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Farcaster
12-06-2006, 09:19 AM
What is the highest level character you have played and leveled up yourself from level 1 on? Tell us about him or her. Did you enjoy that level of play or wish you could have made your character even more powerful? How long did it take you?

This could be from any edition between 1st and 3.5.

Skunkape
12-06-2006, 10:46 AM
Had a 2nd edition paladin that I started at 1st and stopped around 17th level or so. Was lots of fun and is one of the more memorable characters from the group of guys I played with at the time.

Years later, they're still talking about that character, though I don't game with them so much any more.

He was your typical 2nd edition pally, with +5 plate, +5 shield and of course a +5 holy avenger! White charger warhorse, blond hair, blue eyes, high strength 18/00, high dex, con, wis & cha too, if I remember correctly, the lowest of those stats were around 15, int was around 12.

Was a real pain in the butt as far as the rest of the group was concerned as they were mostly chaotic sorts, but of all of the characters from that campaign, he's the one everyone remember and talks about!:D

CAD
12-06-2006, 11:25 AM
First edition grey elf magic user with a 23 intelligence, and I forgot when I voted that while he had enough experience to be 22nd level (plus Glantrian Secret Craft levels) he was capped at 20th level, given his intelligence, race and straight class. I have long wanted to convert him to third, but finding an epic game is another matter entirely.

Saed was a blast to play, a little ecentric for a racist (hated humans and dwarves) and of course he couldn't smell his own brand!

Then again there is my first character Sarc, a half-orc fighter 13th/thief 16th (thanks to his gauntlet that allowed him to exceed his fighter limitations). Thanks to another DM that allowed me to play M'larky, a halfling (1st edition bard) Ranger 7th/Thief (Acrobat) 8th/Bard 12th. All of these levels wouldn't have been possible without Unearthed Arcana and a few judicious house rules/items though, which is the most pleasing aspect of third edition.

Ed Zachary
12-09-2006, 12:23 PM
I've been playing D&D on and off since 1980, and have four established characters that have been in and out of a few games, often they have lost considerable amounts of experience in the change process. All four were started in the early 80s, two have gone through racial changes when new but similar races were added. There has also been some allignment drift.

Fighter (N) L-16: started out half elf, changed to gith when 2.0 rules came out.

Magic User (CG) L-21: gray elf... drifted to half CN as his efforts to rid the world of evil had been tainted with occasional greed and lust for power.

Assassin/Magic User (CE) L-16/16 (ver 2.0), now L-12/11 Sor/Rog (ver 3.5): started out an elf, changed to drow early on after the Giants modules came out. Tended toward borderline N as he became a successful merchant in underdark and surface.

Priest (LE, Kali) L-16: human, drifted from CE to LE as he evolved into a paranoid control freak, now a mummy.

Farcaster
12-11-2006, 09:03 AM
Fighter (N) L-16: started out half elf, changed to gith when 2.0 rules came out.

Magic User (CG) L-21: gray elf... drifted to half CN as his efforts to rid the world of evil had been tainted with occasional greed and lust for power.

Assassin/Magic User (CE) L-16/16 (ver 2.0), now L-12/11 Sor/Rog (ver 3.5): started out an elf, changed to drow early on after the Giants modules came out. Tended toward borderline N as he became a successful merchant in underdark and surface.

Priest (LE, Kali) L-16: human, drifted from CE to LE as he evolved into a paranoid control freak, now a mummy.

3 out of 4 of your characters actually changed from one race to another in the course of their adventures? :eek: I'm interested in hearing about the backstory behind that. :)

Skunkape
12-11-2006, 02:04 PM
I had a character that started out as a human, but through the story of the game the GM changed him into an elf. GM had or added a back story element where the character had pissed off his deity so badly that the deity cursed him and turned him into a human. Can't remember what level he finally made it to, but that was a fantastic character too! Though not as memorable as the paladin.

I would be interested in hearing about your character's too Ed.

Ed Zachary
12-11-2006, 03:09 PM
3 out of 4 of your characters actually changed from one race to another in the course of their adventures? :eek: I'm interested in hearing about the backstory behind that. :)

Two of them did, a third became cursed as an undead a mummy.

In the old D&D rules, there were very few character races to chose from. When the Fiend Folio first came out, we were given the option to change to a new race (as if it had always been like that), if it fit the character's life history better. I was running a CE elf Assassin/Magic User, and the subrace of Drow fit him much more than standard surface elf. It was not considered a racial change, but a clarification of subtype of elf.

When the second edition came out, my human fighter chose to become a gith. Again, a gith is a subtype of human. He could have been a gith all along. So as above, it was not really a change, but a clarification of subtype.

I hope that helps, I'm not a fan of making changes in who a character is.

Ed Zachary
12-11-2006, 03:20 PM
I had a character that started out as a human, but through the story of the game the GM changed him into an elf. GM had or added a back story element where the character had pissed off his deity so badly that the deity cursed him and turned him into a human. Can't remember what level he finally made it to, but that was a fantastic character too! Though not as memorable as the paladin.

I would be interested in hearing about your character's too Ed.

There are two type of changes that can occur... in game as a result of an action by a PC or NPC, or out of game as a result of an action by the DM.

It sounds like your change was in game... the result of a pissed off diety. While he may have had a human body, his mind was still that of an elf!

The two characters in question were from the very early 80s, when the only options were human, elf, half elf, dwarf, gnome, hobbit or half orc.

Me CE elf was recatagorized as a drow, which had not been previously available as an elf subtype.

My loner fighter was recatagorized as a gith, which had not been previously available as an human subtype.

These modifications happened out of game, and did not change who the character was (they were still the same race). In fact they helped greatly with character personality development. I would never change a dwarf to a human, but a friend did change one to a duergar (dwarven subtype).

Farcaster
12-11-2006, 04:45 PM
I am exclusively DM. It is a very, very rare occasion that I actually have an opportunity to play. The last long-running campaign I was in spanned about two years between 1998 and 2000. It was set in a custom world of the DM's design using 2nd edition rules with some rules borrowed from the Birthright setting.

My character was a human cleric named Ylin Firetree, who was notably the first in a long line of characters so named. Dedicated to the god of Justice, Ylin was a paladin in every way except THAC0 and abilities. (Okay, how many of you just shuddered when I said, THAC0?) Even though he wasn't quite a knight, he behaved very much like one.

What was most interesting about playing Ylin was the progression of his outlook as it developed over his many adventuring years. At the start, I played him every bit the archetypical hard-nosed Lawful Good type. The DM gave me a wide degree of latitude in detailing the dogma and tenets of the church, so the religion itself was deeply based on Ylin's beginning attitudes.

Over time though, Ylin came to realize that the path to righteousness was not always the clearest path. In fact, he wrote a book about his observations called, "The Nature of Good and Evil," which ended up being quite controversial in his church and started the beginnings of a great schism amongst the followers--some of whom followed the old ways and some who found enlightenment in Ylin's observations and looked to the church to progress out of it's "dark ages," if you will.

Later on in his career, Ylin and his companions were actually thrown back one thousand years to the moment of the world's worst cataclysm. The cataclysm had actually been caused by the death of a god, slain by a mortal woman in an epic battle. The deity's death was enough to create an explosion sufficient to destroy much of the southern continent. Miraculously, the woman survived somehow, and was found comatose on the coast of what remained of the southern continent. The woman would never regain consciousness, but she lived long enough to give birth to twins, who ended up being the fragmented aspects of the slain god, one being Justice, and the other War.

Ylin and his companions survived the blast and were able to find the woman and protect her until she gave birth both to Ylin's god (of Justice) and to the god of war. So it was that Ylin ended up being the First Priest of his god, Theorin. At the direction of the infant god, Ylin wrote the first prayer book, an artifact that was kept by the church even a thousand years later. Unable to resist the temptation of proven the naysayers of his philosophies wrong, Ylin also wrote another book using the same ink and paper detailing the beginnings of the church and his role in it. He then hid the book in a place that he could then rediscover it when he returned to the future.

