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Farcaster
09-29-2009, 05:44 PM
487Want to write for games?

Think your art is ready for professional publication?

Long to be a part of the game industry, but not sure how to get your foot in the door?

Freelance writer/editor/game creator Jess Hartley shares her secrets for using conventions as an entry point into the professional game industry.

This product was inspired by a series of simple blog articles presented on Jess' website to offer her experiences and advice to potential freelancers looking to make the best use of their time during the summer 2009 convention season. The response was overwhelming, and encouraged Jess to write a more complete guide for those who would like to increase their chances of becoming a professional in the game industry.

Recently revised and updated with expanded information, helpful appendixes and more advice than ever before, Jess Hartley's Conventions for the Aspiring Game Professional is available now in PDF format for only $1.99 (http://tinyurl.com/ycqe83x). A free preview (http://tinyurl.com/ycqe83x) is also available for your perusing pleasure.

Includes 30+ pages of detailed advice and insider information about how to use conventions (and other face-to face situations) to your best advantage as an aspiring game professional.

tesral
10-01-2009, 12:49 AM
My ghodd, those are typewriter keys. Are you trying to frighten the children?

cplmac
10-01-2009, 11:02 AM
Tesral, you are assuming that the kids nowadays know what a typewriter is. I personally would have some serious doubts that most do.

JessHartley
10-01-2009, 12:28 PM
My ghodd, those are typewriter keys. Are you trying to frighten the children?

*grins*
I actually created every bit of this product myself, from the writing to the layout to the cover art - including the photography. That's from an antique typewriter that I have in a place of honor in my office.

It has a charm and aesthetic appeal that modern keyboards just can't capture, in my opinion. :)

~jess

tesral
10-01-2009, 04:34 PM
It has a charm and aesthetic appeal that modern keyboards just can't capture, in my opinion. :)

~jess

I have a Royal #2 in my garage. I'll take the computer thank you. I miss than thing not at all.

Angelus_Nox
10-02-2009, 08:58 AM
Tesral, you are assuming that the kids nowadays know what a typewriter is. I personally would have some serious doubts that most do.

People fear what they don't know
:bolt:

Anyway. I will look more closely at that once I get the time.

tesral
10-02-2009, 11:02 AM
Steampunk Mac (http://steampunkworkshop.com/daveveloz.shtml), with typewriter keys.

JessHartley
10-08-2009, 03:35 PM
That's a gorgeous steampunk keyboard/computer set up! I'd love something like that, if I didn't go through keyboards like wildfire!

I adore Steamy creations. Thanks for sharing that one!

tesral
10-08-2009, 05:17 PM
That's a gorgeous steampunk keyboard/computer set up! I'd love something like that, if I didn't go through keyboards like wildfire!

I adore Steamy creations. Thanks for sharing that one!

You need to buy good keyboards. I have one that lasted from 1995 to 2007.

JessHartley
10-08-2009, 05:35 PM
You need to buy good keyboards. I have one that lasted from 1995 to 2007.


I'm afraid it's not really the keyboards' fault.

A - Between writing for a living and using the computer almost constantly during my waking hours for recreational/PR/communication purposes, I'm afraid I give any keyboard a good work out in a very short time

and probably more importantly...

B - I have a habit of drinking soda/juice/milk while working... And I'm a clutz. :)

If I haven't broken the spring/return mechanism on some vital key through over use within a year, I'm likely to spill a drink in it and require replacement.

tesral
10-08-2009, 09:59 PM
I spilled milk in that keyboard once. Pop a couple of times. (I drink diet, sugar is nasty on electronic switches.)

Unhook the keyboard, and here is the key -- wash it. That is right, wash the thing. Pour copious amounts of water even mixed with soap into the keyboard. Rinse without reservation. Dunk the thing if you must. I have heard some people run it through the dishwasher. I've never done that and hesitate to recommend it.

Last, dry it, thoroughly. Drain it out and let it set in a warm dry place for at least 24 hours. My last one that lasted over nine years was washed at least three times.

My post activity on the forum should give you an idea how I use a keyboard. The word constantly comes to mind. I have a good sized collection of the beasts, so setting a keyboard aside to dry is not a big deal. I have a 1995 Microsoft Natural I use every day, and mostly all day.

So, I spend money on keyboards they last and they are worth washing out if they get a soaking. However if you are buying $4.95 specials at Computers-R-Us, chuck the thing and get another one.

I would not pull that keyboard mod on anything less than a very good keyboard. If i am placing that kind of effort into the looks, I want the works to last. Find a good bucking spring keyboard in fact.

:focus: