to get a cumulative maneuver bonus on each action to simulate the condensation of the swarm.