PDA

View Full Version : What's your longest running campaign?



Arch Lich Thoth-Amon
06-03-2009, 07:45 PM
What's your longest running campaign? Which rpg/s, as a player or DM?

I've seen others on these boards and other boards mention campaigns that have ran for 5, 10, even 15+ years, and i am envious. I would give my left arm for a campaign that lasted--consistently--for over a decade.

So, please, everyone, please list your longest running campaign/s and the specific rpg/s.

Here are mine:

1) DnD (2E?) campaign that lasted 5 years.
2) Traveller CT campaign that lasted, well, a bit over 6 years.

Those were the best of times. :D

What share the rest of you?

Webhead
06-03-2009, 08:16 PM
Longest consistent campaign I've run: Star Wars D6, approximately 2 full years. The game only ended because one of the 4 players moved away and another followed a few months later. Otherwise this game probably would have gone on for at least another 12 to 18 months.

Longest consistent campaign I've played in: D&D 3E, approximately 2 full years. Campaign took us from level 1 to 20 and was supposed to go into Epic levels but the DM and one other player graduated college and moved away for work.

I believe the D&D campaign lasted slightly longer (2 or 3 months) than my Star Wars campaign.

Windstar
06-03-2009, 10:05 PM
Longest campaign was Dragonlance, 3.5 years.

All the others where usually a year or less.

Windstar
:cool::cool:

Dytrrnikl
06-04-2009, 12:58 AM
I can't take credit for this one, mainly due to the fact that I'm a player in it, however, it's a WEG d6 Star Wars campaign that began not long after 2E Star Wars from WEG was released. WE still get together to play this one, though over the last 3 or 4 years its been relegated to holiday events. So, take out the last 3 or 4 years and it's a campaign that has been running for over 12 years - using Force points are painful :p

AS for my own games, the longest was a 2E DnD campaign that lasted for just under 2 years.

Jace_Bel
06-04-2009, 02:40 AM
what happens in a campaign that runs for 2 years and more? i'm having trouble imagining that. well 2 years isn't that hard but all the way to 5, 6 and 12 years. longest campaign i've ever been in was 3 months

Dark
06-04-2009, 03:06 PM
DM
1. AD&D Nine Hells Campaign 13 years.
2. AD&D Conan 11 years.

Played
1. 2nd AD&D Forgotten Realms 8 years.
2. CoC I think it was 4th that went 6 years.
3. VtM 5 years.

templeorder
06-04-2009, 04:37 PM
Star Frontiers - still going really, we did not officially end it and i got players still wanting to pick it up again. Began in 1990 - gone through hundreds of game years.

Otherwise, ADnD, 1988-1998 (saw transition from 1e to 2e; characters now dead and legends in current game world)

mjungledog
06-04-2009, 09:22 PM
Back in the nineties, I was involved in a 2nd ed AD&D campaign that lasted about 5 years.

My current D&D campaign has been going on for about four years.

Webhead
06-04-2009, 10:21 PM
what happens in a campaign that runs for 2 years and more? i'm having trouble imagining that. well 2 years isn't that hard but all the way to 5, 6 and 12 years. longest campaign i've ever been in was 3 months

Frequency of play is also a factor to consider. The more often a group meets, the more ground they cover in terms of advancing characters and plot lines. Most "regular" campaigns that I've run or played in generally occured twice a month. That means 1 year of real time was roughly equivalent to 24 sessions. That's still a lot of adventuring, but not nearly as much as a group that meets for the same game once a week or more.

And in my campaign's case...it was Star Wars. You can never run out of adventure ideas in Star Wars. It's a galaxy of a billion habitable worlds...and all the (not so) empty space inbetween. :)

Inquisitor Tremayne
06-04-2009, 11:01 PM
I have been playing with the same group of guys for almost 5 years now. We have had a new player join and leave every now and then but for the most part we have a solid core group.

We play every other Sunday D&D 3.5 and every Tuesday we alternate Star Wars Saga games, one I GM and one the D&D GMs.

We have been playing my SW game since Saga came out, 2007(?) and we have been playing the current D&D game for about a year now I think.

We had a D&D game going, ended at 9th level with a TPK. That one was a mess because we had an old campaign (at least 5 years old) and we were all new players, all the original players eventually dropped. So our characters weren't really tied to the story in any significant way. We then started with the Age of Worms campaign and that ended in a TPK at 3rd level. We have been continuing the AoW game with new 4th level characters and are now 6th level. So far so good.

tesral
06-05-2009, 01:12 AM
The Greyhawke Campaign in it's 33 year and counting. It started as 0e D&D and as evolved though the editions. The flavor of the world does not change, even if the system evolves.

