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shadowfalcon76
01-02-2010, 06:46 PM
As the title asks, I've been thinking of running a game based on Silent Hill (the series of video games by Konami), and was looking at a few systems to run it. I initially thought of Call of Cthulu, but have never seen the system or read any of the books, so I don't know if that'd be exactly what I want. A friend of mine lent me a copy of All Flesh Must Be Eaten when I told him about my idea, but that would work more for a Resident Evil type campaign, rather than Silent Hill. I don't see D&D (even Ravenloft) working well for this, either. Modern D20 might fare better, but I'm not sure about it (I've run MD20 before; not exactly what I was thinking about initially in looking for a system).

My other thoughts are either GURPS, or to check if World of Darkness has something that would fit the bill. Also, obviously, I'm asking you guys here to see if there's anything else out there that might work out.

For those of you who have not played a Silent Hill game, here is the Wiki entry on the series: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silent_Hill

Richard Littles
01-02-2010, 07:10 PM
I'd recommend the Hero System since it's generic and uses a toolkit approach.

Dark
01-03-2010, 08:54 AM
D20 Modern is very easy to use as is the Unisystem from AFMBE which you can adapt as well.

Otakar
01-03-2010, 10:04 AM
I'm a CoC fan. I mention in another post that when I've ran it none of the players had read much Lovecraft. They're interested, yes, but the Cthulu mythos didn't really make its "dread aberrant" inpact on them. I created a Halloween and Friday the 13th style adventure that they seemed to appreciate more than the mythos. To be honest, I still use the 1st Ed of CoC from the 80s. I really can't say what the latest Ed is like.

Bearfoot_Adam
01-03-2010, 11:47 AM
I think Unisystem would be great for a fast paced romp. Want even faster go cinematic unisystem. I would also look at New World of Darkness. I feel that the new system really allows for a good mortals game.

Webhead
01-03-2010, 12:11 PM
To be honest, I still use the 1st Ed of CoC from the 80s. I really can't say what the latest Ed is like.

Almost identical. CoC is famous for the fact that very little about the mechanics have changed in 28 years.

I would recommend Call of Cthulhu (any edition) or Unisystem. Both are very easy-to-use systems where characters can be made to feel very fragile both physically and mentally.

MortonStromgal
01-03-2010, 06:39 PM
Unknown Armies, granted only the first 1/3rd of the book will be useful as the rest is setting specific.

[edit] The New World of Darkness isn't a terrible idea either but UA offers several advantages by having really dangerous combat and the madness meters

shadowfalcon76
01-03-2010, 10:59 PM
Thanks everyone for your replies and suggestions. I'm going to take the time to check each of these out, see which one feels right to me, then go from there. Silent Hill allows for a lot of breathing room in which to work out a reason for people to be there and for crazy stuff to happen to them. I just need a good system to reflect the madness and dark creepyness that actually goes on there.

If anyone has any other suggestions, I'll remain open to them. Thanks again.

MortonStromgal
01-04-2010, 10:25 AM
I forgot to add nWOD has a fan based Silent Hill book. http://mrgone.rocksolidshells.com/fansups.html

shadowfalcon76
01-04-2010, 06:12 PM
Just got through looking through that material, and I have to say they did a good job on it. Looks like I'll have to get a hold of a nWoD core book and start looking into that system for my game, it seems.

Thanks.

MortonStromgal
01-04-2010, 11:20 PM
Heres nWOD in a nutt shell.

Look at one of the character sheets from mr gone's site.

take attribute+skill+gear(for example a 9mm is 2) that is the number of d10 you are going to roll. +/- any modifiers (like a kevlar vest on your opponent is -4 IIRC) and then roll you need 8,9, or 10. Count those as successes (ie damage in our example) the more successes the better. Everything works the same way. You can also add 3 dice by spending willpower and you can regain willpower by following your virtue or your vice. There is a lot of other little minor rules but those are the basics. The character sheets generally have the abbreviated character creation rules at the bottom of the sheet.

here is a common combat example, personally I think wound penalties kick in too late. But this is good if you want a bit of a cinematic feel.
Joe has a firearms of 3 and a dex of 2 plus a 9mm, he really wants to hit the cultist so hes going to spend 1 willpower for 3 more dice giving him a total of 10 dice. The cultist is wearing some cerimonial armor giving a -1 so thats 9 dice. Joe scores 3 successes (8+ on a d10) the cultist takes 3 damage. The cultist has 7 hit points though from his size 5 and 2 stamina so hes hurting but hes not out yet. He runs up and stabbs back with his knife. Dex 3 + Weaponry 2, + Knife 1 for a total of 6 dice but hes going to spend some willpower to cus he doesnt want to die today giving him 9. Joe doesnt have any armor but because its close combat he'll get his defense score of 2 (lower of dex or wits) dropping our cultist to 7 dice. He scores 2 successes but Joe has 8 hit points (size 5 + 3 stamina) so hes still in it. He squeezes off another round from the pistol scoring another 3 successes this drops our cultist to 1 hit point and he now takes a -2 to all his actions, he tries one more time but is now only at 5 dice he scores another 2 successes and while Joe is injured hes still ok so Joe fires one last time and drops our cultist.

