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Oldgamer
05-06-2009, 03:01 PM
Do you, as a DM, enforce Encumbrance? If so, do you include the weight of money such as coins and gems?

In 1st Ed AD&D, we never did. I saw on another thread on here someone posted about losing their primary weapon (A +5 sword) and went looking through several pages of equipment and found another, stating they had been collecting and carrying equipment for an entire career. We also did this, we never gave it thought that you would require several wagons and teams of horses to haul that stuff around :lol:

So in 3.x, I started cracking down on it for equipment, but I never gave much thought to money unless it got out of hand. They couldn't carry around 1000's of gold pieces (without the Handy Sacks of course), they'd either have to purchase gems or find a bank of some sort.

yukonhorror
05-06-2009, 03:06 PM
i have always been too lazy to enforce that, ammunition supply, and food/water supply. It is an accounting headache that slows down the game.

Unless it is something immediate, i.e. they come across the storage closet for all of the bad guys' arms and there are over 100 masterwork axes and the party wants to carry them all to sell them, it isn't worth it.

Farcaster
05-06-2009, 03:12 PM
I loosely enforce it, but I expect the players to have a rough idea of how much they are carrying and to police themselves on what they can carry. Still, I don't take it down to the nitty gritty of pounds per items and total weight. When it gets unreasonable, then I will point it out.

Arch Lich Thoth-Amon
05-06-2009, 04:09 PM
I'm with Farcaster on this one. I only loosely enforce it.

mnemenoi
05-06-2009, 04:38 PM
I concur, as long as they do not become a slow moving Wal-Mart I generally let it go with just their own gear.

LastGunslinger
05-06-2009, 04:46 PM
Yes. I'm a funwrecker. I am a Nazi about encumberance. Ask anyone who has had the displeasure of finding an entire cavern of jewels in one of my games.
The only thing i'm lenient on is ammunition.

Sascha
05-06-2009, 05:01 PM
I don't require players to track stuff I myself don't care enough about - be it encumbrance, ammunition, rations, what have you.

As a player, can't remember the last time encumbrance came into play.

cplmac
05-06-2009, 05:42 PM
I usually watch but have only had to say anything perhaps a couple of times. Usually, the players have done a good job of keeping track of it themselves. I figure if they are doing the work, I am not going to stop them. Although, I think that they watch this just to make sure they don't suddenly get a surprise by being encumbered and not able to do certain things.

templeorder
05-06-2009, 06:18 PM
Loosely in all my DnD games, but almost every other system that supports it, i enforce it. My DnD groups were just after escape, and i left that behind as i got older, switched systems, and began to expect an element of gritty realism in my games. ENC makes everything a choice. Can that light fighter wear leather and carry a shield? Not its just a smo... gotta have strength do it really. Conversely, go ahead and wear heavy armor... shield - who needs it!? Wade into combat with some reduced actions but its soooo worth it. Good ENC systems reduce not just movement, but actions... not just as a penalty, but as in reduced attack/defense capability. I prefer this sort of realism. Keeping track of arrows? You bet... make the character think more about wasting them. I don't like forgotten Realms type worlds where +3 swords are just lying on the ground everywhere and everything is bloody cheap... the barrier to entry should be about cost and usability... not just cost..
<pet peeve />

Kalanth
05-06-2009, 07:49 PM
In short, I am about as likely to enforce the encumbrance rules as I am to remember to tell the players to eat and drink there rations. It's a pretty much forgotten section of D&D as a result.

Grimwell
05-07-2009, 01:19 AM
I'd prefer to track these details, part of the fun for me is surviving on what you can bring along as a character. In my games I'm very liberal about it though; because most people I've met just don't want to worry about being two pounds overweight on what they carry. Basically, encumbrance can slow the fun for a lot of people, so I don't stress it.

Same with food. I think that woodsy characters would want to prove they c an do it in the wilds; but I don't force them.

Beaumont Sebos
05-07-2009, 09:10 AM
I never did until I started playing 3.5. I think they make the encumberance rules pretty simple and it hasn't been too much of a "burden" to figure it in the game.

I think it promotes good play to have players make decisions about what to carry and what to leave behind. Especially when it comes to movement and such.

Oldgamer
05-07-2009, 11:17 AM
All of my games at present are online, and almost all of them are on Mythweavers who have "smart" character sheets that figure your encumbrance for you, so the mechanical aspect is taken out. I have also used other smart sheets that do the same for tabletop games on a laptop.

But if it were the old days of true Pencil and Paper, the thought of keeping up with an accurate equipment list with their relative weights would seem to slow the game down a little, unless you were to wait in between encounters/events to kind of flesh out your sheets while everyone takes a mountain dew/pee break seems viable.

How does everyone weigh in on the issue of easing encumbrance tracking using technology over P&P? Obviously it makes it easier, but not everyone likes to see a laptop at their D&D tables, others I've seen, the table is covered by laptops with little to no paper (where's the fun in that???).

Moritz
05-07-2009, 05:42 PM
I think the only time I really ever enforce encumbrance is on day one. When I'm approving character sheets and they have calculated the weight of items.

Generally the players kept up with their weight during the course of the game. I'm sure there were fudges, but eah. As long as they weren't carrying 5 tons and didn't have bags of holding, I really didn't bother.

Except for when they walked into an antimagic zone... their bags would belch out all the contents and then they'd have to gather it and carry it out.

drewshi
05-07-2009, 06:22 PM
As a kid playing the game, we used to be walking arsenals with a weapon or magic item for every occasion. It was like we all had Bags of Holding. Now, as an adult, I do enforce the rules, but I'm not crazed about it.

InvestFDC
05-07-2009, 10:03 PM
Down to the pound, with computers nowadays it is really no hassle at all.

Webhead
05-07-2009, 10:26 PM
...So in 3.x, I started cracking down on it for equipment, but I never gave much thought to money unless it got out of hand. They couldn't carry around 1000's of gold pieces (without the Handy Sacks of course), they'd either have to purchase gems or find a bank of some sort.

I only loosely enforce encumbrance, only to keep things from getting ridiculous.

I do recall one time though that our party fell into a strong river and the DM had us calculate encumbrance to apply appropriate penalties to our swim checks. It was then that we first discovered truly how many arrows the archer had written down that he was carrying (not contained in magical quivers or bags). We quickly realized that the mass and volume of all his arrows would have actually exceeded that of his own character. We all got this image of a haystack of arrows with two protruding elf ears, bound around the middle with twine bobbing up and down like a cork as he was swept downriver. Seriously, the guy claimed that his character was somehow sporting over 300 ready-to-draw arrows.

Baron_Samedi
05-08-2009, 02:27 AM
Generally for individuals no. Its sort of an honour system thing...however i will say that if the party is travelling a great distance, they do make a habit of having a cart pulled by some beast of burden, in which case their is an appointed quartermaster...that falls to the players, i have no control over that.

Sethannon
05-08-2009, 08:37 AM
I only loosely do, and even then it's usually only if someone is trying to carry all their stuff and another person (plus their gear!) or something.

I find that as a general whole, my players focus on it more than I do, which works out for me. I figure if they want to do the work on that end for me, why let them know I don't normally care!

Windstar
05-08-2009, 10:17 AM
I would like to say that I also "loosely" enforce it, but I do more than that, but I am not a nazi about it either. I expect them to keep it under control or well you know things happen.

:cool::cool:

kirksmithicus
05-10-2009, 01:02 AM
Do you, as a DM, enforce Encumbrance? If so, do you include the weight of money such as coins and gems?

In 1st Ed AD&D, we never did. I saw on another thread on here someone posted about losing their primary weapon (A +5 sword) and went looking through several pages of equipment and found another, stating they had been collecting and carrying equipment for an entire career. We also did this, we never gave it thought that you would require several wagons and teams of horses to haul that stuff around :lol:

So in 3.x, I started cracking down on it for equipment, but I never gave much thought to money unless it got out of hand. They couldn't carry around 1000's of gold pieces (without the Handy Sacks of course), they'd either have to purchase gems or find a bank of some sort.

Hehe, my story. It was an eye opener for me. As a player I kept track of such things myself. I learned that not everyone does. I don't enforce it or keep track of it most of the time, the players should do that. It also depends on the game too. Some games are more....anal about such things.

Talmek
05-10-2009, 07:56 PM
I never really enforced encumberance in my games, primarily because my players were good about taking care of it themselves. I agree with Beaumont, 3.5e did make it pretty easy to calculate encumberance, but again I was more concerned with plot lines, BBEGs, etc.

tesral
05-11-2009, 12:30 AM
Not usually. Now if it is obvious they are trying to carry an elephant I am going to say something.

Usually such fiddly rules as encumbrance are used as punishers. I'm a "yes" GM. So I don't tend to worry about it..

nijineko
05-13-2009, 05:06 PM
i like being a yes-dm as well. however, my easy-going-ness about rules like encumbrance is inversely proportional to the abuse thereof.

Baldwin Stonewood
06-13-2009, 03:09 PM
I really like using the encumbrance rules. I don't harp on it all the time, as a DM, but I do periodically check on everyone's weight. Especially, if they are near water (which can be frequent in a seabased game) or if they are a smallish type character (like a halfling rogue). I also, will have characters tell me location of goods on their body for their access. Haversacks and BoH are very handy in my campaigns - well, worth the investment!

With the computer programs now, its pretty easy to get the general load characters are carrying.

korhal23
06-13-2009, 04:32 PM
For me, it depends on the game. For D&D, I don't usually care much about encumbrance, and it rarely comes up unless the players are talking about stripping everything of value out of the dungeon or castle or whatever they were just in. I rarely track ammo in it either.

But if we switch games... A game like Spycraft has no need to loot much of anything, and therefore encumbrance tends to only come up for feats of strength such as pushing or moving something heavy. In Spycraft I'm only a stickler for ammo.

In a simulation type game, like Aces and Eights, or Aftermath! though, you'd better believe encumbrance, and ammo counts, and food rations are immensely important and I don't skip them. Sure it requires some math, but it's actually really simple if you just know how much you have, how much you can carry, and update it EVERY time you pick up something of any significant weight, or drop or leave behind something of significance.

Baldwin Stonewood
06-13-2009, 04:37 PM
In a simulation type game, like Aces and Eights, or Aftermath! though, you'd better believe encumbrance, and ammo counts, and food rations are immensely important and I don't skip them. Sure it requires some math, but it's actually really simple if you just know how much you have, how much you can carry, and update it EVERY time you pick up something of any significant weight, or drop or leave behind something of significance.

i like to do the food and water on occasion. This certainly can become a factor in the roleplaying part of the game. Thirsty, hungary and encumbered characters provides a little realism.

korhal23
06-13-2009, 04:51 PM
i like to do the food and water on occasion. This certainly can become a factor in the roleplaying part of the game. Thirsty, hungary and encumbered characters provides a little realism.

I agree. Plus, Aftermath! is a post-apocalyptic game so every meal is a blessing and Aces and Eights being an Old West game food and water or lack thereof can be a huge difference. Both of these games also have extremely detailed and nuanced rules for combat, so knowing how many bullets are left in your gun is vital.

Baldwin Stonewood
06-13-2009, 05:37 PM
I agree. Plus, Aftermath! is a post-apocalyptic game so every meal is a blessing and Aces and Eights being an Old West game food and water or lack thereof can be a huge difference. Both of these games also have extremely detailed and nuanced rules for combat, so knowing how many bullets are left in your gun is vital.

I haven't played either Aftermath or Aces and eights but in reading some of your posts, I am interested in both games. I actually sent you a message about aces and eights. That game looks awesome. A friend of mine wants to to run wild west themed game - I emailed him the aces and eights link.

Arkhemedes
06-13-2009, 06:05 PM
I figure out encumbrance at the start of a character's career and pretty much don't worry about it too much after that unless the character is fairly weak or there is a drastic change in equipment. With coins and gems (at 1 pound per 50 coins) I only pay attention to it if it gets excessive. My players are constantly exchanging their coins into gems (since they can be so much lighter and I don't bother much with exchange rates, which for me is much more of a bother than encumbrance). I am a stickler for ammo however since it is sometimes magical. Food and water on the other hand is a time-waster, much like paying for daily expenses which I simply average out once per game month and subtract it from the PC's wealth. This is unless the characters are in an environment, or campaign as above, where food and water is scarce. I once ran an adventure that took the PCs on a long trip through a desert and food, water, encumbrance and heat where all major factors to be considered there. The desert simply would have lost much of its harshness if it had been otherwise.

emblasochist
06-15-2009, 01:32 PM
What I do is I act as though coins and items that are purely used as money is being put into a specialized bag of infinite holding that only can hold items that are used for money. I just think that the weight of money shouldn't hinder you from doing things. If it fit into fantasy worlds, I'd just as quickly tell my players that money is on credit cards or something similar. However, I am an ******* about encumbrance once a player wants to pick up a ton of garbage. Pick up the meaningful stuff; the food and water, the money or monetary treasures, the magic items. Don't pick up clubs because you can and it'd be something you can sell. So, if they want to pick up a lot of silly stuff, hell yes. If they are being sensible, they don't get penalized by it. If they are being really light with the things they are carrying, they can gain bonuses to the checks that are impacted by burden. But since I enforce my players eating and drinking their rations, they have to have some encumbrance.

Actually, if anyone is doing something really excessively, I punish them. I have a PC doppleganger rogue that likes to change his shape whenever he meets someone and he wants to steal anything that isn't nailed down. It grates on my nerves that he acts like that, so when he rolled really low on a thievery check, the first of the game, after trying to steal from everyone he met so far, I broke his thieves tools.

Stabbity
06-15-2009, 02:30 PM
I really like using the encumbrance rules. I don't harp on it all the time, as a DM, but I do periodically check on everyone's weight. Especially, if they are near water (which can be frequent in a seabased game) or if they are a smallish type character (like a halfling rogue). I also, will have characters tell me location of goods on their body for their access. Haversacks and BoH are very handy in my campaigns - well, worth the investment!

With the computer programs now, its pretty easy to get the general load characters are carrying.

I can atest to this Im (the halfling rouge) basicly having to pay one of the fighters to carry my stuff so I can even move.

In another game Im in its a darksun game and the dm there keeps track of water.

SilenzZzz
06-15-2009, 02:37 PM
i casually do it ... for items that players are looting but not using ... i normally get them to setup a 'safe room' in the dungeon to leave those items ... to retrieve later on ... and it is also a room for them to come back to for an extended rest .. (with some rogue traps and maybe a false wall after the entrance etc etc) ...

that also leads to an extra adventure or two if they don't quite get a level ... as they return to their cache they find that it has been broken into and there are footprints leading off in one direction ...

Baldwin Stonewood
06-15-2009, 03:59 PM
I do permit bills of credit in exchange for coin. There is a small money monger fee but this is essentially a non-issue once the characters start gathering loot.
I play in a game that has the same concept too.

emblasochist
06-16-2009, 08:36 AM
I like the idea of a letter of credit so that players do not have to lug around coins all day long that eat into their encumbrance, but I don't much like the idea of the money mongering fees. I understand that it is a valuable service, but you already are trusting your money to a person you MAY know, but players in worlds that are unfamiliar to them would have a problem storing their money with a person other than say a housekeeper for their armory. I know my players wouldn't go for that idea because their characters are not really trusting types and a couple are genuinely untrustworthy, being rogues. They would probably only want to carry the gold they NEEDED for whatever they wanted to buy and leave the rest in a safe spot only they can access. As such, I give my players a bag of infinite holding that is good for coins and monetary gems only. It keeps the concern of holding one's money off the player's minds and unless there is a story point where it becomes necessary for them to do elsewise, I will continue to do as I am.

Moritz
06-16-2009, 08:41 AM
"Here's your complimentary Bag-o-Holding. Now go enjoy your adventure..."

emblasochist
06-16-2009, 09:00 AM
"Here's your complimentary Bag-o-Holding. Now go enjoy your adventure..."

Like I mentioned before, its solely for money. I haven't given much thought honestly to other ways to overcome this issue, but it DOES solve the problem and nobody's complained about it logically. I'm not sure that they actually realize that their gold DOES have a weight, but that is a separate issue. Another idea I had was to have The Luggage from Discworld follow the party and carry their gold, but that has the same problem of explaining why it only holds money, and The Luggage was a badass mofo in combat. It'd be a bit more complicated to explain that one than their complimentary BoH.

Arkhemedes
06-16-2009, 09:42 AM
I like the idea of a letter of credit so that players do not have to lug around coins all day long that eat into their encumbrance, but I don't much like the idea of the money mongering fees. I understand that it is a valuable service, but you already are trusting your money to a person you MAY know, but players in worlds that are unfamiliar to them would have a problem storing their money with a person other than say a housekeeper for their armory. I know my players wouldn't go for that idea because their characters are not really trusting types and a couple are genuinely untrustworthy, being rogues. They would probably only want to carry the gold they NEEDED for whatever they wanted to buy and leave the rest in a safe spot only they can access. As such, I give my players a bag of infinite holding that is good for coins and monetary gems only. It keeps the concern of holding one's money off the player's minds and unless there is a story point where it becomes necessary for them to do elsewise, I will continue to do as I am.
How do you keep your players from abusing this bag of holding without saying,"because the GM says so?"

emblasochist
06-16-2009, 02:00 PM
How do you keep your players from abusing this bag of holding without saying,"because the GM says so?"

I assume you mean aside from a swift kick in the shins?

Arkhemedes
06-16-2009, 02:20 PM
I assume you mean aside from a swift kick in the shins?
Apparently your players are willing to fold under such tactics. Mine on the other hand...lol.

emblasochist
06-16-2009, 02:22 PM
I can be, how do you say, "persuasive".

Tamerath
06-16-2009, 05:28 PM
I think the character builder tracks it already...but no...I'm not a DM that really watches his PC's character sheets that close...I'm the same way about food and water...unless it's in a place where that stuff would matter (like a dungeon that doesn't have a supply of food handy or clean water...and you are going to be there for several weeks)

tesral
06-16-2009, 07:29 PM
Encumbrance is as easily handled as catching an elephant.

emblasochist
06-16-2009, 08:02 PM
You do realize that there are ways of even making that easy, yes?

tesral
06-16-2009, 08:55 PM
Sure you only need three things. A telescope a matchbox and a tweezer.

Look though the big end of the telescope, pick up the elephant with the tweezer and put him in the matchbox.

D&D characters can pack their bags that way.

emblasochist
06-16-2009, 09:09 PM
Sure you only need three things. A telescope a matchbox and a tweezer.

Look though the big end of the telescope, pick up the elephant with the tweezer and put him in the matchbox.

D&D characters can pack their bags the way way.

What do you mean by the way way?

templeorder
06-16-2009, 09:41 PM
I always use it, but i really only track weapons, armor and bigger items. Packs get dropped, and booty can be gotten later when all is said and done.

But yes, it should be noted that there are always ways to make it easier. I ignore quite a bit of items, as it woudll slow things down. I wrote, for my own game system, a recommendation on the table top platform and that you should specifically IGNORE it except armor, shields, and weapons. It definitely a job for a computer...

tesral
06-17-2009, 09:59 AM
What do you mean by the way way?

Me no can type. I meant "Pack their bags that way."

emblasochist
06-17-2009, 11:35 AM
I'm not sure, but does the character builder from the D&D Insider actually include money in encumbrance?

