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Arkhemedes
06-19-2009, 10:45 PM
Okay, Thoth, here you go. You wanted it, you got it! These are my choices for the Greatest Modules of All Time (or at least my favorites). Of course, I can only speak for the ones I've been fortunate enough to run or play through. I picked these for their originality, variety, detail, innovative ideas, unusual and interesting environments, and good old fashioned shock value:

10) Queen of Spiders (the super-module)
9) Tomb of Horrors
8) Against the Giants (the super-module)
7) From the Shadows
6) Throne of Bloodstone
5) Temple of Elemental Evil (the super-module)
4) Castle Ruins
3) Desert of Desolation (the super-module)
2) Egg of the Phoenix
1) Ravenloft

Please feel free to laugh at my choices or add your own.

Umiushi
06-20-2009, 04:00 AM
I'm going to choose Option Two: add my own. Here's my top twenty list of favorite D&D modules, and why I like them.

If there are spoiler tags, I couldn't find them, so apologies in advance, but there are definitely some spoilers in this list.

20) A4: In the Dungeons of the Slave Lords - The party gets tossed into a giant cave complex with no equipment, no spells, and no light. Better still, the cave complex is in a mountain that's about to go boom. The myconids were awesome, as was the climactic fight against something like half a dozen bosses with your backs to a volcano.

19) Q1: Queen of the Demonweb Pits - The plot was basically find that Lolth and do her in. Mostly, the alternate universes caught my imagination, particularly the one with the dwarves' last stand, and the "reverse world" with the inky-black, poisonous unicorns.

18) A3: Assault on the Aerie of the Slave Lords - I can't remember if the party knew in advance or not whether the secret base of the Slave Lords was a full-on city. Either way, it provided a change of pace. I liked the weird caverns leading to the city, the fact that the main dungeon was the city, and, as long as you weren't playing A4, the climactic throne room fight against a group of slightly different bosses.

17) S4: Lost Caverns of Tsojcanth - With all the eldritch items and demonic foes, this is my favorite dungeon crawl, in the sense that you're basically wandering through an assortment of tunnels, caves, passages, and rooms. The wilderness encounters leading to the caverns weren't bad, either.

16) G1: Steading of the Hill Giant Chief - What really made this work for me was that you began with a very straightforward bunch of foes in the steading that you could overcome with the tactic of your choice. I've seen equally successful parties slink from room to room, or run straight into the banquet throwing fireballs in all directions. After that, fighting the orc thralls in the lower level feels like a letdown...until you start noticing the hints of weirdness down there.

15) A2: Secret of the Slavers' Stockade - Kind of like G1, this was an above-ground and below-ground, two level dungeon. The Cloakers were downright scary, below ground. Above, this had a kind of enemy town sort of feeling that actually worked for me better than the Aerie. I also remember that one rather cool mid-boss who was blind, so he wore a helmet that had no openings for the eyes.

14) T1: The Village of Hommlet - I liked the look of the village, and the rather manageable "dungeon" at the end. It had a kind of comfortable, heroism-on-a-small-scale feel to the whole thing. After that, going to Nulb, and then to the Temple of Elemental Evil, while I didn't mind it, didn't click as much as this fairly modest beginning did.

13) G2: Glacial Rift of the Frost Giant Jarl - Ice, ice, and more ice! For flavor, nothing beats playing through G1 in late autumn, and then hitting G2 when the snow starts to fall. I liked how the environment seemed to permeate the whole dungeon.

12) I2: Tomb of the Lizard King - It's been quite some time, but I remember that there was a rather well-constructed feel to the whole adventure...and that the enemies were actually scrying out the party from the get-go!

11) DL6: Dragons of Ice - Take G2 and expand it from a dungeon crawl to an epic adventure, that's Dragons of Ice. One of the key moments for me was the utter disappointment when the party reaches the Port of Tharsis and discovers that it's an inland city. There's that beautiful backs-to-the-wall feeling when the dragon army shows up, too. I mean, you're at the very tip of the continent by that point, with nowhere left to go but the polar ice cap...that's to-the-wall on a grand scale. Finally, it seemed to me that the white dragon really wanted to beat the party. Maybe that was just my own interpretation, but it felt a lot more like a grudge match than the "oh, you showed up, so now I'm gonna fight you" combat that most of the D&D boss fights seem to be, even the ones I otherwise like.

10) X1: The Isle of Dread - It was great how you could have a completely different adventure just depending on how far you chose to sail around the island before making landfall.