And let me tell you, when he finally did return to the future and uncovered his own ancient writing, he threw the church into a upheaval like one it had never seen before. The High Pope himself had a few choice words for him. But, it was the beginning of a change that Ylin had been working towards for years.

Unfortunately, two years into the game, our DM ended up moving to Chicago, so the tale, sadly, is left unfinished, but I can say that it was the most incredible gaming experience I have ever had, and the richest and most vibrant character I have ever played. By the end of his career, Ylin was around 13th level and on the precipice of events that would have likely resulted in the creation of a New Church of Theorin with him as High Priest, and probably a holy war.

God, I miss that character!

Ed Zachary
12-12-2006, 01:35 PM
What was most interesting about playing Ylin was the progression of his outlook as it developed over his many adventuring years. At the start, I played him every bit the archetypical hard-nosed Lawful Good type. The DM gave me a wide degree of latitude in detailing the dogma and tenets of the church, so the religion itself was deeply based on Ylin's beginning attitudes.

Excellent... the best games are those where the DM gives the players the freedom and creative liscence to shape the campaign. If the game is about the players, then they will add so much more.

To me the worst DMs are the contol freaks, who want the players to be bit characters in their own personal fantasy.

Shadowfire757
12-17-2006, 05:25 PM
If I am reading the poll right than the highest I have ever leveled a character up to is 5th level although the DM let me start at 3rd since the edition was Advanced Second and in his opinion Wizards less than level 3 were useless as adventurers. I got to level up twice before the game fell apart and the DM got annoyed with intergroup arguments. Since then I have never really levelled up anybody because I am the DM or the game falls apart after only a few sessions, with nothing significant to warrant levelling up.

ronpyatt
12-20-2006, 10:31 AM
A multi-class Egoist/Psychic Warrior/Soulknife at 28 lvl that turned evil for a short while. I began with that character at 1st level, and he quickly gained levels 4 or 5 at a time. Leveling up was such a pain, but in the end he was powerful enough to help take out a many unbeatable monsters on different planes. Funny, it was the Paladin in our party that kept us in trouble.

Farcaster
12-21-2006, 12:58 PM
So, no 31st and beyonds?

Ed Zachary
12-28-2006, 10:05 AM
So, no 31st and beyonds?

Once you get into the 20s, there is very little adventuring that can be done that will offer you a challenge. Characters of that level become the puppetmasters, directing the peons.

I think that the best levels for adventuring are between 7th and 16th.

Farcaster
01-04-2007, 10:39 AM
Oh, I don't know. I think there are plenty of opportunities for adventure in the post 20 game, particularly in the planes. My current group is around 13th level, and to be honest, I can't wait to get them into the epic game. In our last campaign, their characters were well into the high 20s, and I had no lack of story lines to keep them occupied. The roleplaying aspect definitely becomes a more critical component of the game that this point, because there are just so many hecatoncheires and undead-baby-god atropals out there to slay.

Ed Zachary
01-08-2007, 12:36 PM
Oh, I don't know. I think there are plenty of opportunities for adventure in the post 20 game, particularly in the planes. My current group is around 13th level, and to be honest, I can't wait to get them into the epic game. In our last campaign, their characters were well into the high 20s, and I had no lack of story lines to keep them occupied. The roleplaying aspect definitely becomes a more critical component of the game that this point, because there are just so many hecatoncheires and undead-baby-god atropals out there to slay.

Unlike 20+ level fighters and the other lesser classes, my 21st level Wizard does not walk around. He rides in a Flying Carpet with a Perminent Mord's Mansion cast into it, has Perminency on a number of defensive spells, and is hidden by Sequester. He uses Foresight and Shapechange as two of his five 9th level spells. When battle starts, he uses overwhelming firepower quickly. If it's not over by the time he's out of spells and charged items, he disappears into extra-dimensional space.

The character was started in 1980, and given the fact that he's lost many levels when entering new campaigns, he'd be much higher. I'm going to play him to first survive, second win, third flee or attack later. To go toe to toe with a monster wielding just my staff would be stupid... er... what a fighter would do. I also keep summoned creatures nearby who will give up their existance for my survival. How else would anyone realistically play a high level Wizard?

And with that strategy, out of our group of eight high level characters, only myself and the other Elven Wizard survived. Why... because we had the ability to run away better after defeat was iminent. We killed a Dragon God, but were attacked by its minions while looting its treasure. It took me a year to escape a plane with hundreds of elder dragons (with True Seeing) hunting for me and guarding the only gate out. I believe that the other Wizard is still trapped.

That being said, my higher level Rogue/Sorcerer, Priest and Fighter would become involved in the melee. The fighter would rush in, but the other two would provide support from just out of range, but could help with the fighting if pressed. But we never came up against a hecatoncheire.

GristleDemon
01-18-2007, 01:44 AM
Hello. I hit the 50 plus because I was unsure of how else to express Godhood. Anyone remember the old divine rules for D&D? I have had few reach that but if it was best it would be my 23rd lv elven fighter. He never got all that far on the path to ultimate power but was the most fun (and powerful for his level) that i have ever run. He lived through a number of homebrewed and the whole dragonlance sega (LG I had Sturm's place) before moving into a new world and new setting, Spelljammer. His exploits with the elven navy are too many to list but he left tens of millions on gp in huge diamonds (Voadoni module Under The Dark Fist i think, plus some crazy loot) on the Rock of Brall (I forget the spelling). His death came after saving the elven homeworld in the Tree of Life, then got crushed like a gnat in a homebrewed war. I loved every moment of his life. I am happy to share with you all and hope you all have character like Revlis.

Farcaster
01-19-2007, 09:59 AM
That sounds like an awesome saga, Gristle!

Ed Zachary
01-19-2007, 08:36 PM
I hit the 50 plus because I was unsure of how else to express Godhood.

I have had few reach that but if it was best it would be my 23rd lv elven fighter. He never got all that far on the path to ultimate power but was the most fun (and powerful for his level) that i have ever run.

Hmmm... it seems like the 50th level was something that was routinely reached by player characters. How many weeks of playing did that usually take?

Sorry for the sarcastic tone, but I had met some players from a game like that in the past. They reached god-hood in less than a year of play, but there was no role playing, and the players were incapable of effectively playing single digit level characters.

bigtony
01-22-2007, 01:55 PM
Once you get into the 20s, there is very little adventuring that can be done that will offer you a challenge. Characters of that level become the puppetmasters, directing the peons.

I think that the best levels for adventuring are between 7th and 16th.
you have to be kidding!!!!! some of the greatest adventeruring can be done at high levels - thats when kings adventure with kings and dragons and you have kingdoms to worry about and wars to worry about and alies to make and planes of existance's to cross and gods to make happy and even go to your gods plane and join him as his right hand - by going to the world and spread the word

Zijaerdran
01-22-2007, 06:40 PM
My highest character so far is a Human Cleric/Hunter of the Dead (3.0ed) who reached 19th level before my group disbanded due to scheduling problems. This was also my first 3.0ed character and I often used him as a plot device when it was my turn to DM (which was most of the time). Now, I'm guessing that some of you are thinking, "I bet that character had some sweet gear and his share of advantageous house rules". In reality, he was probably the least powerful character in our group. I liked using him as a way to add some suspense in the game. I made sure that he was nothing really special so as to create that element by making the him more vulnerable to being lost or incapacitated (or even killed). Thereby, potentially robbing the party of ready healing in the middle of a campaign. Though not an unheard of, or an extremely clever strategy, it worked quite well.

...and thus ends my stream of babble.

Cheers,
Z

GristleDemon
01-27-2007, 12:24 AM
Hmmm... it seems like the 50th level was something that was routinely reached by player characters. How many weeks of playing did that usually take?

Sorry for the sarcastic tone, but I had met some players from a game like that in the past. They reached god-hood in less than a year of play, but there was no role playing, and the players were incapable of effectively playing single digit level characters.


Hello, if I may I have to say i see no need for the sarcastictic tone. I am no super gamer but I have played for 19 of my 24 year. I have had some stupid characters that were overpowered but i would not include them here, they were boring and unmentionable. Revlis was run for about 7 years, I did not want to bore anyone with years of gamer rants so I will leave it at that. I mean no ill will but feel you did.

Ed Zachary
01-27-2007, 05:00 PM
Hello, if I may I have to say i see no need for the sarcastictic tone. I am no super gamer but I have played for 19 of my 24 year. I have had some stupid characters that were overpowered but i would not include them here, they were boring and unmentionable. Revlis was run for about 7 years, I did not want to bore anyone with years of gamer rants so I will leave it at that. I mean no ill will but feel you did.

OK... so you started playing D&D when you were 5 years old. From my past experiences (non-gaming observations), few high school players (up to age 17) were capable of playing well conceived characters. If you did start this character post-high school, then it is feasible that over six years you could raise a character to 50th level. But that would take alot of playing one character exclusively, consistently, and with few setbacks (death, game changes). You had also mentioned that you had multiple characters that high.

No I mean no disrespect to you, and I apologize that you took it that way. But I have some questions regarding such a game where it was routine to raise characters that high. Did you start at first level? How many game sessions per level increase? How frequently did you play?

If you look upthread, some people questioned me about some of my characters. I was pleased that they took an interest, and answered their questions.

Thank you.

GristleDemon
01-28-2007, 11:57 AM
I think this may be my last post. frankly I'm sick of this. I do not feel the need to challenge your imput here. I would rather not post them be questioned. Since you have been gaming for long you must know of the old Immortal rules right? Not the hardest thing to do really, when you are a nerd and play day in day out. Why must you take it as something munchkin? I have played under some sick pk DMs, fighting vamps in Ravenloft at 1st. We died over and over but you learn. So say what you will, I mean it say anything, cus I'm just not interested.

p.s. Next time I answer a poll I wil just lie to please you, if there is a next time that is.

Ed Zachary
01-29-2007, 10:01 AM
Since you have been gaming for long you must know of the old Immortal rules right? Not the hardest thing to do really, when you are a nerd and play day in day out.

No, never heard of the Immortal Rules.

And don't take everything personal attack... I asked you some legit questions.

Gethsemane
01-30-2007, 04:36 PM
Some legitimate questions, Ed, but from who's point of view are they legitmate? It's all relative... all of it. That's why the never-ending litany is in frequent use: we all have different play styles, some are uber-RPers, some love.. and so forth. We all know the list, we've all seen it spewed out over and over. It's there because people see things in different ways, and when talking about something as subjective as our hobby, one isn't right and another wrong when all things are considered. For example, you have 'legitimate' concerns about Gristledemon's play style; from your standpoint it's questionable: meaning, as the dictionary will put it, that you found it necessary to question him about it. I'm willing to bet that from his perspective, some element of how you play is deserving of a good query as to it's worth and/or merit. You both have different ways you like to play, neither of which is better than the other. Add a third, fourth, or fifth person and you get three, four, or five more equally arbitrary opinions on play style. People have a hard time remembering it, so I'll repeat it. It's moot.

What I don't understand, everybody, is why we all feel like we have to ask someone to justify their play style. Your favorite playing style is ok. Seriously. If you enjoy 50th level characters, or playing Toon, or LARPing, it's not really my place to judge you as a person for that, nor is it anyone elses. I put together a get-together for gamers recently to facilitate the creation of a some gaming groups, and it played out like an Alcohol Annonymous meeting. Someone would 'admit' to playing Cyberpunk, or 'admit' that they've been playing for ten years, as if it's something to be ashamed of. Criminy, it was like pulling teeth! Even among peers and fellow gamers, we act like there's something wrong with what we do. Do you really believe that? I don't.

So, can we spend more time telling each other that we're all ok in our own way, and less trying to tell others that they aren't playing the 'right' way? Can I make that kind of request without being sniped as I see sniping going on in this thread? Let's all just put down our +5 shields of holier-than-thou defense, and our +3 avenging swords of judgement and remember that there's a thinking, feeling person behind the stats and the phat loot and the computer screen on these boards, someone who Might Not Like the things that I Like. And that's ok.


Hey, look at that- my first <end rant>

Farcaster
01-30-2007, 05:13 PM
I put together a get-together for gamers recently to facilitate the creation of a some gaming groups, and it played out like an Alcohol Annonymous meeting. Someone would 'admit' to playing Cyberpunk, or 'admit' that they've been playing for ten years, as if it's something to be ashamed of.

Hi... My name is Robert and I'm a game'o'holic. :D

I tend to agree with Gethsemane on this topic. Everyone has different playing styles, and that's okay by me. I don't believe that there is one way that is better or more noble to play than another. Some like hack-n-slash and mindless dungeon delving, because that's what they consider fun, and others go to the other extreme of being completely wrapped up in their character's own psychodramas and the intricate dynamics of the world their character lives in. I fall somewhere in the middle of those two extremes, as I enjoy the strategic element of the game, but it must have a purpose and an overall driving story line.

The only way that anyone else's gaming style at all effects me is if they happen to be in my group. There are definitely playing styles that I could not mesh well with -- power gaming comes to mind. But, that's just a difference in personal tastes, it is not a statement on the validity of their way of playing.

So, live and let live, I say. Everyone is welcome here.

And, by the by, I think the saying goes, "Drama is on TNT," not "PnP" LOL! :p

Ed Zachary
01-30-2007, 08:01 PM
Some legitimate questions, Ed, but from who's point of view are they legitmate?

For example, you have 'legitimate' concerns about Gristledemon's play style...

OK, here's my reason for asking...

I have been playing for quite a few years myself. Info on that is available upthread. But despite those years of playing mostly four characters, none had gone much further than 20th level. Beside the fact we played games other than D&D, the principal reason for that is each character went through between three and six resets where they lost experience, stats and items.

And being that I had never made it to 25th level myself, I was curious as to how GristleDemon achieved 50th level with multiple characters. If he had done it by years of gaming and a consistent play within one game, I would've had some interesting questions for him about his experiences. It would've been of great interest to me.

TwoGunBob
01-31-2007, 11:24 AM
Back in the mists of time I ran a magic-user from the time I was eight until I was fourteen. The style of play then was interesting in retrospect. There was a charming innocence in the flat level of play with the characters being the epitomy of good and true heroes of the realm.
They were overblown hyped up characters that were larger than life. My magic-user was indeed 54th level and had his tower and army of skeletons and zombies by the end as his alignment changed in there somewhere and he became a true to life bitter bastard. Might have something to do with pre-teen angst getting transferred maybe?
Looking back, experience points were given out freely, the DM's were forgiving. It was catering to everyone's desire to not be a hero but to be THE HERO. There was nothing wrong with it as everyone had a great time with our bloated characters with +5 everythings. Eventually we got a little more mature and new players came in while old ones left and there was a restart. And another.... Another... Then Dragonlance... Then a restart.
The more mature gaming suffered from a total lack of attention span so I never really had a character go higher than around 8th level since the days of my childhood.
Probably my favorite character ever was simply a 6th level Priest of Pholtus but he was also the last character I truly defined beyond the stats so that he 'breathed' if you will.
Some people get embarassed about the game style they had as kids. I look back on my magic user Pan Zel-Thorndike and see that he isn't legal in by the book AD&D but it was some of the best gaming for the lack of reason. From invading the Caves of Chaos and discovering the secret of Bone Hill and eventually solving the problem at the Barrier Peaks. It was great times but different times as well.

mensius
02-02-2007, 12:47 AM
The highest level character that I ever played was a pixie cleric/sorcerer/mystic theurge level 27. There is no proper way of expressing the joy this character brought me from the chaos he was capable of creating. I had originally wanted to him be just a sorcerer, but he had a great mind for pranks, and because of this he managed to garner the attention of god of chaotic neutral magic. Needless to say religion found him, and he was quickly ordained. This homebrew world pitted the lawful neutral god of magic against the lawful neutral god of magic. As such they were often the object of he affections. In fact, in time the title warmaster for this god was bestowed upon him. This title conferred upon him the ability to call upon all the faithful in a region and lead them in a "war". These wars were frighten to behold, because he could march 10's of thousands in a short amount of time toward a strong hold. Ultimately, the war ended at the base of the stronghold with thousands of chaotic magic users throwing a bbq. To pass the time between wars, he hung around a "reformed" incubus and the pair ran a sex toys shop. I use the term incubus loosely, because he forcused more on chaos than evil. So much so that the chaotic god of magic saw it fit to change his subtype to chaotic neutral. Despite being "reformed" many saw this incubus as a threat on reputation alone. Interestingly, the pair often sought to end the ensuing battles through humiliation rather than force. More than one opponent had suggestion and otto's irresistible dance used upon them in succession. Tales of nudity, sex toys, and self deprication on the battlefield abounded, and truth was often stranger than fiction. Had I not left for another state, I shudder to think of the depths of depravity he would have attained.

Farcaster
02-02-2007, 01:55 AM
Tales of nudity, sex toys, and self deprication on the battlefield abounded, and truth was often stranger than fiction. Had I not left for another state, I shudder to think of the depths of depravity he would have attained.

*shudder*

I can't remember any time that the word "sex toy" has come up in any roleplaying game I ever played. Although, there was a cybernetic device called the "Midnight Lady" in CyberPunk that I seem to recall...

TwoGunBob
02-02-2007, 07:19 AM
Well, there was that time I beat a smut dealer to death with a sex toy in a Vampire (1st edition) campaign but I was making a point. I couldn't tell you what that point was now. Little wonder I went back to AD&D...

Jakebow
02-02-2007, 07:49 AM
My highest Character i have played was a level 92 fighter. that character was also part of the longest game we and my freinds have ever played. story's about all the chacaters in that campaign are still talk about

Ed Zachary
02-02-2007, 10:01 AM
I'm glad to be getting the perspective of other players on high level (20+) characters. There is a great variety in player style, DM style and game setting. My only points of reference are the games I played in, and the players.

I didn't start playing until college, so most of the players were well educated and detail oriented. Many of us were history buffs, so the campaigns were set in a world similar to ours. We had between four and 12 players, and each of us had multiple characters (not played at the same time) throughout the setting. Four of us alternated in DMing, so we each had a part of the world to develop. For the epic campaigns, we had an assistant DM or two to make things flow along.

Our role playing wasn't limited to just adventuring or quests. Most characters interacted politically with their surrounding communities. That made the DMs job easier, the players helped out alot with world development. And the players had a stake in the world, so their characters became more developed and real. Characters were not created for one game, they were created for long term viability. Characters that were truly evil monsters became hunted pariahs, and the survivors later tended toward less extreme evil.

Anyway, once a character achieved high level status, they had accumulated a long list of rivals and enemies. A foolish player could see his character die in seconds if he was careless. Having an interesting character was alway number one, but there were five areas of importance for viable longlevity:
* Speed (to run away, or catch an opponent)
* Evasion (if your opponent can't find you, you're safe)
* Detection (you can't oppose what you don't know is there)
* Destruction (if you can't effect your opponents, why bother them)
* Resistance (even in the best laid out plans, you will be attacked at some point)

There would come a point in a character's existence where the list of powerful enemies became so great, that the player became paranoid. Any being that rapidly rose in power was bound to make plenty of enemies. My high level Wizard (low 20s) was so good in the five categories that he could take out any other player character or most world leaders. Unfortunately his extra-planar enemies were not so easy to take out, and they had reason to relentlessly hunt him. The reason I questioned others on their high level characters was because I wanted to know how their DMs challenged them. Did they sit in their lairs during their down time and only come out to hunt Hecatoncheries and the like, or did they interact with the rest of the world?

Farcaster
02-02-2007, 11:02 AM
My highest Character i have played was a level 92 fighter. that character was also part of the longest game we and my freinds have ever played. story's about all the chacaters in that campaign are still talk about

OMG! :eek: 92?! That is impressive. What kind of challenges would your characters face at that level? Any Undead Baby Gods in there?

Nok
02-04-2007, 12:15 PM
This may be a little of topic, but most DM's have always given my characters a foil. An Artemis to my Drizzt, so to speak. The bastard who, no matter what you did to kill him last time, would always show back up - this time with adamantite armor and a ring of regen around his pinky toe. Since I rarely would take a caster to higher levels, I just got bored after I can cast contingency, timestop, etc. I felt like everything I did was breaking the rules - I always had fighters that were not so much tanks, but obsessed with taking things down in one round with pure brawn. Led to some fun enemies for me and the DMs involved. 3.0 and 3.5 rules lend themselves to massive damage attacks for higher level fighters especially if tactical feats are allowed. truestriking a massive powerattack on a momentum swing (from that crazy tac feat that requires improved bull rush as a req) while holding a two handed giant weapon you had to enlarge yourself to pick up can really lead to some of the stupidest numbers a smasher-type character can deal in one lick. I digress - I'd like to hear about some of the rat bastards your favorite high level characters had to constantly deal with - even better if you didn't always win against them.

:mad:

Ed Zachary
02-04-2007, 10:26 PM
I digress - I'd like to hear about some of the rat bastards your favorite high level characters had to constantly deal with - even better if you didn't always win against them.

An Ancient Blue Dragon that could move at incredible speed, and had True Sight at an unlimited range. If it saw you and wanted to kill you, you were likely dead. Nobody could get close enough to it to cause it much damage. The only escapes were into the earth, teleport away, or hide in extra dimensional space for days and hope it wasn't waiting.

An 18/18 Githyanki Knight/Wizard (2.0 rules). We thought we had it killed inside a secure realm with no exits (gate proof). However we killed its clone and destroyed the realm, only to find that it had Magic Jarred one of the Wizard's familiar. The familiar saved one of its fingers, and had its body resurrected.

A Greater Dao Noble who flushed out every weasel character who lived underground, then turned our surface cities into sink holes. Its hard to survive when you fear setting foot on any surface.

Mephistopheles, who's army took over the capital city (Babylon), then coerced every temple, guild and militia to send its best to hunt us down or be destroyed. Old friends and allies could no longer be trusted.

ghost_runner
02-05-2007, 06:25 PM
I want to move to wherever farcaster is and be in some of his campaigns. Most of the ones I played in were of the module based hack N slash variety. Only problem is, I'm a much better follower than a leader. I can't deal with office politics, nevermind more involved far reaching politics. If you want an extremely clever bastard to come up with new traps, I'm your guy. Want insane ideas to break an enemy stronghold? Got it. Want to know how to keep the next door neighbors happy while still trading for mithril with thier most hated enemy.... er.... um.....ah....Sure.... get right on that.... (exit stage left)

RealmsDM
02-09-2007, 12:59 PM
my group & I used to run our PCs to level 20 then "retire them" so to speak. Since 3rd ed. & epic rules, we run til 30th level, then use the PCs here & there for "old times sake"

I currently have 2 3rd edition PCs under my belt and have just started my latest- a dwarven fighter.;)

Azmydar
02-15-2007, 08:55 PM
I started playing when i was 13 and in the Semiary. Take abunch of 13 to 16 year olds with no parents and way to much time by oursevles on the weekends. I worked a Barbarian style Human fighter from levle 1 to becoming more of a Knight style character with a kingdom by the end of his run. In the end He was titled High King Luke Spinlan. level 32 first edition fighter. My big schtick was the fact that i had 4 magical dancing Two handed swords, that I used all at once so I had basically alwyas one of them in my hands each round, then set it loose to restart the next one. I could hold an entire portion of the battlefield on my own, then add the fact that I was imune to fire, and my sidekick was a fireball chucking mage, you can imagine the insanity, and the carnage. AH goodtimes.
Azmydar The Amazing

Dino
02-19-2007, 09:39 AM
My friend and I had 50th level characters, one a piece. We played these characters for 2 1/2 years, almost everyday. After school and every weekend, we played non-stop, two players and one GM, we were a self made group and we were addicted. We played the 3.0 edition since that was the latest to come out and easiest for kids like we were to understand.

My character was an Elven fighter and my friend played a Human Mage (homebrewed class by our GM) We started these characters at 10th level and played them to about 25th level before introducing them to god-hood. They went through NUMEROUS adventures and crossed over planes of exsistance with help from higher more powerful beings. We started in Greyhawk, and traveled to Dragon Lance, Ravenloft, ancient egypt, and ancient Europe.

If you have a high level character like so and you find yourself with nothing challenging, that is simply bad GMing, my GM never had problems with finding stuff for us to kill, especially in the Epic Handbook, and once we surpassed that stuff he made his own monsters that would serve as a challenge. Those characters were finally run off by two alien type beings that destroyed the Greyhawk plane and nearly ended my fighter and my friend's mage. So fled the monsters and kind of faded into exsistance.

Moritz
03-01-2007, 04:35 PM
Running my 3.5 game, it took about 2 years real time for the players to reach level 20; and by the time the game was closing, someone had reached level 24. The lower levels are far better in my opinion.

Ed Zachary
03-02-2007, 02:18 PM
Running my 3.5 game, it took about 2 years real time for the players to reach level 20; and by the time the game was closing, someone had reached level 24. The lower levels are far better in my opinion.

I agree. One of my most memorable campaigns was where we all brought up multiple characters in a setting, and we mixed and matched which of our characters were going on the latest adventure. It's difficult to go back and forth between high level and low level characters. By using multiple characters, progression was deliberately slow, and we never go bored of the same characters. Most all were between 16th and 20th levels.

Eventually the DM got bored and reset the world, that's when we went to an alternating DM campaign. We reintroduced all our existing characters, but at 7th level, naked (no items or spell books), no abilities above 20, and there was a limit to the total ability score. It was worth it, because we all had alot invested in the concepts of our favorite characters.

Moritz
03-02-2007, 03:34 PM
Eventually the DM got bored and reset the world, that's when we went to an alternating DM campaign. We reintroduced all our existing characters, but at 7th level, naked (no items or spell books), no abilities above 20, and there was a limit to the total ability score. It was worth it, because we all had alot invested in the concepts of our favorite characters.

Oh man, I'll bet that was fun (no sarcasm here) starting at 7th level naked. I would totally dig on a game like that where you were skilled enough to keep yourself alive, but the major goal of the characters would be to get stuff.

In my long running D&D game the players descended into the underdark around 8-10th level (after multiple times of me warning against it) and were attacked by a number of slaver mind flayers. The entire party (sans the rogue who snuck away in time) lost ALL of their equipment, and much of the next few levels was trying to get it back.
They would find stuff along the way at merchant shops or traveling merchants that belonged to them and they had to buy it back, or barter for it.
I'd say though, they reclaimed less than 35% of their original stuff. But it made for a great series of adventures.

krakistophales
03-06-2007, 11:25 PM
Question...what exactly are the old divine rules that were talked about a few pages upthread?

Second,question for all those with fighter/non magic using classes:If and when you played a really high level fighter,did you ever play any kind of cross-planar game?Did you ever cross dimensions/go back in time/travel through levels of hell/etc. and if so did you simply do it with wizards/sorcerers in the group,or did the DM have to guide you with NPC spirits/gods/helpers/etc.?

Ed Zachary
03-07-2007, 06:12 AM
... for all those with fighter/non magic using classes: If and when you played a really high level fighter, did you ever play any kind of cross-planar game? Did you ever cross dimensions/go back in time/travel through levels of hell/etc. And if so did you simply do it with wizards/sorcerers in the group,or did the DM have to guide you with NPC spirits/gods/helpers/etc.?

Usually characters would start visiting the Ethereal and Astral Planes at about 7th to 9th level, and at around 11th to 13th level start visiting the Elemental and Lower Planes. That wasn't a hard and fast rule, just a general observation.

Every party I had been in had a mix of Fighters (Paladins, etc), and Spell Casters (Priests, Mages, etc), but not so much Thieves. Good tank-style fighters were very important because if the old Magic Resistance rules, and energy attack resistances and immunities.

I had never played any cross-over games, or done any time travel. The Hells were always a popular destination, one of the players in my group maintained a small fortress on the icy 8th Level.

Moritz
03-07-2007, 09:14 AM
Let's put this into perspective:

Level 50 is 1,225,000 experience points. This isn't a video game, this is sitting at a table and rolling dice and doing math, eating pizza, having the DM shuffle through papers and books to find challenges or treasure tables or what ever paperwork is associated, some actual RolePlay, going to the bathroom, kibbitizing, listening to your mom ***** about how loud you're being in the basement, and all the other crap that goes along with tabletop D&D.

Let's imagine the hours put into this...

In my game (as noted above - of which I was rather generous in my XP giving), we got the characters up to around level 20-25(maybe) so we'll average it to level 22 for math purposes, and that took two years of playing almost every weekend for perhaps 8 hours. That's around 416 hours of play = 34 days.

So, level 22 = 231,000xp gained in 416 hours. That equals to 555xp an hour.

Therefore, Level 50 = 1,225,000xp / 555xp per hour = 2207 hours = 91days

Level 96 = 4,560,000xp / xp per hour = 8216 hours = 342 days.

Seriously, we're not talking just Monte Hall DMing, we're talking Monte Hall to the factor of 20 who says, "Here ya go guys, kill this rat, get 10,000xp and gain half the magic items in the book. Then kill this goblin and get another 20K xp and the other half of items in the book."

The words "Power Gamer(s)" comes to mind.

Or, we're talking about people who sit around playing D&D and do nothing else in their mom's basement. Not even showering. Now that paints a pretty picture.

Ed Zachary
03-07-2007, 10:08 AM
Let's put this into perspective:

Level 50 is 1,225,000 experience points.

That's assuming the "power gamer" is LA=0. They're probably playing a Half Fiend Mind Flayer with the Vampire and Were Dragon templates thrown in. That would be somewhere around LA=20+.


In my game (as noted above - of which I was rather generous in my XP giving), we got the characters up to around level 20-25(maybe) so we'll average it to level 22 for math purposes, and that took two years of playing almost every weekend for perhaps 8 hours. That's around 416 hours of play = 34 days.

From what I've seen, characters go up a level approximately every three gaming sessions.


Seriously, we're not talking just Monte Hall DMing, we're talking Monte Hall to the factor of 20 who says, "Here ya go guys, kill this rat, get 10,000xp and gain half the magic items in the book. Then kill this goblin and get another 20K xp and the other half of items in the book."

Or, we're talking about people who sit around playing D&D and do nothing else in their mom's basement. Not even showering. Now that paints a pretty picture.

LMAO... did you catch the South Park episode where their game characters hung out in the woods and killed a gadjillion wild boars until they were like 50th level?

Moritz
03-07-2007, 10:26 AM
That's assuming the "power gamer" is LA=0. They're probably playing a Half Fiend Mind Flayer with the Vampire and Were Dragon templates thrown in. That would be somewhere around LA=20+.

From what I've seen, characters go up a level approximately every three gaming sessions.

LMAO... did you catch the South Park episode where their game characters hung out in the woods and killed a gadjillion wild boars until they were like 50th level?

LA - Oh yeah, ECL's... that would seriously jack up the XP gain. If calculated correctly, it could take longer to gain levels. Otherwise, you're a god of power smashing every enemy and gaining full xp. There was a time when the Savage Species book came out where some of my players wanted to create other racial packages. That is until they saw that an ECL 4 would get them a level every 4 or so levels that the rest of the players were gaining.

Every three gaming sessions - The way it worked for us, the players gained a level each game from levels 1-4. Then from levels 5-8 it was almost every other game to every 3rd game. Then from level 8-14 it was like every third gaming session, maybe 4th. Then after that, it was perhaps every 5th to 7th gaming session and up.
This was taking into account a party of 5-10 people. We always had huge games back in the day.
Yes, I was being generous. It should have been divided more.

Southpark - Love it. Cartman is such a fat ass.

Digital Arcanist
04-23-2007, 09:28 PM
My highest character is my current character, a level 19 red dragon from the template published in Dragon 332. I am having a blast playing him as well.

My second highest is a level 17 Drow Duskblade female who worships Eilistraee and pays homage to Corellon. I have her decked out in +5 Greater Shadowed Studded Leather and she wields a +3 screaming, shocking longsword and a +5 burning annulat. She didn't start out this way but has slowly evolved into a Xena-like character.

You were talking about running out of quality adventures Ed? The first campaign I DM'ed to epic levels, I had my party ascend to godhood and wage war on jealous gods for territory and worshippers. Being only rank 5 dieties, they felt like low-level players again and of course as Farcaster pointed out, the planes offer a lot of cool locales and ideas for epic level adventures.

In my current campaign, I have my players slated to cross-over into an alternate material plane that is about fifty years more advanced than we are now. I think its going to be great to see the players try to reconcile their fantasy characters with a modern d20 setting. Their goal is to find a piece of tech that they must take back and use to destroy the evil deity from the modern setting who was banished to the fantasy setting. This evil deity was broken free and is wrecking the fantasy setting but angels from the modern setting were sent over to prepare a group of adventurers to fight the evil monster and save both worlds.

Somehow elven archers wielding sniper rifles interests me.

Ed Zachary
04-24-2007, 02:52 PM
You were talking about running out of quality adventures Ed? The first campaign I DM'ed to epic levels, I had my party ascend to godhood and wage war on jealous gods for territory and worshippers. Being only rank 5 dieties, they felt like low-level players again and of course as Farcaster pointed out, the planes offer a lot of cool locales and ideas for epic level adventures.

Not at all. As a DM I try to follow the interests of the players. I had been starting them out at 7th level (earlier editions), and will be starting them out with 21,000 exp points in my 3.5 edition game. I want the players to have some power and limited influence over the world around them. In that was they will work with existing and new power structures, and endless adventure ideas will follow from that.

As a player I avoid games with authoritarian DMs who want to keep player characters weak, and strongly guide what they can and can't do. Like the game I left in the Albany area.

As a player and DM, I noted that once characters hit 20th level that they accumulated a long list of enemies, and role playing was lost to survival. Epic characters became nothing more than killing machines that could be very vulnerable to other killing machines. In my opinion Epic level characters should be semi retired, shill under control of the player, and only participate in Epic adventures kept away from lower level player and non-player characters.

For me, role playing is all about the interaction between the players as it relates to the adventure at hand. As DM, I had to deal with the occasional "Invisible Flying Magic User" who lived in a hole deep underground. They added nothing to the game, and did more damage by constantly attacking other characters. I killed one off (a player who I wanted gone) with a random encounter with a Noble Dao, and I designed random encounters to warn two other players. The one player was poison to the group, and he put everyone else into the bunker mentality.

starfalconkd
04-25-2007, 01:08 PM
My highest character started in second edition as a first level Ranger. He made it to Ranger 12 then dual classed into Wizard and took that 18. We converted him to 3.5 and played a quest or two. In 3.5 he is 21st level by conversion rules. So he was Ranger 4/ Wizard 6/ Eldritch Knight 11. He probably gained a level from his last quest but we never did xp.

Digital Arcanist
04-25-2007, 01:27 PM
I can empathize with you Ed on the over-powered magic users. I played in a group where there was a mage who ensnared a lich and was able to shove off all the damage he took to the lich who could not be destroyed because his phylactery was in a pocket dimension that no one could access. I think the DM was crazy to even allow such a thing to happen.

At the higher levels, as a DM I become especially strict with respect to the rules. I make sure that my players can't start crafting overly powerful artifacts. I often find that people equate the appellation of epic with god-like when in fact it only equates to a renown level in the world and not a power level of the character.

I agree with you Ed, that at a certain point characters should be retired. I find that a lot of players want to start something new after 14 or 15 levels. With the plethora of classes in Dragon and the supplemental books, I know I get class-ADD all the time.

Ed Zachary
05-08-2007, 02:21 PM
My Gray Elf Wizard had made it to 28th level this past weekend. I'm trying to make it into the Chosen of Mystra, but they've given me three tasks. The first two were relatively easy, but the third will be nearly impossible. I need to destroy the Red Wizard Aznar Thrul of Thay. Here is what I am up against...

To get his attention I had been sinking ships in the harbors of Bezantur, Thasselen and Murbant, and Escalant too. I had a permanent Prismatic Sphere hidden by Sequester a mile underground in the middle of nowhere, but it was found and taken down by a team of Thayan bounty hunters (all epic level) led by Aznar Thrul himself. I do not know how they found it, but they used Mordenkainen’s Disjunction to destroy it. I was fortunate to Teleport out, and I blame them for the deaths of my assistant, 12 students and familiar Tomaret who were trapped inside. I started dropping Walls of Stone and Walls of Iron from high above on their Central Citadel and Temple of Shar in Bezantur, and the Red Wizards responded by covering much of the city with a Wall of Force. With Binding I captured Yecnol (Red Wizard) when he engaged me in battle, and Ormigredon (Priest of Shar) outside his temple. They could not protect the entire city, so I burned the warehouses and the markets. I learned who the remaining members of the Thayan group are (see below). They hired a group of Blue Dragons, Cornugons and Marids to help them. My best attack had been to cast Binding with the help of my six Simulacrums, then Teleport out. Aznar Thrul, Dragon Wyrm Talomir, Devil Prince Arygol, Marid Padish Emelichar and their major followers now have Spell Immunity to Binding, and are protected by Foresight. Although they were protected, I still was able to burn their cities and ships at will. Their tactics have evolved to using their Magic Circles to cast Mord’s Disjunction at a ridiculously high caster level to approximately where their Foresight warned them that my attack will come from, and enhanced it with Meta/Enlarge (range 250 ft) and Meta/Widen (80 ft radius). I still attack them with Arcane Energy, but need to retreat immediately after firing two bolts before they could cast their Disjunction.

starfalconkd
05-08-2007, 05:17 PM
Fake your death. Surround yourself with an anti-magic field to become immune to their foresight. Surround his location in the tower with dimension block spells and then crush the tower from up high after you disintegrate any wall of force defenses. Just an idea.

Ed Zachary
05-09-2007, 07:21 AM
Fake your death. Surround yourself with an anti-magic field to become immune to their foresight. Surround his location in the tower with dimension block spells and then crush the tower from up high after you disintegrate any wall of force defenses. Just an idea.

Much appreciated, that would be one way of avoiding the situation.

Unfortunately this Wizard does not like using Anti-Magic Field as it would cancel out his magic. And cowering into a tower or hole in the ground would be an admission that I had feared my opponents and surrendered. And then I would have to keep my presence hidden, 100% ending all role playing.

And there are ways of knowing that I wasn't dead... a Discern Location spell would locate my soul on whichever plane I went to.

Instead I will develop a tactic that can be equally effective, by bypass their advantage of using Foresight (I use that spell too). I will probably have to use Project Image, so their attacks will target my image rather than myself. I doesn't matter that they will know it is an image, Foresight only warns them from where the spell will be coming from.

Digital Arcanist
05-09-2007, 12:30 PM
There are feats, Tome of Magic or Complete Scoundrel I think, that give you the ability to have a spell's beginning location change from the caster to say a door on the street or some nic-nac.

Come to think of it, I think the feat is in Cityscape. It might be useful for your task to know this feat.

Kilrex
05-14-2007, 08:46 PM
Or, we're talking about people who sit around playing D&D and do nothing else in their mom's basement. Not even showering. Now that paints a pretty picture.

In high school we didn't play in any mom's basement. We had an older friend who was our DM, so we played at his house. We would start Friday about 6PM and game until about 8PM Sunday. No showers, only about 4-5 hours of sleep sometime Sat afternoon, as many 40 cent burgers as you wanted to eat, lots of Jolt, and the occasional quick game of Goldeneye on the N64, while the DM had a quick word with a player or a short interval while your char was not being involved. We had 8 players and one DM. This was our weekend and we loved it!

