PDA

View Full Version : stepson wants to play which virsion should i start him on



choptop
10-28-2010, 02:29 AM
which virsion should i start him at i learnt and played alot on 3.5 but i was wondering if i should start him out on 4E

Calyx
10-28-2010, 08:27 AM
Definitely 3.5 In my opinion, as well as my friend's, it's a far better system than 4

Sascha
10-28-2010, 10:36 AM
Whichever system you feel more comfortable running, use that.

(That said, depending on age and interests, your stepson might be more responsive to one system over another. Also, would it be a one-on-one thing, or will there be other players involved?)

choptop
10-28-2010, 06:35 PM
to teach him basics one on one

Arch Lich Thoth-Amon
10-28-2010, 07:13 PM
Go with the one you know.

Dragon of Tyr
10-28-2010, 09:41 PM
I'm inclined to agree with Thoth-Amon here, with one caveat....you should go with what you know for the purposes of teaching the craft, and being able to answer his questions, but after the essentials are passed on, you should conclude with, "now that's (blah) edition, there's also this version," and try out which seems best to him. It wouldn't be fair to pass on bias to a future gamer, better system or not.

DMMike
10-31-2010, 09:23 PM
3.5. Tables are streamlined from 2Ed, and bonuses are always plus and penalties always minus.

Unlike 4Ed, your wizard can research spells, your cleric does most of the healing, and dragons don't shift where the halfling wants them to. Sooo...3Ed makes sense.

domjunky
11-01-2010, 05:15 AM
I'd have to agree with the folks saying to go with the one you know. With that said, if your step-son is young, 4e is a lot easier to grasp than 3.5. It's not as rule-heavy, and combat is very straightforward. Or you could just do a rules-light version of 3.5.

Stormbow
11-02-2010, 11:57 PM
which virsion should i start him at i learnt and played alot on 3.5 but i was wondering if i should start him out on 4E

There's really only one good answer for this, in my opinion.

3117

The D&D Red Box (of legend).

The original edition (that I learned the real rules of the game through) had a single player adventure that taught me the basics of the game before I ever even got into a serious group and played. I can only hope that the new red box (that's back) has that same solo adventure in it.

Best of luck!

domjunky
11-03-2010, 02:28 AM
touché


There's really only one good answer for this, in my opinion.

3117

The D&D Red Box (of legend).

The original edition (that I learned the real rules of the game through) had a single player adventure that taught me the basics of the game before I ever even got into a serious group and played. I can only hope that the new red box (that's back) has that same solo adventure in it.

Best of luck!

rabkala
11-04-2010, 11:27 PM
basic, expert ,advanced 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 3.5, then finally 4th. I guess I would go with what you know first, then a brief into to the final EDITION. We must all adapt and evolve or face extinction. You don't want to create a pathic hybrid who can do none of the above...

Otakar
11-05-2010, 01:10 PM
Hey, Choptop, I think it depends on how old he is. I recently played with a few younger newbies and they loved 4E. Get the basic set. If you get D&D 4E for Dummies book that has a nice little adventure in it. You can probably find it on Ebay, cheap. If you want me to loan you mine send me a PM and we'll work out the details. I don't want to sell it.

4E is heavy combat. There's no getting around it. It's like a miniatures game with some role play thrown it. Young people love it, though. I have had a great time with it as well.

If he's very story-oriented your 3.5 or Pathfinder may be better. My best friend swears by 3.5 and his group only uses miniatures for marching order. They visualize combat in their heads.

Let us know how it shakes out!

yukonhorror
11-05-2010, 02:04 PM
I have peaked at the essentials line, and it seems pretty great for players new to the concept of the game.

But, go with what you want to run as a DM. One exception, don't introduce the game at the level you know. both editions can be a bit overwhelming.

A bonus to doing 4e would be you'd both be going into it pretty fresh. It avoids the "you should have taken the Y feat along with the Z feat for the fighter so you get a +4 whenever you sunder a bad guys wooden shield" concept. There are enough similarities though that you can be ahead of the game enough to answer questions and run the game.

mrken
11-06-2010, 11:43 AM
Yeah, go easy on him. Easy rules, easy monsters, easy dice.

choptop
11-08-2010, 05:29 PM
well we both went and got 4e stuff it might be better for us both to start on a clean slate but come to find out his grandfather used to play a while back and we are going to see if he will come off of it when he gets back from Paris but i think also we might throw in the red box


and by the way he is nine and very smart for his age.


thanks all for the advice

Otakar
11-09-2010, 08:34 AM
Sounds like you've got a great family, Choptop! Have fun. I would be happy to read it if you blog it. Happy gaming!

choptop
11-09-2010, 04:22 PM
thanks all actually i was about to start a thread on his dragonborn paladin