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View Full Version : D&D Ask Wizards: 03/03/2007 -- Creating Magic Items for Profit



PnP News Bot
03-03-2007, 12:06 AM
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Check out this new article Wizards of the Coast posted recently:

Ask Wizards: 03/03/2007 (http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=dnd/ask/20070303a&dcmp=ILC-RSSDND)



Q: Why can't a wizard make money with item creation feats? And if he can't, then who is selling them at full price? If a wizard cannot make profit from item creation feats, then what use are those feats, other then making items for himself or the party?
--Jacob

ronpyatt
03-03-2007, 05:48 PM
That does bring up an interesting point. Are there merchant PC classes?

Farcaster
03-04-2007, 12:22 AM
The closest thing to that would be the Expert NPC class, probably. But, this snip from the answer to this question pretty well sums it up:


D&D isn't a game about running a business, it's a game about exploring dungeons, slaying dragons, and going home with piles of gold and shiny new magic items.

gdmcbride
03-04-2007, 01:58 AM
The closest thing to that would be the Expert NPC class, probably. But, this snip from the answer to this question pretty well sums it up:

I would be more persuaded by that argument if they hadn't actually put a system for running businesses in the DMG II.

Gary

Farcaster
03-04-2007, 03:17 AM
I've seen the idea tackled of having the PCs take up running a business in a game or even running a duchy or kingdom. These things can be fun if done in a very general way. However, the reality of all the minutia of managing a business or monarchy can quickly become quite dull, or at least, it does for me. The DMG II suggests some methods for spicing it up a bit, that is true, but personally, I would never want to play in a game where peddling wares and paying taxes took front seat to high adventure. If I want that, I can do that IRL. ;)

gdmcbride
03-04-2007, 09:17 AM
I've seen the idea tackled of having the PCs take up running a business in a game or even running a duchy or kingdom. These things can be fun if done in a very general way. However, the reality of all the minutia of managing a business or monarchy can quickly become quite dull, or at least, it does for me. The DMG II suggests some methods for spicing it up a bit, that is true, but personally, I would never want to play in a game where peddling wares and paying taxes took front seat to high adventure. If I want that, I can do that IRL. ;)

Actually, I've been in several games where a business or significant monetary component was an essential part of the story. They can be fun and providing interesting motivations. Of course, you don't want the actual minutae of running a biz to become a factor just as you don't want the actual minutae of running a person to enter game play. ("Describe to me your hygiene regime, Sir Abalor! Now save versus personal embarrassment as you run short of deodorant...")

And given the remarkable XP cost to build magic items in D&D, I have no trouble with a wizard who uses for example his membership in a mage's guild to sell magic items on commission in the magic shop (perhaps the seller takes 10% of 'blue book' cost). If you really want to trade XP for cash, wow, you go.

Gary

fmitchell
03-04-2007, 07:24 PM
D&D isn't a game about running a business, it's a game about exploring dungeons, slaying dragons, and going home with piles of gold and shiny new magic items.

Recently I read a review of John Wick's "Houses of the Blooded" (http://www.rpg.net/reviews/archive/12/12816.phtml) that attempts to turn that on its head. To quote the review, "everything that's not important in the hobby's juggernaut -- things like social interaction, clothes, and economy -- are the primary concerns".

We'll see whether it lives up to the review when it's finally released.

P.S. I forgot to mention HotB is FATE-based, not d20-based ... so maybe the above quote is actually true.

Farcaster
03-05-2007, 09:52 AM
And given the remarkable XP cost to build magic items in D&D, I have no trouble with a wizard who uses for example his membership in a mage's guild to sell magic items on commission in the magic shop (perhaps the seller takes 10% of 'blue book' cost). If you really want to trade XP for cash, wow, you go.

I generally allow my players to sell magic items pretty much instantaneously at the standard half value, but if they want to spend the time trying to peddle their goods on the market themselves, they can negotiate the price to around Market +/- 10% depending on their negotiating skills (diplomacy, appraise, bluff).

It does require a lot more time though to try to sell something that is the equivalent of a king's ransom, so they generally take the 50% and run.