Long hours with bad grub and a bunch of stinky dudes following rules that had no real meaning. Nothing prepared me for the military better than those weekends long ago.

starfalconkd
05-15-2007, 09:14 AM
I would've enjoyed that when I was younger. :) Part of me misses that kind of fun, part of me doesn't.

Swiftblade
05-20-2007, 10:38 PM
Damn do I miss that style, 36 to 48 hrs of almost non-stop gaming.
In 2e my highest level character was 22nd, was a bladesinger and could dance through a battlefield untouched and slay most of the foes himself while laughing and singing.
In 3e and 3.5e, in my last group before I moved, myself and a friend were co-dming a game, so our NPC's were also characters, and together we brought the game to potent epic levels. We started everyone out as 1st level characters with 0 exp, but all had 1 important Level adjustment, all had a +4 because they were chosen of their dieties. Well, after we retired our characters they would make cameos and pop in for differing things, and then we reopened the session and brought them all into an epic campaign that brought them all to divinity. My sun-elf wizard 23/monk 8/archmage 5/elven high mage 5, who was also a chosen of Mystra and the Magister became a lesser diety. 41 levels and +8 on Mystra and Magister, oh forgot to add also became a Modanic(sp) Deva adds another +11 equals ECL 60 plus divinity put him over 80, and all of this took 4 years, and most of that experience came from role-play instead of roll-play. Where is the fun of looking for a fight just to gain exp, we sought a lot of exp by the things we did, money was never an issue for us, so we had to run a city we founded, train apprentices or squires and work on diplomatics with surrounding kingdoms. Was alot of fun, the divinity was the hardest thing to do as a player, was easy to do as a DM.

TheYeti1775
05-21-2007, 01:05 PM
Didn't reply on the poll as its kind of subjective to which ver your in.

In Box days it would be a Human Wizard who made it to the mythical 30's in level in the Immortal Box.
In 1E, most of my characters retired in the mid-teens with the exception of a notable few. But by early 20's they retired as well.
In 2E, same as 1E, but in the campaign we had removed the old level limits of demi-humans. So my high level ones tended to be half-elves. One of these days, I'll bring the one of the characters forward into 3E rules. But really unless I DM a group up into epic levels, it will remain a maybe one day for fun thing.

Now in 3.0/3.5, currently I have the following 'active':
Valus (D20 World - My campaign) - Magnus Human Wizard 19th. Currently is consider a DMPC, but he is part of the history of the world now. Characters in my campaign have heard of him but have not had any interaction.
Dawnforge (D20 World) - 2 characters here.
Lord Lorac Dargaard Human Fighter 10 Celistal Heritage 3
(Home-Brew PrC) I went with a charismatic fighter on this one.
Morigath Ulrich Human turned World's first Half-Elf Wizard 15

Most characters I've started at 2nd or 3rd level, as it allowed for more of a backstory in character profiles of how they got to the point of their lives adventuring.

LadyAtrayu
05-21-2007, 10:32 PM
My highest level character was Jessie, my human sorcerer, at level 22. Of course, she ended up "guiding by the spirit" a level 6 monk. Pretty much, we were epic characters role playing lower level characters. Things got weird, but it was an interesting experience.

Farcaster
05-23-2007, 02:20 PM
In 2E, same as 1E, but in the campaign we had removed the old level limits of demi-humans.

As a DM, I never used the demi human limits. I dabbled with using the demi human and multi-class xp penalties, but my players railed against it so much, I decided to ignore that as well. Honestly, I can't remember any DMs who used the demi-human level restrictions. The canon explaination for the restrictions didn't make much sense anyway.

QumullusTheNimblest
05-23-2007, 11:52 PM
I think this is mentioned elsewhere by another member in here, but i'm not sure which topic: buuuut,

May be more a result of my regular group's tastes & my DMing ability, but we seem to always get "tired" of any campaign and/or characters after about 12th. Seems once they get too loaded with abilities, available powers/spells, and gain massive equipment (altho THAT can be stripped away, of course) combats get bogged down and take forever and our "excitement" about it wanes. We inevitably shelve that group and start with new 1st levelers again. I have pro-s & con-s in mind, looking for any feedback you all may have:

Pro-s (re-starting): There's just something thrilling about rolling up those first stats for a new character, we can't deny that! Also, the thrill returns in 2 ways: combats can be quick & many, AND everyone is scared of everything again (mainly due to lack-o-HPs).

Con-s: We've invested literally years of story & time into these characters, story, world, etc - it's very comfortable to stay there, starting over means everything has to be re-written (DM p.o.v.). Also, I would LIKE to DM a high-level group, just to try it, but worry that the characters are too difficult to challenge anymore. Also, characters with such deep history, foe lists, roots in parts of the "world", and sometimes "loose ends" to tie up can lead to very interesting and worthwhile story arcs (I would think - as I said, haven't run much past 12th before...)

Anyway, sorry so long, but my 2 cents. Feel free to throw rocks... (ask me about THAT story some time.)

QumullusTheNimblest
05-23-2007, 11:55 PM
Oh, worth mentioning above is that, yes, alas (heavy sigh) my group is both large (5 players) AND primarily hack-n-slashers. I know, I know! But it's what they like, and it keeps them coming back weekly...
So, before you all throw BIG rocks at me & mine... be merciful. (throw low)

Moritz
05-24-2007, 08:00 AM
D&D is all about Hack and Slash, Killing Monsters, Getting Treasure. It rocks.

Farcaster
05-24-2007, 10:33 AM
Also, I would LIKE to DM a high-level group, just to try it, but worry that the characters are too difficult to challenge anymore.

My last campaign ran into the 28th level range. We didn't have as much problem with the character abilities, but by the time the character's made it through to that level they had massive baggage. There were probably a dozen or more mini-storylines that were dangling around the periphery of the game, unresolved and getting ever worse. The PCs had made a lot of enemies, amongst them a couple of evil gods who personally wanted to see them dead (Cyric and Auril, from Forgotten Realms, were the most notable of which.)

Unfortunately, the game became bogged down and the players eventually elected for a fresh start with new characters. But, I must say that I really enjoyed running the epic game. There were so many ideas that I still had to explore, I'm longing for my current game to progress into the epic levels--they are currently 16th level, so we're getting close.

Trust me, though, even at 28th level, I could always come up with something that would challenge my players. Things just had to be at a grander scale. More of their adventures starting taking place in exotic locations, such as the planes and in a realm they found in the hollow of the world which was truly epic scale. They also had interactions with a number of epic organizations that were certainly more than a match for their abilities, such as the Gleaners (from the Epic Level Handbook) who wanted several of the artifacts they had acquired over time.

The chief principle your PCs must be reminded of is that no matter how powerful they become, there is always someone out there more bad-ass than they are. ;)

Ed Zachary
05-26-2007, 03:04 AM
My Gray Elf Wizard had made it to 28th level this past weekend. I'm trying to make it into the Chosen of Mystra, but they've given me three tasks. The first two were relatively easy, but the third will be nearly impossible. I need to destroy the Red Wizard Aznar Thrul of Thay.


My last campaign ran into the 28th level range. We didn't have as much problem with the character abilities, but by the time the character's made it through to that level they had massive baggage. There were probably a dozen or more mini-storylines that were dangling around the periphery of the game, unresolved and getting ever worse. The PCs had made a lot of enemies, amongst them a couple of evil gods who personally wanted to see them dead (Cyric and Auril, from Forgotten Realms, were the most notable of which.)

The chief principle your PCs must be reminded of is that no matter how powerful they become, there is always someone out there more bad-ass than they are.

Aznar Thrul had been missing of late, but had just returned, badder than ever. He challenged me to a magical fight, one on one. Notice went out he will be waiting for me on top of his tower in his fortress in Priador at midnight, in a day and a half. If I fail to show up he threatened that Thay will invade Algarond. Rumor has it that Aznar Thrul has just acquired True Spellfire.