9) DL1: Dragons of Despair - It's a little rough in places, but for a module that successfully conveys the impression of starting out on an epic, and better still, heroic, adventure, I've yet to find one that does a better job than Dragons of Despair.

8) X5: Temple of Death - The party has to travel across an entire nation to fight its ruler. The country of Hule itself had a very central Asian feel to it, and the fact that the Master of the Desert Nomads' Temple was in the middle of a forest was neat in its own right. This module introduced some pretty memorable and horrific monsters: fungal undead, dogs that would curse you into fading away, faceless doppleganger-like warriors, and the Cthulhoid malfera.

7) DL2: Dragons of Flame - Parties often like to travel light, and take on adventures that are personal in scope. Even if you're trying to kill the Demon Queen of Spiders, who's also a lesser goddess, it still boils down to a melee in a room. When the goal is to rescue the population of a small town's worth of prisoners, both adults and children, and do it while being chased by an entire army, the PCs may look at what it means to be heroic in a new light.

6) D3: Vault of the Drow - After five straight modules of dungeon crawling, the party is rewarded with one of the most unique and sinisterly beautiful settings in the history of D&D modules. The demented fairlyland of the Vault, with its weird minerals, mushroom fields, and radioactive "moon," is certainly the first thing I think of when people mention the Underdark.

5) D1: Descent into the Depths of the Earth - This is the highest module on my list that lacks any wilderness component, though you can argue that the underground "wilderness" of the Underdark makes up the entire module. I don't recall if the term was introduced here, or came into being much later with the "Dungeoneer's Survival Guide," but this is the very module that brought the concept of the Underdark itself to D&D. Perhaps the best thing about it is when the scale becomes apparent to the PCs. They've traveled through miles and miles of tunnels, and even though they know that the threat is the newly-discovered drow, they have absolutely no idea how many weeks or months they have to spend traveling through this ultimate dungeon before they get to their enemies.

4) X2: Castle Amber - The first half, wandering through an oversized castle because you were arbitrarily trapped by an infinite expanse of poisonous mist, is not the greatest idea that has ever been made into a dungeon module. It's when you realize that the castle itself is just a gateway to the Land of Averoigne that the adventure really blossoms.

3) DL 10: Dragons of Dreams - This module featured the most mind-bending, but internally-consistent, twist of any I have read. The final battle is a true nightmare for both the party and the DM, but it's solidly in the top three most epic fights of the whole series.

2) B2: The Keep on the Borderlands - This is my choice for the best introductory module, ever. You've got a base town of sorts, a wilderness, and a dungeon complex that's my main source of mental imagery when anyone mentions D&D.

1) DL12: Dragons of Faith - A campaign packed into a dungeon module, Dragons of Faith represented another quantum leap in adventure design, and remains one that I've yet to see surpassed. This is the only module where I also read the 2nd edition version, and I have one word for that effort: lobotomy. This module represented the height of first edition dungeon modules: a huge master encounter matrix; dozens of outlines for side adventures including dungeons with lists of the major monster encounters, traps, treasures, and features; a suitably epic main plot that takes the PCs across wilderness, urban, underwater, shipboard, and of course dungeon settings; a Battlesystem fight; and its own set of mini-games!

Call me old-fashioned, but it's really the AD&D 1st edition and "classic" D&D modules that stand out in my mind. I've read a smattering of adventures from 2nd through 4th edition, and they just don't have that ground-breaking, exciting thrill I got from the old ones.

So back to you, Arkhemedes. Care to talk about why you chose your top picks, and maybe share a little bit of the plot outlines?

Arkhemedes
06-20-2009, 09:24 AM
Wow, great job Umiushi! Yeah, had I listed 20 I would have definitely included the Lost Caverns and the Slave lords. Never got to do the Lizard King or any Dragon Lance modules so I'll have to take your word on them. Have to say I was a bit disappointed with Keep on the Borderlands though. But this might have to do with the fact that I was a player in it rather than DM as usual and we waltzed through pretty easily.

As for why I picked what I did - I went for the super-modules rather than the individual modules because they were all inclusive and I wouldn't have to expand the list to 20 as you did. Plus the super modules had extra material in them that the individual ones did not. As for the rest:

Queen of Spiders - This one might have been higher on the list but for the fact that I wasn't crazy about some of the things at the end in the Abyss. Although it made for great adventuring, the design of the Demon Web (kind of a Celtic pattern on steroids) did not seem to be particularly believable, or that fact that Lolth allows the party waltz into her lair so freely, nor the idea of a spider-ship thingy. But I liked the rest for the same reasons as you.
Tomb of Horrors - Simply the fact that it was the first to have a picture book for the players to see was enough to include it here but also because of its deadly traps and unique (at the time) monsters.
Against the Giants - As you said, great monster bashing in cool environments.
From the Shadows - Starts with a horrific beginning, then your forced to travel back in time to witness the birth of Ravenloft by one of its biggest badies, then you escape and get to trash his castle!
Throne of Bloodstone - A more believable version of the Abyss than the Demon Webs and for high level adventuring its the tops. Take on Orcus, Tiamat and depending on your luck (and the DM) several other Demon Lords and Lesser Gods!
Temple of Elemental Evil - This is my choice for an introductory module. Very detailed and very open ended.
Castle Ruins - This is a huge, very detailed dungeon with a lot of really cool stuff inside. This one module can take a very low-level party up to 20th level easily and then gives launching points into other worlds.
Desert of Desolation - Everything you ever wanted in a desert/Egyptian style adventure. Great dungeons, great environments, mystery solving, alternate world exploring and surprises.
Egg of the Phoenix - Variety, variety, variety! Lots of cool places to go, time-travel, mystery-solving, and unique environments. There's something in this module for everyone and every style of play (particularly if there's a paladin in the group). Also has a great, behind the scenes, story-line for the DM's enjoyment. The only drawback as far as I am concerned is that it occupies a large amount of land space but is not placed in a particular setting.
Ravenloft - I am a big Ravenloft fan and this is the module responsible for an entire campaign setting. In addition to a great story, great feel and environment, it also has the unique fortune-telling device which helps to dictate certain elements of the adventure and adds to the flavor.

templeorder
06-20-2009, 09:58 AM
1) Keep on the Borderlands
2) Secret of Bone Hill
3) Mast of the Desert Nomads
4) cult of the Reptile God
5) Slave Pits of the Undercity
6) sinister Secret of Salt Marsh
7) Eye of the Serpent
8) Horror on the Hill
9) [Against the Giants]
10) Dwellers of the Forbidden City

Arch Lich Thoth-Amon
06-20-2009, 10:08 AM
I have such fond memories of many of these modules listed. One day i hope to either play or run them once again. Let's hope.

If i cant find find a group(which shouldn't be to hard to do), then i will just run them myself and write a novel per adventure with all the characters present.

I've played many modules since the 1970's, but for me, it would be "the AD&D 1st edition and classic" D&D modules that stand out in my mind, as well.

The GDQ1-7 series started off my love for the Underdark.

Thoth would like to be more verbose, but his morning needs to be rebooted. Thoth is going to lay back down.

5-Star Thread, btw. Thoth will be checking back often.

agoraderek
06-21-2009, 08:06 AM
1) N1 Cult of the Reptile God (favorite all time module)
2) A1-4 Slavers series
3) GDQ Omnibus
4) I1 Dwellers of the Forbidden City
5) U1 Sinister Secret of Salt Marsh
6) S1 Tomb of Horrors
7) X4 Masterof the Desert Nomads
8) Dungeon Issue 112 Maure Castle
9) Paizo Adventure Path Rise of the Runelords
10) The Mud Sorcerer's Tomb (Dungeon Magazine, forget which issue)

Arkhemedes
06-21-2009, 08:34 AM
1) N1 Cult of the Reptile God (favorite all time module)
2) A1-4 Slavers series
3) GDQ Omnibus
4) I1 Dwellers of the Forbidden City
5) U1 Sinister Secret of Salt Marsh
6) S1 Tomb of Horrors
7) X4 Masterof the Desert Nomads
8) Dungeon Issue 112 Maure Castle
9) Paizo Adventure Path Rise of the Runelords
10) The Mud Sorcerer's Tomb (Dungeon Magazine, forget which issue)
Wow, I must say that I'm really a bit surprised to see The Secret of Salt Marsh listed for the second time. You guys thought it was that good huh? I used it a few years back to start off a Ravenloft campaign. Thought it was okay. But top ten? Really?

Did the Mud Sorcerer's Tomb also. Not bad. But like anything taken from Dungeon magazine, a bit short for a top ten module, I think. Just my opinion though.

templeorder
06-21-2009, 09:59 AM
Oh holy cow, i fi include Dungeon... i might actually have to think about this one. Tallows Deep would be #1 dungeon adv. for me.

Salt MArsh was an awesome setting and classic adventure - a haunted house, a mystery, smugglers, it introduced some powerful critters (gnolls) and introduced the use of coordinated attack and magic against the party. It was a complex module that had many elements put together well, and its was the breeze that turned into a hurricane (u2, u3... which were a bit much really)

Arch Lich Thoth-Amon
06-21-2009, 11:13 AM
There was another cool Dragon Magazine module that included Githyanki and their silver sword. Don't recall the name, but it would fit in this thread. Anyone recall the Dragon Magazine scenario i speak of?

Arkhemedes
06-21-2009, 12:09 PM
Was it Dragon magazine or Dungeon? I think I know what you're talking of. Finding it is another matter though.

Wait, I think I found it. It's an FR module full of mini-adventures called Tales of the Outer Planes.

nijineko
06-21-2009, 12:16 PM
that the one where they lost it and come looking for it?

agoraderek
06-22-2009, 08:28 AM
that the one where they lost it and come looking for it?

Yeah, it was in Dragon before Dungeon existed as a publication, actually. Can't remember the name offhand, though.

Arch Lich Thoth-Amon
06-22-2009, 08:35 AM
that the one where they lost it and come looking for it?
I believe so. Ran many adventures where out of nowhere Githyanki parties would attack our party to get their sword back, usually at the worse times. What a way to test our skill and preparedness.

RoryN
06-22-2009, 12:32 PM
The group I originally played with, and the off-shoot one later, didn't use a lot of modules, so my list is only made up of 8 choices.

#8: White Plume Mountain-a little change of pace after (hopefully) surviving the Tomb of Horrors.

#7: Assault on the Aerie of the Slave Lords-I think this was on of the first all city adventures I ever played.


#6: Lost Caverns of Tsojcanth-great underground adventure with some wilderness encounters tossed in on the way.


#5: In the Dungeons of the Slave Lords-seperate the party from their equipment and see how good they are? Brilliant!


#4: Tomb of Horrors-Gygax at his "deadly" best. The thought of possible instant death scared our group more than anything.


#3: Treasure Hunt-maybe I'm partial to lower level stuff, but I felt this was the best way to introduce new players to the game and it's mechanics.


#2: Keep on the Borderlands-one of the best low-level modules ever as it had a bit of everything.


#1: Ravenloft-I mentioned in another thread, when this is run by a good DM, it's awesome!

Arch Lich Thoth-Amon
06-22-2009, 12:39 PM
My goal, one day, is to play all these modules (and more--all classics) in a campaign. Of course, i will have to slow down the level progression a bit and fudge things a little, but always thought it would be great to get a consistent group together and play a "classic" super campaign.

FYI: I'm moving to San Antonio, Tx., next spring. Anyone want to secure yourself a weekly or bi-monthly slot now (or just express interest)? Rules knowledge doesn't matter, all i require is reliability and a genuine interest for fun. I'm willing to drive an hour or two if need be. I'm that serious about it. Let me know.

I'd love to DM the whole thing, but am not against another that has his or her sights on running a few. It's all about the fun, after all.

Apologies for the threadjack, Arkhemedes, now... :focus:

Arkhemedes
06-22-2009, 12:48 PM
My goal, one day, is to play all these modules (and more--all classics) in a campaign. Of course, i will have to slow down the level progression a bit and fudge things a little, but always thought it would be great to get a consistent group together and play a "classic" super campaign.

FYI: I'm moving to San Antonio, Tx., next spring. Anyone want to secure yourself a weekly or bi-monthly slot now (or just express interest)? Rules knowledge doesn't matter, all i require is reliability and a genuine interest for fun. I'm willing to drive an hour or two if need be. I'm that serious about it. Let me know.

I'd love to DM the whole thing, but am not against another that has his or her sights on running a few. It's all about the fun, after all.

Apologies for the threadjack, Arkhemedes, now... :focus:
No problem Thoth. Guess a 3 or 4 hour drive to Dallas is out of the question though huh?

...And now back to topic!!!

Arch Lich Thoth-Amon
06-22-2009, 12:50 PM
If we can find someone midpoint, it could easily work, Arkhemedes. Of course, the midpoint player wouldnt have to drive, how cool is that for him or her.