Unknown Armies is more like Joe levels his pistol at the cultist and fires. If the cultist survived (I'd give it about a 60% chance, average pistol shot is probably 30-40 pts of damage, average hit points is probably 50) hes now at -30% to all of his skills.

fmitchell
01-05-2010, 12:56 AM
If you want to accentuate suspense and personal horror, you might look at the indie game Dread. The GM creates a questionnaire for each character, with leading questions, to define the character. When a character tries an action with an uncertain outcome, he pulls a brick from a Jenga tower; if the tower falls, he's taken out. Then the players rebuild the tower and play resumes ...

The "instant death" thing doesn't fit the Silent Hill games, but then again there's one protagonist. If you have multiple PCs, you can afford to lose a few.

Richard Littles
01-05-2010, 01:35 AM
With Hero System, character generation is point based. There are no classes nor levels. To make things easier there are package deals that are used as a starting point for characters. A package deal is like a class, but it's a small set of skills and other abilities that do not use a lot of points. Characters are designed to the exact specifications as what the player wants to play. Characters do not have alignments but do have complications that run the gamut of physical problems to rivalries to psychological problems. This makes the characters more real for players.

Characters are rated on their proficiency with anything on a 3-18 scale using 3d6. The detail in combat and realism is left up to the GM to decide what is right for their game. Everything, except weapons, use 3d6 for resolution. For combat the rolls follow the formula of 11+(Character's Offensive Combat Value)-(Target's Defensive Combat Value)+/-(Other Modifiers)=Target Number or less to hit. For example, a character with an OCV of 7 is trying to shoot a target that has a DCV of 6 and is behind partial cover needs an 11+7-6-1=11 or less to hit which occurs 62.5% of the time. Range modifiers are optional. For horror based games, there is an entire section dedicated to altering the core rules by adding in a Sanity stat or something similar. For Pulp action there's Hero Points. The rules themselves tells you the logic behind the rules and how the developers used them. It's the only system in my experience that is completely transparent for the GM and players.

Skill checks fall into two classes of being straight checks of skill rating +/- modifiers or being an opposed roll against someone else's skill or stat with the roll that has the higher margin of success wins. For example, a character wants to pick a lock with a bobby pin because they don't have a lock pick set. Their Lockpicking skill is 14 or less and since the lock is a simple deadbolt there's no penalty beyond the -2 due to the type of lock pick used. The character ultimately needs 12 or less to succeed in picking the lock.

For an opposed roll, two characters are arm wrestling and use their Strength roll which is 9+(Characteristic/5). One character has a Strength of 16 and the other has a Strength of 18. The first character needs to roll under 12 or less and the second needs to roll under 13 or less. The first character rolls a 9 on 3d6 and the second character rolls a 7. The first character makes his roll by 3 and the second character makes his roll by 6. The second character is able to move the other guy's arm towards his side of the table and is closer to winning.

Dice are reliable since the system uses a bell curve. There's no wild swings between you're hot then you're cold on the dice like a linear system. The difficulty in Hero is in the front end during character generation due to the sheer amount of options available to the entire group. In low point games it's easier to create characters since you're not messing with the Powers. In superhero/high point level games the Powers play a large role and add to the challenge. Fortunately, for new players to the Hero System there are a lot of knowledgeable folks that are willing to teach people how to play. The added bonus to the Hero System is that all you need is Hero System 6th Edition Volume 1 as a player and Volumes 1&2 as a GM. The rest of the books are completely optional and serve to make things easier for GMs and players to run a game. Setting books are completely self contained and do not make calls to other books for additional rules. The reason being is that all the rules are found in the core rulebooks and the setting book explains their implementation of those rules. Finally, Hero System can handle any genre so you only need to know one set of rules.

MortonStromgal
01-07-2010, 10:40 PM
If you want to accentuate suspense and personal horror, you might look at the indie game Dread. The GM creates a questionnaire for each character, with leading questions, to define the character. When a character tries an action with an uncertain outcome, he pulls a brick from a Jenga tower; if the tower falls, he's taken out. Then the players rebuild the tower and play resumes ...

The "instant death" thing doesn't fit the Silent Hill games, but then again there's one protagonist. If you have multiple PCs, you can afford to lose a few.


I can't believe I forgot Dread! That game is awesome but very different from the normal dice rolling.