As a player, how can I turn down this type of challenge? I've been dying to kill off that NPC chump, and for my character to become a Chosen of Mystra. But all effing hell... an epic level Red Wizard with True Spellfire, on his home ground?

And in character, how could a High Harper run away from a public challenge made by a Red Wizard? If I fail to show up I will be labeled as a coward, and responsible for allowing a war to start that I could've prevented.

I know what True Spellfire does, and as a non-combat arcane spellcaster, that supposedly takes away what I do best and gives him an awesome counterattack against me. But I do have a plan to win the battle. Despite having no artifacts at my disposal and only standard Abilities/Items/Spells from the three Core Books plus Epic Handbook, I will beat him like a red-headed step child. My only request to the DM was that he act as referee, and have another player run Aznar Thrul for the battle.

starfalconkd
05-30-2007, 07:02 AM
Maybe you aren't supposed to kill him. Doing so would set off a civil war in Thay which would only end in Szass Tam rising to power.

Ed Zachary
05-30-2007, 07:28 AM
Maybe you aren't supposed to kill him. Doing so would set off a civil war in Thay which would only end in Szass Tam rising to power.

If they're going to start a war, better for them to start a civil war in their own nation than to invade mine.

And from what I understand, Szass Tam is already the lead Red Wizard.

I started this topic (http://boards1.wizards.com/showthread.php?t=854165) at the Realms message board. It seems that there will be a very relevant plot twist in the new novel "Unclean".

Farcaster
05-30-2007, 12:01 PM
The Red Wizards efforts as of late (at the time the Campaign Setting was released for 3rd edition, anyway) has been more mercantile in nature. Of course, this is undoubtedly a more subtle and sinister method of invasion.

Ed Zachary
05-30-2007, 01:11 PM
The Red Wizards efforts as of late (at the time the Campaign Setting was released for 3rd edition, anyway) has been more mercantile in nature. Of course, this is undoubtedly a more subtle and sinister method of invasion.

They could always call it "spreading freedom and democracy".

Digital Arcanist
06-01-2007, 12:29 PM
The last book I read involving the Thayans was book two of the Watercourse Trilogy. The Thayans are definitely in a merchantile state of mind. They are sending out mid-level red wizards to create enclaves where each enclave provides magical services. Some enclaves specialize in a particular service but most enter a town or city and set up shop, only to drive out the competition by any and all means. Through their services, the Thayans gain power and eventually will take over a city with no bloodshed.

It seems the only times the Thayans exercise their martial prowess are when they wish to move up the ranks in their schools or to fight the Witch Queen and her Aglarond forces.

starfalconkd
06-03-2007, 06:15 PM
They could always call it "spreading freedom and democracy".

Heh. Nice. :D

shilar
07-15-2007, 10:24 PM
I think my highest level character was a level 49 thief from 2nd edition. Just after 25th level the party decided to trying for divine ascension. My thief got nailed just after he personally acquired the last piece for the ceremony. The party put my body in the magic circle during the whole thing. The DM raised me as an avatar of the party's collective unconscious. Basically making me free willed, capable of manipulating party members subconsciously, and in charge of the dirty work for our little sub pantheon. Eventually a gained enough worshipers of my own to ascend out of the party's shadow.

We always had things to do. I think the only thing that let us keep leveling regularly as we got to higher level was that the DM counted victories by minions and worshipers as our own as long as it was our plan that pulled it off. We often had 5 or 6 of these splinter groups off on missions. He also counted victory by politics as well as force of arms. If we could talk our way past an enemy it was as good as a fight.

Farcaster
07-17-2007, 01:52 PM
49th in 2nd edition is quite a feat. The system you mentioned your GM using for experience sounds interesting and a fair work around to the whole exponential experience cost increases. Although, I seem to remember that leveled out at some point around 1.2 million XP per level. Can't remember now. In 2nd edition, as my players got higher level, I made judicious use of the bonus exp and story rewards to keep things going, and even then past 12th it was pretty damned rough.

Except for the rogue, I should say, because of the lower requirements per level for rogues -- and because using the bonus experience rules from the DMG, he got xp for ever 2 gold he stole... Which I might add encouraged a lot more backstabbing of fellow party members. Ah well. Just before we switched over to 3rd edition, he was easily 4 levels ahead of the rest of the group AND was working on dual classing.

shilar
07-17-2007, 08:34 PM
I was never much for stealing from the party. I stayed alive because I was useful to them. I was usually barely tolerated for my near villanous ways. It was in my best interest to keep my hands out of pockets that weren't mine unless it was for a very good reason. Murder and mayhem that was more my style.

Ed Zachary
07-17-2007, 09:34 PM
None of my evil characters ever stole from the party.

Taking a treasure before it became 'party property' was not stealing.

Farcaster
07-17-2007, 10:10 PM
Taking a treasure before it became 'party property' was not stealing.

For some reason, my group likes making the party rogue the group's accountant as well. It's weird, but true.

shilar
07-18-2007, 12:43 AM
For some reason, my group likes making the party rogue the group's accountant as well. It's weird, but true.
When 3rd edition came out I thought it was silly renaming thief to rouge. But once I saw the mental effect it had on the perception of these characters I couldn't argue it was a great idea. I had a thief that despite his insistance, under magical compulsion, that he would never steal property from its rightful owner. The party would not trust him. I was required an escort when ever we were in a town. Now most of my rouges would never even be questioned by the party. Even though they deserve it more than that guy did.

Moritz
07-18-2007, 09:48 AM
I wonder what level the Dungeons & Dragons cartoon characters got up to?

shilar
07-18-2007, 11:05 AM
I saw their stats one time I'll try and remember where. I think it was like 15th level or so.

Moritz
07-18-2007, 11:16 AM
For 15th level, they sure sucked. Presto especially.

starfalconkd
07-18-2007, 05:57 PM
If you purchased the DVD set, a book was included which had 3.5 stats of the kids (and their weapons) from just before a certain episode and stats for Venger. I got the set as a gift and I can look them up if anyone is really interested.

Moritz
07-19-2007, 08:11 AM
I'd be totally interested Starfalconkd. Just to see what they were thinking.

Argent
07-22-2007, 01:26 PM
The highest character ever, all Editions, was my 14th level paladin from 1st Edition. He married, retired, and settled down to run a small fiefdom on behalf of the king. I actually still use him as an NPC for my games today.

So far in 3.5 I haven't cracked 14th level, but have come close. I'm currently playing a monk in the Shackled City campaign path, and we are on track to become 20th at the end of it, if we survive/win.

But as long as I'm having fun, level doesn't matter so much.

Inquisitor Tremayne
07-23-2007, 07:46 AM
I've always joined existing games so I never got to start at 1st level with a D&D character.

Currently I have a Cleric of Pelor 8/Fighter 1 who started at 7th level and my previous character before that was a 13th level Fighter/Order of the Bow Initiate who started at 11th or 12th level. I love playing ranged characters because the largest battle map we have, she could hit anything that was on that map at no range penalty, even IF it had cover!

Good times!

Karui_Kage
07-23-2007, 04:32 PM
I've only really taken one character the distance, from 1-20, all done in 3.0

His name was Vedrimas Nailo. He began in Ravenloft, and was a Half-Vistani Rogue. He went up to level 10-12 in Ravenloft, I believe, before his death and subsequent 'transportation' to a different plane of existence. He awoke with only his short swords in another realm (and another game) and continued onwards. The game ended shortly after 20, I may have actually hit 21 with him, but I don't remember.

His final build was Half-Vistani Rogue 3/Ranger 7/Tempest 10. He dual-wielded two short swords (+1 adamantine Holy Undead Bane Flaming and +1 cold iron Axiomatic Outsider (Evil) Bane Ice), used a cloak of wings (is that what it was called? The cloak or cape that let the character have bird or bat wings) to fly around. Ended up having a ton of attacks if he got a full attack off, and was able to harass with Spring Attack too. Had the best stats of any character I rolled too. Only one average stat, one 18, two 17s, and two 16s, all witnessed. He was a little overpowered stat wise, but because of his choice in classes (all melee), it evened out against casters.