Okay, :focus: for real, this time. :biggrin:

Razmus
06-22-2009, 01:17 PM
Temple of Elemental Evil - This is my choice for an introductory module. Very detailed and very open ended.
Egg of the Phoenix - Variety, variety, variety! Lots of cool places to go, time-travel, mystery-solving, and unique environments. There's something in this module for everyone and every style of play (particularly if there's a paladin in the group). Also has a great, behind the scenes, story-line for the DM's enjoyment. The only drawback as far as I am concerned is that it occupies a large amount of land space but is not placed in a particular setting.
I loved Village of Hommlet, and snapped up the Temple years later. :-)

I thought Egg of the Pheonix was set on a continent far to the east of Greyhawk proper.

Of course my all time favorite for introducing players is still B2.

And my favorite cross-genre module was Expedition to Barrier Peak.

Arkhemedes
06-22-2009, 01:28 PM
I loved Village of Hommlet, and snapped up the Temple years later. :-)

I thought Egg of the Pheonix was set on a continent far to the east of Greyhawk proper.

Of course my all time favorite for introducing players is still B2.

And my favorite cross-genre module was Expedition to Barrier Peak.
It is possible that The Egg of the Phoenix was placed there by somebody and could very well be placed on the other side of the Solnor Ocean. But I don't believe it says so in the module and as far as I can recall, I have never seen any maps of this continent. I've also read that one of the main NPCs of the module at some point ended up in the Forgotten Realms and is mentioned in the Savage Frontiers accessory.

Razmus
06-22-2009, 06:21 PM
It is possible that The Egg of the Phoenix was placed there by somebody and could very well be placed on the other side of the Solnor Ocean. But I don't believe it says so in the module and as far as I can recall, I have never seen any maps of this continent. I've also read that one of the main NPCs of the module at some point ended up in the Forgotten Realms and is mentioned in the Savage Frontiers accessory.

Ah... see, this is what happens when I don't brush up on these old modules for a few decades. It was R-4 "DOC'S ISLAND", which bears the subtitle, "Epologue to module R-3 THE EGG OF THE PHEONIX" (and has most of the same characters (Zanzibar apparently dies during the R-3 adventure), mostly advanced one level) which bears the following paragraph: (p4)
"This adventure takes place on the planet Oerth, in a small territory about 5,000 miles east of the continent knock as Oerik. Man lives here in a state of chaos, somewhat different from the societies fond in other lands. (See the WORLDS OF GREYHAWKTM Gazetteer and the regional map, on the inside cover, to best understand the following details.)"

The town of Northending, which is where the Egg of the Pheonix begins is on the overland map printed for Doc's Island, across which, presumably the players have to deliver the Egg.

Looking at a few notes folks have left about the reprint, it looks like someone might have edited out the location for the modules for the reprint. *shrug* My Forgotten Realms lore is practically non-existent. It was a campaign occasionally eluded to, but I don't believe any supplements had been released for it when I packed up my gaming material to concentrate on my studies. :redface:

Arkhemedes
06-22-2009, 07:17 PM
Thanks for the info Razmus. Very interesting. All this time I had no idea. I'll have to look into this. I'm wondering if this was anything like the H series. H1, which launches the Battle System rules by Douglas Niles was not given a specific setting in which it takes place. But when they came out with H2, H3, and H4, they decided to retroactively place it in the Forgotten Realms. They even had to remove part of a glacier on the Realms map in order to do this. Could be they did the same for Egg of the Phoenix?

Oh, and by the way, it was Doc, I believe that supposedly winds up in the Realms. But I really need to check that to make sure. Like you, it's been a long time.

agoraderek
06-23-2009, 04:28 AM
If we can find someone midpoint, it could easily work, Arkhemedes. Of course, the midpoint player wouldnt have to drive, how cool is that for him or her.

Okay, :focus: for real, this time. :biggrin:

Houston's three hours from San Antonio and four hours from Dallas.

Just sayin'...

Oldgamer
06-23-2009, 08:40 AM
I loved Village of Hommlet, and snapped up the Temple years later. :-)



I only recently had the chance to play the mod in a PbP. I had a pretty cool Paladin (as cool as Paladin's can be anyway) and we had received word that our friend went missing, blah blah, then we were confronting the blue dragon in an abandoned building of some sort when the DM disappeared :( I think I still have the Pally somewhere ...

Nikodemos (called Torch)
07-15-2009, 01:33 PM
Great thread u started here Ark.

