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View Full Version : Cthulhutech: I rarely buy books based on the cover, but. . .



PhishStyx
05-04-2007, 10:40 PM
OMG, I think I'm now in love.

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/144/382508400_81824df59e_o.jpg

Deathworm22
05-04-2007, 10:55 PM
Where can i buy this book? Are the pictures all as good as this?

PhishStyx
05-04-2007, 11:01 PM
See the Upcoming Product Releases at the top of the forum, brudda.

Deathworm22
05-04-2007, 11:07 PM
Hey do you think Barnes and Nobles has Drows of the Underdark yet.

PhishStyx
05-04-2007, 11:10 PM
Hey do you think Barnes and Nobles has Drows of the Underdark yet.


Sorry, haven't got a clue there. I don't buy D&D, so I very rarely keep track. However, if you can order it from the site and availability is 24 hours, then I think, yes, most likely.

(No, really, I don't. Not ever.)

Farcaster
05-07-2007, 11:49 AM
That is incredibly nice artwork. I'm not much of a Cthulu fan, but the artwork alone is enough to consider picking up a copy.

Rain_Spider_08
07-24-2007, 10:32 PM
I've always been kinda interested in Cthulu but sadly the books are hard to come by here :( so I haven't had much of a chance to learn more about it... that picture is VERY nice though

PhishStyx
08-02-2007, 03:40 PM
Say, did anyone ever pick this up? I've been meaning to, but haven't had an opportunity, yet.

Moritz
08-02-2007, 04:54 PM
Yep, that totally looks sweet. I'd probably buy it. And then I'd kill everyone in the party with it.

fmitchell
08-06-2007, 02:48 AM
I've always been kinda interested in Cthulu but sadly the books are hard to come by here :( so I haven't had much of a chance to learn more about it... that picture is VERY nice though

Well, Cthulhutech looks like it has about as much to do with Lovecraft as Warhammer has to do with Tolkien.

If you can't find Chaosium's books where you live, you could read a couple of Lovecraft's stories. They should be at a nearby bookstore or library. Warning: if you don't like archaic language, you won't like Lovecraft. (Try Thomas Ligotti if you can find him; a similar feel, but more modern language and fewer nameless tentacled things.)

Moritz
08-06-2007, 10:25 AM
Reading anything Lovecraft is a must for everyone who is interested in horror or general darkness. The language is amazing and it's too bad that our society no longer uses such words to convey thoughts or ideas to one another. We're currently devolving our grammar to things like WTF, OMG, LOL, and so on. I dread the future when people rarely use full words, when they just talk to one another in mnemonics or acronyms.

Farcaster
08-06-2007, 05:21 PM
Oh, I don't know, Mortiz. There are still plenty of very articulate authors out in the world.

Moritz
08-10-2007, 04:31 PM
With the advent of the word processor, writing has turned into a smattering of useless and redundant words that appear as if a thesaurus vomited upon the page. In contrast, Lovecraft chose unique words which when linked together in his archaic style, were like a flowing and intense music to the reader.

And yeah, I really hammed it up.

I'm sure there's good work out there now, I even read pretty frequently. But nothing that I have come across has had the level and clarity of shadow and detail all at once that Lovecraft presented.

PhishStyx
08-28-2007, 07:09 PM
The game's website:
http://www.cthulhutech.com/index.html

According the forum, it's being released for sale on Monday, Sept. 3rd.

I'm not sure I'm going to get to buy it in the next month, but I'm looking forward to the first reviews at the very least.

PhishStyx
08-28-2007, 07:47 PM
Well, Cthulhutech looks like it has about as much to do with Lovecraft as Warhammer has to do with Tolkien.


The truth of roleplaying is that it's extremely difficult to run a game that emulates Lovecraft's writing style. I'm not even sure I'd want to run a game that attempts to ape early 20th Century short horror fiction.

Moritz is right about Lovecraft's descriptive style and in that all too much of what gets published now is derivative drivelly garbage. However, that garbage is published because it sells. I seldom look at the "horror" section in the bookstore because I know beforehand that I'll be looking at a billion boring awful Steven King novels, and for the same reason, I rarely pick up a fantasy book either.

Currently, if asked I tend to recommend Walter Jon Williams, Neal Stephenson, and Roger Zelazny (I know he died 12 years ago, but I don't know anyone who's read more of his work than me even on the Amber listservs, so I still recommend him). And yes, I know none of them are horror writers, but I so rarely read horror that I'm not sure who I would recommend beyond the true genre classic writers, Poe, Lovecraft, Shelley, and Stoker. Perhaps Alex Garland (writer of the zombie movie 28 Days Later and the Halo movie), I just finished a psychological horror book by him called The Coma.

Moritz
08-29-2007, 09:15 AM
Back in the early 90's I discovered Dean Koontz. I probably read 10 or 15 of his early work. Really enjoyed it. But like any writer, it tends to become predictable. Still, it was good stuff to read. The book "Midnight" featured a small coastal town called Moonlight Cove. It offered a lot of sci-fi stimulation and gave me several plot ideas for my modern games.

PhishStyx
08-29-2007, 05:27 PM
Well, any writer who you read 15 novels by is going to become easy to anticipate in word choice, in some plot directions, even in some story goals. That's not what I call predictable; it's familiarity, and it's a good sign that you enjoy reading that writer's work.

There's nothing at all wrong with that. I'm talking about a writer who's work makes you yawn halfway through the first couple chapters because you've seen his plot rehashed a half dozen times in the same tired way, and it got old a long time ago. The "Tolkein-clone" problem is a major example of this kind of poor writing.

Severan
02-20-2008, 09:25 PM
The truth of roleplaying is that it's extremely difficult to run a game that emulates Lovecraft's writing style. I'm not even sure I'd want to run a game that attempts to ape early 20th Century short horror fiction.
.

Hmm... I agree that it is difficult. However it can be done. I have had a few GMs run Chaosium's Call of Cthulhu and pull off a decent job of it.

rabkala
02-24-2008, 08:24 PM
Most of the games of CoC I played, involved dying within about an hour of starting. The GM treated the genre and game like just another teenage slasher flick in a slightly unusual setting.

Drohem
02-25-2008, 11:18 AM
Most of the games of CoC I played, involved dying within about an hour of starting. The GM treated the genre and game like just another teenage slasher flick in a slightly unusual setting.

That's too bad. CoC is definitely deadly and if you just throw opponents after opponents at the PCs, then they are going to die.

boulet
02-25-2008, 11:51 AM
That's too bad. CoC is definitely deadly and if you just throw opponents after opponents at the PCs, then they are going to die.And they're going to ask to switch back to D&D after two sessions like that :)

rabkala
02-25-2008, 10:34 PM
And they're going to ask to switch back to D&D after two sessions like that :)
I think we held out for 4 sessions before demanding a switch....

Jonathan Kwiat
03-02-2008, 01:18 PM
Yeah, I am love to looking at that picture. Unfortunately when I meet somebody like that it does not last. :) Thankfully it does not last.

Anyway can't we paste the Graphics Artists name over that material? I ain't some intellectual property fanatic but if this post lasts on the board can't the poor people who signed their work away to a corporation get some credit?

-Be Well, Jonathan