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harmor
11-08-2009, 10:54 PM
I'm curious what experiences anyone has had with Dwarven Forge?

Here's a Youtube video showing it in action:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-rsX4KrmmFY

I tend to be a little clumsy...is this something willing to get?

Kalanth
11-09-2009, 08:00 AM
These things are awesome..ly expensive... I would love to have Dwarven Forge pieces at my table but the price of them would destroy my wallet. That and there is the fact that dungeon tiles are something you need to design for before the adventure and not while you are running it. I have a huge number of dungeon tiles that I used for the third time last night and I have owned them for a few years.

Skunkape
11-09-2009, 01:33 PM
Dwarven Forge is nice stuff as has been said by myself and others in various threads on the forum. But as Kalanth says, it's expensive, and you really need to have some kind of plan for the layout of the dungeon/buildings before you start to place the parts.

Personally, I've gone with other products including Hirst Arts molds, where you cast your own blocks, glue them together and then paint them. World Works Games, Stones Edges, Ebbles Minis and Fat Dragon Games cardstock buildings, that you print out, cut and glue together. Finally, I've made my own terrain using foamcore, extruded polystyrene, etc.

There are quite a few options available these days depending on budget/time you have/want to spend on obtaining/building.

bigironvault
11-20-2009, 07:53 AM
I've looked at other products like DF but when it comes down to it and sit down and calculate the total cost of ownership (time, materials etc). Dwarven forge is by far the best and I believe time and cost effective product you can get for this purpose.

(Obviously I'm a fan and own quite a bit DF stuff)

harmor
12-05-2009, 12:30 PM
From last night:

http://img197.imageshack.us/img197/7721/photoxg.jpg

One of the guys had a green laser and pointed it at the Gelatinous Cube Figurine.


1) Its best to have all the pieces out on the table first before starting (it comes with a map making program that will give you a manifest)

2) You have to stand up to get a Top/Down perspective to see what's happening sometimes.

WhiteTiger
12-05-2009, 03:19 PM
That is just flat out awesome. I'd like to get some dwarven forge and a lot of other stuff but I'll have to wait a few more months. :faint:

Swordnboard
12-09-2009, 11:15 AM
I wish I could afford everything... that setup looks great. I need to upgrade from my blank paper 1-inch grid...

tesral
12-10-2009, 05:44 PM
I need to upgrade my bank account.

elfinn3
12-10-2009, 07:50 PM
If you have more money than time, DF is definitely the way to go. The pieces are high quality, though you are limited in what you can build by the pieces you have. If you have more time than money, go with Hirst Arts. For less than $100 you can get everything you need to make massive, attractive, interchangable sets. It takes a lot of time to cast enough pieces to
make anything. Then more time to glue. Then more time to paint. But the result is worth it, and you aren't limited in what you can create.

Good luck!

tesral
12-10-2009, 08:48 PM
If you have more money than time, DF is definitely the way to go. The pieces are high quality, though you are limited in what you can build by the pieces you have. If you have more time than money, go with Hirst Arts. For less than $100 you can get everything you need to make massive, attractive, interchangable sets. It takes a lot of time to cast enough pieces to
make anything. Then more time to glue. Then more time to paint. But the result is worth it, and you aren't limited in what you can create.

Good luck!

I have a Hirst bridge I won at a game con. Nice piece, but yes, the building time took a while. I still have not finished painting it,

I used some of my other tools to make sure the bridge was built square. I'm glad I did.

bigironvault
12-11-2009, 10:12 AM
If you have more money than time, DF is definitely the way to go. The pieces are high quality, though you are limited in what you can build by the pieces you have. If you have more time than money, go with Hirst Arts. For less than $100 you can get everything you need to make massive, attractive, interchangable sets. It takes a lot of time to cast enough pieces to
make anything. Then more time to glue. Then more time to paint. But the result is worth it, and you aren't limited in what you can create.

Good luck!

100% agreed. The only reason why I use DF is because I have no time to do terrain. I pretty much have around 2 hrs a day to dedicate to gaming in any form, maybe even less on the weekends due to my day-job.

I pretty much did a cost/hr calculation and it didnt make sense for me to build much on my own. The problem of course is that when you start buying you can't stop!

tesral
12-11-2009, 10:25 AM
I pretty much did a cost/hr calculation and it didnt make sense for me to build much on my own. The problem of course is that when you start buying you can't stop!

And the first hit isn't free. :lol:

Swordnboard
12-11-2009, 01:09 PM
Thanks for pointing out that Hirst Arts page. As far as cost and utility goes, that's one of the better terrain modeling sites I've seen. There is indeed a high time cost though, it looks like... (sigh).
We'll have to see if the motivation to make nice terrain like that exceeds the utility of printout dungeons using Autorealm, etc.

elfinn3
12-12-2009, 12:29 PM
If you decide to go with HA, here are some tips. Get a basic wall set, either fieldstone or gothic. Get a basic 1" floor set (I like the cracked tiles). Buy some "Merlin's Magic" fro
Clintsales, and spend a few days casting pieces. Keep your pieces organized (I use a tackle box with lots of dividers). Then build a bunch of straight wall pieces. Make em 2" tall. Build a bunch of floor tiles. Glue em onto foam poster board so that they are 1/2" tall. When you build your dungeons, lay the walls down first, then but the floor pieces up to the walls to hold them in place.

When I first started, I made all kinds of corners, Ts, and X shaped walls. Then I found that I didn't use them that often. Plus I had the walls on top of the floors, so I lost floor space (I'd only have a portion of a square next to a wall). Wih straight walls, you can make a corner, T, or X, and you don't lose floor space because the floor squares are next to the walls, not under them.

This is the most efficient way to create a fully modular dungeon that I have come up with.

Cheers