Jace_Bel
06-05-2009, 01:56 AM
Frequency of play is also a factor to consider. The more often a group meets, the more ground they cover in terms of advancing characters and plot lines. Most "regular" campaigns that I've run or played in generally occured twice a month. That means 1 year of real time was roughly equivalent to 24 sessions. That's still a lot of adventuring, but not nearly as much as a group that meets for the same game once a week or more.ok i thought you guys were playing atleast once a week for ll these consecutive years


And in my campaign's case...it was Star Wars. You can never run out of adventure ideas in Star Wars. It's a galaxy of a billion habitable worlds...and all the (not so) empty space inbetween. :)
i get that but what about your characters. shouldn't they be topped out where levels are concerned

deathboy
06-05-2009, 04:29 PM
My Sandbox campaign was started in 1997 as a 2nd Ed game. The game went on for 3 years and then I took a break for about 4 years and went back to it as a 3.5 game and that went for another 2 and a half years.

I think I should actually place some digital notes about it before my brain leaks the info and the paper work all disappears.

drewshi
06-06-2009, 06:00 AM
I'd have to say a Dragonlance campaign I ran back in college. Since we were all off at different colleges, we could only play during breaks, but we went through the entire first edition series of modules and then campaigned beyond that for about three and a half years. Right now, my current campaign has just celebrated it's one year anniversary.

Baldwin Stonewood
06-06-2009, 09:44 AM
I'm currently playing in two games that each started around December 2006. I joined both games in Feb/Mar of 2007. A fellow member of this site is running one of those games and in fact, we game tonight. We have had a few players come and go or occasionally, take a hiatus but they are consistent games. We play each homebrew campaign once per month.

I Dm'd a game (an expanded version of the Shattered Gates of Slaughtergarde module) for nearly 2 years (playing every other week) before I halted it to start my current pirate/seabased campaign.

Webhead
06-06-2009, 02:55 PM
...i get that but what about your characters. shouldn't they be topped out where levels are concerned...

Not nearly. That's one of the things I like about Star Wars D6 and many other skill-based game system I've played as opposed to "level-based" games. Yes, some of the characters had a few exceptional skills based on their specialties but there are so many different skills (and just about all of them important in their own way) that they tended to spread their experience points out a little to cover other things their characters were developing. By the end of the 2 years that we played, even a basic stormtrooper could still potentially threaten them and there were many NPCs who were considerably more experienced (and thus skilled) than they were, both allies and enemies.

As opposed to games like D&D, there is no "power up" that happens where your character gets a bit better at everything. Only the skills that you use and train will increase, so a non-combat PC who never opts to increase his combat skills (which costs experience that he might want to spend on other skills) will still be as vulnerable in a fight after 20 sessions as he was in the first adventure.

Jace_Bel
06-06-2009, 06:25 PM
Not nearly. That's one of the things I like about Star Wars D6 and many other skill-based game system I've played as opposed to "level-based" games. Yes, some of the characters had a few exceptional skills based on their specialties but there are so many different skills (and just about all of them important in their own way) that they tended to spread their experience points out a little to cover other things their characters were developing. By the end of the 2 years that we played, even a basic stormtrooper could still potentially threaten them and there were many NPCs who were considerably more experienced (and thus skilled) than they were, both allies and enemies.

As opposed to games like D&D, there is no "power up" that happens where your character gets a bit better at everything. Only the skills that you use and train will increase, so a non-combat PC who never opts to increase his combat skills (which costs experience that he might want to spend on other skills) will still be as vulnerable in a fight after 20 sessions as he was in the first adventure.
some it sounds kinda silly. sounds like a game rife with multi-classing nightmares

Webhead
06-06-2009, 10:53 PM
some it sounds kinda silly. sounds like a game rife with multi-classing nightmares

Not at all. Saying that would be like saying that all skill-based systems are "multi-classing nightmares". Systems like World of Darkness, GURPS, Savage Worlds, Unisystem, Call of Cthulhu, etc. It's all the same sort of design: Your character is a collection of skills. You have a limited number of points to spend and, based on your character concept, you put your points into the skills that make the most sense.

If you've never played a non-level based system, it might take a little time to understand how systems like D6 work.

Jace_Bel
06-07-2009, 02:55 AM
Not at all. Saying that would be like saying that all skill-based systems are "multi-classing nightmares". Systems like World of Darkness, GURPS, Savage Worlds, Unisystem, Call of Cthulhu, etc. It's all the same sort of design: Your character is a collection of skills. You have a limited number of points to spend and, based on your character concept, you put your points into the skills that make the most sense.

