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View Full Version : Is true for an average American?



Barry
02-02-2011, 05:34 PM
Check the vid

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nu4YG5PifCA

Do you guys believe these numbers to be true?

fmitchell
02-02-2011, 08:42 PM
Do you guys believe these numbers to be true?

No reason not to. The original data is at this site (http://www.bls.gov/cex/), so if you want to trawl through it and find discrepancies, go for it.

What in particular do you find incredible?

Malruhn
02-03-2011, 07:05 PM
They do mix things up a bit - like saying how much is spent on rent -then saying how much is spent on mortgages... as if the numbers are interrelated when they aren't. They then give the average/total for housing as if it's a completely separate number. That's three numbers for one cost of living expense.

The numbers are accurate - but slightly misrepresented.

Other than that - it seems on the up and up. What's the confusion?

tesral
02-09-2011, 04:05 PM
Taxes most of it.

bethany25
04-11-2011, 08:19 AM
Averages are just that - averages...everyone's spending habits vary slightly depending on their lifestyle...I spend loads on online games (http://browsergamez.com/), less on food and more on fitness, whereas my brother spends less on playing games online (http://browsergamez.com/), more on food, and less on fitness...we are all unique examples :)

templeorder
04-11-2011, 12:20 PM
Its an average and may not apply to you. Sadly i pay way more in mortgage than average and the numbers do not match for me.

tesral
04-11-2011, 03:39 PM
Normal is a setting on the washing machine. The Average American, or any other 'can does not exist. They are a statistical construct.

There are three kinds of lies. Lies, damn lies and statistics. Example, that oft quoted saw that medieval people on average died by the age of 35. However if you account for the high infant mortality rates, and eliminate deaths of those under 5 years of age that figure climbs to around 60 or so. Stastitics say 35, but the reality was if you could get out of young childhood alive you had a good run at old age.

Never trust average. There are too many ways to skew the results. (http://www.xkcd.com/882/)

mrken
04-11-2011, 08:23 PM
A few months back I read that someone earning $16,000 has as much disposable income as someone earning $66,000. In other words, If you work a part time job, was on food stamps, public housing, Medicaid, and on an on. You would have as much money as someone who worked their ass off and gave most of it to the governments to pay those who took it easy.

tesral
04-11-2011, 10:26 PM
As someone that use to make $16.000 a year I can tell you that is a crock of bull.

Sascha
04-11-2011, 11:23 PM
A few months back I read that someone earning $16,000 has as much disposable income as someone earning $66,000. In other words, If you work a part time job, was on food stamps, public housing, Medicaid, and on an on. You would have as much money as someone who worked their ass off and gave most of it to the governments to pay those who took it easy.
(Original article here (http://www.northsidesun.com/view/full_story/9915498/article-With-welfare-it-makes-sense-to-work-less?); critiques here (http://www.northsidesun.com/view/full_story/11003667/article-Welfare-benefits-not-as-generous-as-it-may-seem?), here (http://junkcharts.typepad.com/numbersruleyourworld/2010/12/checking-the-numbers-means-more-than-checking-just-the-numbers.html) and here (http://www.stat.columbia.edu/%7Ecook/movabletype/archives/2010/12/why_work.html).)

Assuming a very loose, and technically incorrect, definition of "disposable income", someone might be able to do that. But 'might be able to' and 'actually does' are pretty different in practice.