And just for the sake of discussion if my players were to pack an elephant into their packs by the make them small with a telescope way, it'd be a tiny elephant that FITS in their packs, but weighs inversely proportional to the change in size... Or the elephant just resizes before being put anywhere. I'm not sure which would be funnier; trying to pick up an elephant the size of a dustball that weighs several thousand tons, or being crushed by an elephant that falls on you when you try to put it in a bag.

DarQuing
06-17-2009, 11:40 AM
In 3.5E I wasn't a stickler for the small stuff (ammo, coins, gems, etc), but I don't see them carrying more than one other suit of armor (especially halfplate or fullplate) or more than half-a-dozen weapons (wooden weapons count for half a weapon). 4E doesn't have encumbrance rules, but I think I'd rule the same way.

Arkhemedes
06-17-2009, 12:29 PM
Question: How do you know when an elephant has been in you backpack?

Answer: By the footprints in the cheese cake.

(Yeah, I had the Book of 101 Elephant Jokes too).

emblasochist
06-17-2009, 12:59 PM
That one is a bit funny. Worth a chuckle.

Arkhemedes
06-17-2009, 02:11 PM
Yeah, according to my count there are at least 99 more. But perhaps we're getting off subject here. Maybe Tesral and I should start another thread on this subject.

emblasochist
06-17-2009, 02:15 PM
Not really. Putting an elephant in your adventurer's pack would cause an encumbrance.

spotlight
06-17-2009, 02:38 PM
I use encumberance rules only when the players start getting goofy. As for oliphants in a backpack, no problem, IF one remembers to pack a chairopracter as well.:lol:

tesral
06-17-2009, 02:58 PM
Yeah, according to my count there are at least 99 more. But perhaps we're getting off subject here. Maybe Tesral and I should start another thread on this subject.

Let's not and say we didn't.



Not really. Putting an elephant in your adventurer's pack would cause an encumbrance.

About the point I start to worry about encumbrance, and that was more or less the point I was dancing in the general vicinity of.


I use encumbrance rules only when the players start getting goofy. As for oliphants in a backpack, no problem, IF one remembers to pack a chiropractor as well.:lol:

Wouldn't that just add to the load?

Arkhemedes
06-17-2009, 04:00 PM
[quote=tesral]Let's not and say we didn't.

Eh, your no fun anymore. But it's just as well I suppose. I lost the book and I only remember about a dozen or so anyway.

emblasochist
06-17-2009, 05:08 PM
Wouldn't that just add to the load?

There are some encumbrances that are worth it. One does not simply was walk into Mordor, nor does one forgo the use of their enchanted armor when fighting against the daemon princes.

Valdar
06-17-2009, 06:11 PM
I'm not sure, but does the character builder from the D&D Insider actually include money in encumbrance?


It does indeed.

tesral
06-18-2009, 11:57 AM
There are some encumbrances that are worth it. One does not simply was walk into Mordor, nor does one forgo the use of their enchanted armor when fighting against the daemon princes.


http://api.ning.com/files/thJ236gDjZ9rJ1qkbmP7vS2PMC36MMjqwTwJknQzN58_/rockintomordor.jpg

Arkhemedes
06-18-2009, 12:15 PM
Hysterical dude! Freakin' hysterical!

emblasochist
06-18-2009, 03:31 PM
Yeah, that's true too...

TaliesinNYC
03-31-2010, 10:24 AM
I don't micromanage my players. The premise being, you're all adults, so keep things reasonable.

People tend to take me at my word. I haven't had any problems -- I suppose I could be stricter but that would distract me from focusing on more important things, like, you know, having fun.

tesral
03-31-2010, 11:13 AM
Ral Partha had a mini called the Complete Adventurer. A big beefy dude that had everything packed on him, including at the very top a kitchen sink. The mini was a tour de force of carving, the pack, nearly the size of the guy cvarrying it had all sorts of little details. When they start to look like this, I enforce encumbrence.

