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Kaison02
03-29-2011, 05:00 PM
I have DMed D&D for years. I love Character development over everything else. Then I was introduced to The storyteller system, my first full game was played With Vampire the darkages. I wrote a story of my own. Or should I say i have a random assortment of information. I know what the story is and the true story. This is set in normal Wod

these are the questions for help.

What should a story look like prior to starting the first game?

My worse flaw is being subtle. There is the storyline of what the players see and then the actual storyline of whats going on for real.

Can I have some tips on how to put hints in general to allow players to figure out what is really going on?

TAROT
03-30-2011, 12:21 PM
What should a story look like prior to starting the first game?

I think that every GM has to find their own rhythm and work to their strengths. About the only thing that is considered to be in poor form is to have already decided on an ending.

At a bare minimum, you need a villain, a goal and a why. (And two immediately subsequent whys are even better.) Generally useful are a few interesting locations and people. Other tools that can be used include: maps, timelines, flowcharts, visual aids/props/handouts. Really, no different from D&D. I think it's more a matter of how you feel comfortable accessing the information (and that whole right- and left-brain thing).


My worse flaw is being subtle. There is the storyline of what the players see and then the actual storyline of whats going on for real.
Can I have some tips on how to put hints in general to allow players to figure out what is really going on?

I've found that you don't need to drop any red herrings, because players are perfectly capable of inventing their own. Even if you put a Post-it saying, "This is a clue!" on an object, players are more than capable of ignoring it. And then there are other players, who have solved the entire mystery halfway through your opening scene.

As to whether the players figure out the real story. If they do, huzzah. If they don't, let them catch a patsy, and you get to keep your villain for a later time.

Blond Gamer Girl
03-30-2011, 03:49 PM
I ran one for years. I too am a fan of subtle. Use description to help in clue finding. My thing is players should NOT be spoon fed. Right of the bat I say "think or sink." I took subtle to mean that. Agreed with above. As to little adventures, don't forget travel is long and dangerous esp in WoD. Check out my blog for other stuff. Cards of Doom were invented for my dark ages game.

Pephredo
04-23-2011, 05:24 PM
I think in terms of being subtle, the key is to trust your players. Trust that they're smart people and can figure out the clues. But, make them work for it. It's all the more satisfying if they come to the conclusions all on their own without beating them over the head with the clues and information.

In writing, there's the old Anton Chekov quote that if you put a gun on the mantle in the first scene, it better go off by the end of the story. That, to me, implies two things: first, set up your events by putting the clues there and fulfill the promise they give the reader; and second, you don't have to tell the audience that there's a gun on the mantle. It's there. They can see it. Let them infer that it might go off, then satisfy them when it does.

For gaming, make your details count, let everything you describe seem inevitable in the story, and see to it that it makes sense in the overall context. They'll accept that what's there is there. Then when that seemingly hidden detail inextricably woven into the background fabric of your story turns out to be key in the plot, or they remember it and go back to it, they'll realize they had the answers all along. They'll have done the work on their own, and the payoff will be all the more satisfying.

MortonStromgal
06-02-2011, 02:24 PM
What should a story look like prior to starting the first game?

My worse flaw is being subtle. There is the storyline of what the players see and then the actual storyline of whats going on for real.

Can I have some tips on how to put hints in general to allow players to figure out what is really going on?

I like to write down a bit about the city,

Seattle - Rain, Grey, the poor working class vs the rich elite, green forests

then move on to some important places - UW, Chase (WAMU) Tower, Microsoft, Troll under the bridge, Seattle Underground, International District, Quest Field, Warehouse district.

Now build some NPCs and relation ship maps

Le Croix - Elite Banker (Vampire) has his sites on being prince, allies Tom (the gambler, Werewolf), Debora (Software Developer - Microsoft, Mage), Sid (local rock sensation, Vampire); enemies Prince Rudolf, Victoria
Prince Rudolf - Maintains order in the city, allies Mansfield (Sheriff), The Librarians (Mage Cabal on UW campus), Loggers Union (Werewolf controlled), Nox (Vampire computer Hacker), Silas (Vampire club owner); enemies Le Croix, Victoria
Victoria - Ancient Mage who wants to bring about the return of a powerful spirit destroying Seattle in the process.

Then write down 3 things that will happen in todays game
Victoria acquires the living oak focus, one of 7 components needed for her spell, killing the taslmonger and destroying his shop in the warehouse district in the proccess
One of Sids groupies ends up being a vampire hunter and tries to kill him in front of the PCs
The Loggers Union is having problems with spirits in the forest.