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View Full Version : New to Shadowrun 4.0 w/questions.



Cirra
02-17-2010, 11:35 AM
I've never played an pen and paper RPG before. I have played many RPGs and MMORPGs. My husband had played Shadowrun with a group of his friends about 12 years ago, and hasn't played since. We were going to start a game by ourselves and get our kids involved when they're older.

I came here to ask if it's possible to play Shadowrun 4.0 with only two people? If so, how should it be handled? One of us being the GM and the other being a PC on a solo campaign? Or would the GM also have a PC?

Thanks for whatever help and advice you can give me.

Snuffy
02-17-2010, 02:55 PM
Any RPG is tough with only 2 people, but I think it will work for you guys until you are both comfortable with the rules. Then maybe add 1 or 2 players until your children are old enough.

I'm not familiar enough with Shadowrun to give any other pointers.

Have Fun!

Pk1305
02-17-2010, 08:44 PM
I would say that it is incredibly difficult to actually try and play a campaign with only two people. I think to really enjoy the game you need at least three people. Running a game is hard enough without needing to control 3/4s of the battle instead of just 1/2. I think you, as a new player, will enjoy the hobby a great deal more if you actually find another player to join you.

MortonStromgal
02-17-2010, 10:22 PM
You can certainly do it. Shadowrun wouldn't be my go to game in that situation but its perfectly doable. You'll need to write your adventures around the PC. I suggest making a paranormal investigator (mage) and playing a sorta dresden/x-files game with it to get your feat wet (3-5 games) then switch GM/PC rolls and have the other person make a decker and play a few games. They you can switch back and forth, when the kids get old enough you will have some established characters to teach the noobs.

BayGuardian
02-17-2010, 10:30 PM
Shadowrun is based around the 'covert team' approach. There needs to be a wide variety of skills available to accomplish the mission goals. That being said, it's certianly possible to run it with 1 GM/1 Player. The Harry Dresden model has been mentioned. Also, look at Max Headroom and Blade Runner, the latter being more solo oriented and the former working as a CP (Edison Carter) with NPC support staff.

One of the Shadowrun novels, 2XS, revolves around a solo PI, so it can give you a good feel of how to structure adventures.

Cirra
02-18-2010, 07:55 AM
Great, thanks for all the suggestions. I should have clarified that my husband and I were really just looking to get a solid grasp on the rules and game mechanics. Starting our own campaign together was to help us establish some characters, so that we can help our kids with their character creation, and run campaigns with them. Plus just trying to run through it on our own will show us how difficult it is with only two people. Plus it will make it that much more fun and rewarding when our games expands to 3-4 people.

I would like a solid clarification on whether the GM should/could be playing a PC simultaneously in one campaign. It looks like everyone was saying one GM, one PC per game and then switch rolls.

Thanks again for the help, I appreciate all the quick responses.

MortonStromgal
02-20-2010, 12:18 PM
Unless your running a pre-made adventure theres no reason you need a team. Therefore the one player and one GM is fine.

JediSoth
02-24-2010, 12:47 PM
I've found classless systems like Shadowrun to be far more conducive to running a 1-on-1 game than systems like D&D. I've dabbled a bit with the new version of Shadowrun and can think of dozens of ways a one-person team could work, especially if the character you make tends to be more a jack-of-all-trades rather than a specialist. If you go magic-light, you probably would be OK with a character that has some hacking and combat skills (along with RP-skills, of course).

A solo 'runner would draw a lot less attention than a team...probably cause less collateral damage, too.

ozedge
03-12-2010, 10:02 AM
Hey I love SR and i think 1 on 1 games can be pretty fun. Some of the above examples of play are good ones and i have played in a number of 1 on 1 games where the GM has taken up a character.

My personal opinion is both run characters as i think it will help you learn the rules.. then potentially drop the GM character when the kids come on board.

Maybe rotate your characters a bit so that you can learn how to run the different character types

entropy
04-06-2010, 04:16 PM
WOW. Shadowrun is about the most complex RPG I know of so that takes stones to start out with it! Make sure you like really complex rules and calculations. I've been playing it since it came out and many things (mostly hacking, combat, and magic) still get me confused, and require big time concentration and calculation. There are MUCH simpler systems out there if SR turns out to be too much complexity...

p.s. that said, I love SR, and currently play in a SR4 campaign! The world/lore and level of character customization is great.

Cirra
04-11-2010, 10:29 AM
Yes, my husband and I went through with the character creation process and realized that perhaps this is not the best game to introduce to our kids. The complexity may make it a boring drudge for them, and so we may choose to start with traditional D&D. We're considering other options for now, and will be tabling the SR until we have the free time to join a local group, or until our kids actually show interest in the game themselves.

cliff
04-12-2010, 01:25 PM
There are also games specifically designed for younger children that might make a good introduction to gaming for your kids.

I picked up a copy of "Those Meddling Kids," the subject matter of which is pretty obvious from the title. It is very suitable for younger children, although an existing appreciation for Scooby Doo would probably help them get into it easier.

I've also seen a few other children-oriented RPGs float through as PDFs on the RSS feed from DriveThruGames, but I don't remember the names off the top of my head.

If you're going to use D&D, I personally found 4th edition to be a bit much in terms of combat difficulty for my daughter... she was able to get into it, but she had too many options available for her. We have the added difficulty of not really having enough room to set up a good gaming table, and 4th edition isn't terribly easy to play without miniatures and a map.

At this point, I'm actually running GURPS for her, and not using the detailed combat rules but just the basic combat rules. The character creation is pretty complex, and I had to work very closely with her for that, but the actual play is pretty straight forward and she's having an easy time playing and getting into it.

For the curious, I'm running a Sliders game for her, where she's playing Karen Mallory, a female version of Quinn from an alternate reality... she's traveling with Professor Maxine Arturro, Remedy "Cry Baby" Brown and... well, Wade's a man's name, so the gender-swapped Wade is still named Wade. heh. I found it really helps to be able to show her episodes of the show so she sees what she's playing, but that her game is different enough that she's not going to run into the same things - but it does help her to make a connection.

MortonStromgal
04-12-2010, 10:55 PM
Yes, my husband and I went through with the character creation process and realized that perhaps this is not the best game to introduce to our kids. The complexity may make it a boring drudge for them, and so we may choose to start with traditional D&D. We're considering other options for now, and will be tabling the SR until we have the free time to join a local group, or until our kids actually show interest in the game themselves.

I hope you give SR a go again but personally I would start them on GURPS lite in their favorite setting. Go really lean on the rules, use ! skills (like GUNS!) and focus on story just use the rules as a guideline (ie you role 3d6 under your skill to succeed). If they show interest in a world that already has a game then by all means move to that. I plan to start my little one on Mouseguard for example.

cliff
04-13-2010, 02:20 PM
I can definitely see Mouseguard appealing to kids.