If you've never played a non-level based system, it might take a little time to understand how systems like D6 work.
i've played world of darkness. what i'm saying is that realistically there has to be point where a character peaks and can go no more. i don't want to play a game to the point where all the characters pretty much become gods or clones of each other

MortonStromgal
06-07-2009, 12:48 PM
Shadowrun 3e in college went for a bit over a year about 50 or so sessions

Webhead
06-08-2009, 01:14 AM
i've played world of darkness. what i'm saying is that realistically there has to be point where a character peaks and can go no more. i don't want to play a game to the point where all the characters pretty much become gods or clones of each other

Okay, we're on the same level then. I probably just wasn't explaining myself very well.

Over the course of my Star Wars campaign, none of the characters became anywhere near "god-like" or even "masterful" in skill or power. Most of them, while well skilled in certain specialties, were still pretty normal people as far as PCs go.

Likewise, since each character was built around a different concept and had different skills that they liked to use, none of them became like "clones" of the others. Each had their own particular talents to bring to the table. One guy was a good pilot, one was good at fixing things, one was a skilled con man and negotiator, etc. They worked well together and there was no character that out-shined the others.

It was one of the most fun campaigns I've run. I can thank some excellent players for that as well.

Jace_Bel
06-08-2009, 05:31 AM
Okay, we're on the same level then. I probably just wasn't explaining myself very well.

Over the course of my Star Wars campaign, none of the characters became anywhere near "god-like" or even "masterful" in skill or power. Most of them, while well skilled in certain specialties, were still pretty normal people as far as PCs go.

Likewise, since each character was built around a different concept and had different skills that they liked to use, none of them became like "clones" of the others. Each had their own particular talents to bring to the table. One guy was a good pilot, one was good at fixing things, one was a skilled con man and negotiator, etc. They worked well together and there was no character that out-shined the others.

It was one of the most fun campaigns I've run. I can thank some excellent players for that as well.
k i think i'll try turning my group on to star wars when our d&d campaign is over. yeah d&d is awesome but there is a whole world of other games out there and whole new ways of being heroes

Webhead
06-08-2009, 08:08 PM
k i think i'll try turning my group on to star wars when our d&d campaign is over. yeah d&d is awesome but there is a whole world of other games out there and whole new ways of being heroes

Very cool. Let me know how it goes if you do. And just to be clear, the game I'm talking about is most often referred to as Star Wars D6. It was published by West End Games and is now out of print and thus a little tricky to get ahold of. See the link below for clarification:

Star Wars D6: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0874314356/ref=nosim/waynesworldof-20

I only mention this to avoid confusing it with Star Wars d20 or Star Wars Saga Edition, both of which were published by Wizards of the Coast.

Star Wars Saga Edition is a good game as well, but it is based off of the d20 system and is thus a "level-based" game and is not the game I'm referring to.

Star Wars Saga Edition: http://www.amazon.com/Star-Wars-Roleplaying-Game-Rulebook/dp/0786943564/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1244509599&sr=1-1

cigamnogard
06-09-2009, 07:46 PM
Shadowrun - still waiting to play the next game/session. Played consistantly once a week for a month. Then the DM moved away...14 years ago.
Battletech/Mechwarrior - numerous campaigns with the longest a year and a month and the shortest one month.
Earthdawn - lasted six months...and then D & D 3.0 cane out.
D & D - as a DM my longest campaign was 2.5 years and would have continued but it fell apart after one critical player moved away.
- as a player the longest campaign was a year and a half but the same group and same DM --> we lasted about three years.
LARP - Sabbat - lasted eight months or so before suffering a "reboot". We left as the same issues were going to resurface.
LARP - Camirilla - created a charcter; and hope to play but not likely that will happen.
Palytesting DM monsters - starts tomorrow night.

Arkhemedes
06-10-2009, 07:50 AM
My Ravenloft campaign I have run every year for 4 to 5 months in the fall and this fall will make it 17 consecutive years in a row. I also have a Forgotten Realms campaign and a Greyhawk campaign that have been going on for about the same amount of time though they are not run every year and the characters have changed numerous times.

gajenx
06-10-2009, 10:22 AM
The longest game I was ever in as a PC was for a 3.0 that bled into 3.5 rules as the system got updated. That one lasted for about 18 months where we played every other weekend.

The longest running game I have been in as a GM was a Runequest campaign I ran. The game went on about 2 and a half years. As the group started with a save our town to save the country and prevent other national issues in domino affects. So not a big Save the world to start but was building up to it. Then players moved away as they graduated college and got jobs in other cities and states.

Moritz
06-10-2009, 10:55 AM
I started my Marvel Super Heroes game back in 1988. It's gone through two system changes (Hero/Champions and then back to MSHRPG), but it's been the same world from day one.