Like urself, Im pretty biased on Ravenloft being the best module Ive played. I love The Egg of the Phoenix as well, and my only regret is that they didnt follow it up with more modules set in that setting. The Tangg-Lord and his minions still stood at the end, and to me that was sloppy ending to the mod after defeating The One (aka Doc) and watching him being banished to the Realms by a titan. I particularly like how u created ur own, and "finished" that module urself by allowing ur party to attack the citadel of the evil overlord. Was an epic battle.

For myself, Ill list the top ten I like as well to keep on topic.

1. Castle Ravenloft (of course--I love gothic horror and such)
2. Queen of the Demonweb Pits (this supermodule had characters facing giants, drow, demons, and even Llolth herself. What I wouldnt give to take that Spidership into Spelljamming..lol)
3. Temple of Elemental Evil (Opens with the Village of Hommelet--a great intro mod, then pits u into a historic dungeon crawl that is both challenging and epic in the end)
4. The Slave Lord supermodule (just a great mod taking players across the Wild Coast and Pomarj. I particularly love the sections when the characters are captured early on, and then again later). Those really challenge ur playing ability, imagination, and patience. Plus the final confrontation with the Slave Lords themselves are an epic battle, and worthy of playing these).
5. Egg of the Phoenix (One of the most original modules Ive ever DMd or played. Sadly, nothing more was ever developed for that setting, nor was the final battle against evil ever won)
6. Castle Ruins (Best dungeon crawl ever, I think. Of course Im biased as this mod was the setting for my favorite character, Nikodemos--an evil Zhent priest of Cyric, who later went dual classed as a mage to become a lich at the end. Ark did a superb job of blending a basic dungeon delve into an epic evil campaign, ripe with the Black Network politics, clashes with Harpers, u name it)
7. Bloodstone modules (originally set in Greyhawk, but the last three relocated the series to the Realms. I love this series simply cuz it has a bit of everything. Politics (even a romantic liason to draw the party into these politics), The Grandfather of Assassins and his training grounds, battlesystem wars, The Witch-King, and finally on towards the Abyss, Tiamat, Orcus, etc. It just never stops getting tougher. Awesome series)
8. Tomb of Horror (Gygax's deadliest mod ever, and one every player fears after they go thru it)
9. Desert of Desolation (this series, I never got to finish--the DM quit playing for personal reasons--but what I got to play was simply killer.)
10. Lendore Island mods (Secret of Bone Hill and Assassins Knot I think they were called)--great low level intro mods ripe with unique undead, mystery, and intrigue. Played together, they can provide a sound base for beginning a great campaign)

There are many, many more mods I could select (especially Ravenloft mods), including the I series (Ravager of Time), the UKG ones (think the Gauntlet was the first one)....however, my favorites are listed above.

Arkhemedes
07-16-2009, 07:51 PM
Ah, great minds think alike, Torch. Of course, having discussed this very topic on more than one occasion over the course of many years probably has something to do with why you and I agree on 8 out of 10 for the top ten modules. Only 3 out of the 10 however did you play as a player in my campaign (one of which, QoDW, the roles were reversed a few years before).

One thing that stands out to me in your top ten though is Desert of Desolation, a module that you never ran as a DM and never got to finish as a player, and most amazing of all is that it was being DMd by Mike of the "Reaper" fame (see Knights of the Dinner Table thread), who I know for a fact was screwing it up because he asked me for advice on it. And you still put it in the top ten! Man. too bad you didn't get to finish it - the second half is every bit as good as the first! Ooooh! How's that for rubbin' it it? :lol:

Nikodemos (called Torch)
07-17-2009, 05:19 PM
LOL...thats just WRONG, Ark, to rub that in. Especially in lieu of the fact u KNOW I want to play this mod so badly.

Its one of the few old mods I never got to finish or even run. Perhaps I can find a competent DM and group that hasnt already been thru it, and join in if they are in my area. Its my only real hope of actually getting to experience them.

Arkhemedes
07-17-2009, 05:31 PM
LOL...thats just WRONG, Ark, to rub that in. Especially in lieu of the fact u KNOW I want to play this mod so badly.

Its one of the few old mods I never got to finish or even run. Perhaps I can find a competent DM and group that hasnt already been thru it, and join in if they are in my area. Its my only real hope of actually getting to experience them.
Well, having run the thing twice, which took about six months both times, I could practically run it in my sleep. Unfortunately, besides the fact that you now live hundreds of miles away, I'm not really interested in running it a third time. :(

Nikodemos (called Torch)
07-24-2009, 11:00 AM
Ill just have to find someone close by me here to run it now.