I started my D&D 'world' back in 79ish. But it's had so many different aspects I cannot say that it's the same game since then. However, there have been common NPCs, locations, items, and themes.

Jace_Bel
06-11-2009, 03:06 AM
So not a big Save the world to start but was building up to it. Then players moved away as they graduated college and got jobs in other cities and states.
i actually prefer not saving the world though. i think it's more of a challenge for a GM to present a conflict that is world shaking without having to actually shake the world.

WhiteTiger
07-08-2009, 11:19 AM
I had a 3rd edition Shadowrun campaign that lasted almost 2 years.

I am going to be starting up an Al-Qadim type campaign loosely based on Pathfinder's Legacy of fire / Katapesh / Osirion / Qadira books but still
using 3.5 rules. I hope this will go about 2 years. Thankfully, I have all the
players that I need and it doesn't look like anyone is going anywhere.

WCRPG Butcher
07-08-2009, 02:58 PM
The current game I'm in started about in 1995, been quite a few campaigns, but the current one we're finishing has been going since I think 2004, though the hints and preludes started in 2002. So yeah, 5 years give or take.

WhiskeyFur
07-09-2009, 07:15 PM
Had a couple long lasting games but nothing too extraordinary, unless you take into account the place it was ran.

US navy, 10 years, 2.5 of it on ship and in that time we had a star wars game going. When we were in port, maybe one game every two weeks, depending on watch schedules. But when we were out to sea it was every DAY, 6 hours at a stretch. there's little else to do except look over the railing at blue featureless ocean....

Played mainly star wars (WEG), and we had some pretty powerful characters by the time the ship went into the yard to be decommissioned. We figured that it was appropiate that our pocket destroyer was decommissioned in game even as our helo carrier was decommissioned in real life.

I figure if the sessions were spaced out to once a week like everyone else, then we probably had a 14 year game going in the space of 2.

USS New Orleans (http://www.lph11.com/), LPH-11, 3 feb 68 - 1 oct 97
She's now an artifical reef in the deep ocean.

Herr_Alvaro
07-13-2009, 09:08 AM
hi all...
3 years and counting.
Men I would love to see the character level of those who have been playing for 15 years :)
best regards

MuslixtheMighty
07-22-2009, 09:38 AM
Long Campaign I have played in: V:tM*, 2 years.

(*Being Sabbat can be so much fun!)

outrider
08-02-2009, 11:33 PM
I have been running my setting since 1980, there have been different campaigns within the setting. I have had campaigns of 5 years, 4 years, 4 years, 3 years that I can remember. The setting changes ages with each edition of D&D, 1st age was original D&D, 2nd age AD&D 1st, 3rd age AD&D 2nd, 4 age D&D 3-3.5, 5th age 3.5+.

The second age games ran from 1989 to 2000 with two different groups 2x a month each. 2000-2008 two different groups also.

tesral
08-03-2009, 01:27 AM
I have been running my setting since 1980, there have been different campaigns within the setting. I have had campaigns of 5 years, 4 years, 4 years, 3 years that I can remember. The setting changes ages with each edition of D&D, 1st age was original D&D, 2nd age AD&D 1st, 3rd age AD&D 2nd, 4 age D&D 3-3.5, 5th age 3.5+.

The second age games ran from 1989 to 2000 with two different groups 2x a month each. 2000-2008 two different groups also.


That is about how mine goes. I have not "changed ages" with editions. Edition changes have been transparent for the most part. The biggest rule change was the adoption of most of the d20 conventions. It still did not change the character of the game. Mechanics are not the character.

I have one player that has been with me the entire 33 year run. Funny thing, but she is not the one I married.

Drivvic the Southlander
08-04-2009, 04:13 PM
My longest campaign ran for a mere 16 months while I played in one for 4 years (but PCs kept coming and going and it wasn't very fluid) back in my High school years

Wulvaine
08-06-2009, 04:01 AM
So far? The longest I've played in was 2 sessions. :P

But that's about to change since I'm soon going to be playing in two separate D&D campaigns as well as DMing a heavily modified D&D campaign and probably a couple other things. I kinda fell out of the hobby for a couple years due to being discouraged about not being able to find anyone to play with until recently, but now I'm back in full force.

LordChicken
08-07-2009, 09:42 PM
D&D 3.5, I DMed for 2 years befor club ended, graduation ya know?

DragonPrince
08-26-2009, 04:40 PM
I DMed a campaign for over 5yrs every Friday night and sometimes included Saturday. Had the same group of PC's for most of it. There were a few that came and went but it was a good game.