A picture is worth a thousand words

24682469

TheYeti1775
04-01-2010, 02:30 PM
Only in the slightest since do I enforce encumberance. If it's obiviousily too much I'll say something.
Ammo, most of the characters have Craft(arrow/bolt), so we hand wave a lot of it with they spend time each night replenishing their supplies.
Coin Encumberance. The rarest of enforcements. Like was said the Coin Purse of Holding is a necessary evil at times. Though we do have Letters of Credit, Trade Bars, Trade Gems, and items of that nature. Also one of my friends worlds had the Ali Merchant family. Using Ring Gates, you could get anything throughout the world from them. Think of Aurora's Whole Realms Wal-Mart style. Sometimes it took time. But Letters of Credit through them were as good as gold.

rabkala
04-04-2010, 04:49 PM
I don't micromanage my players. The premise being, you're all adults, so keep things reasonable.

People tend to take me at my word. I haven't had any problems -- I suppose I could be stricter but that would distract me from focusing on more important things, like, you know, having fun.

Well said! In 30 years I have never really had to try. If things do seem to be getting over the top, I will remind a player to watch the rules. In one game we had a DM who was insanely anal on accounting and the letter of the law, which completely distracted from the flow of the game.

templeorder
04-05-2010, 08:09 AM
I'll have to clarify here. There are ENC rules. They are simple. I break my own rules all the time though and never track anything but the big stuff - armor, weapons, and an average weight for a 'pack' of whatever is appropriate to the setting. I don't do munitions - though you can only carry so much. I dont track found items - but you cannot carry rooms full of goods. I never count whats being held as characters can actively balance this to reduce its ENC value. I use it to inject fun and leave off where it over-burdens... ENC systems are not always throw-away parts of a game, they can be used to heighten tension when the characters make choices. Less actions in a fight, less speed in running away, etc. But i have to say, if you can afford it, good armor, screens and shields are worth every single penny/credit.

---------- Post added at 06:09 AM ---------- Previous post was at 06:07 AM ----------


Ral Partha had a mini called the Complete Adventurer. A big beefy dude that had everything packed on him, including at the very top a kitchen sink. The mini was a tour de force of carving, the pack, nearly the size of the guy cvarrying it had all sorts of little details. When they start to look like this, I enforce encumbrence.

A picture is worth a thousand words

24682469

Where's the ten foot pole!??

tesral
04-05-2010, 11:37 AM
Folded. Good adventurers buy the Acme folding eleven foot pole. He has two of them.

wbrandel
04-05-2010, 12:45 PM
Although I am not an encumbrance nazi, I do somewhat enforce encumbrance rules. What I will do is a spot check (read honesty check) on the players ever so often and if something strikes me as odd I will ask about it. This check also lets me get familiar with each character so I can plan my adventures better. However with ammunition my players will probably say that I am an ammo nazi. The reason for this is that I love the look on the players face when he/she realizes that they are out of ammo.

cplmac
04-08-2010, 12:06 PM
Folded. Good adventurers buy the Acme folding eleven foot pole. He has two of them.


Yes, but they are rather expensive. At least I didn't have to pay for shipping on mine.

scars_of_carma
04-19-2010, 07:19 PM
I do enforce encumbrance. I think logistics should be a challenge in its own right. Dungeons and Dragons is not Final Fantasy or World of Warcraft where the mania of "collecting things" is just ridiculous. You need to be smart about what you take with you and you don't get around that by just taking everything. Bags of Holding are available for adventurers who insist on being a loner, but I don't see the problem with just using a torch-bearer and a pack-animal most of the time. Lends to more interesting roleplaying encounters...

templeorder
04-20-2010, 08:54 AM
How does everyone weigh in on the issue of easing encumbrance tracking using technology over P&P? Obviously it makes it easier, but not everyone likes to see a laptop at their D&D tables, others I've seen, the table is covered by laptops with little to no paper (where's the fun in that???).

I think its fine. I only allow 1 laptop for the players at the table for looking things up or whatever reason - otherwise print it out. And, i only track major equipment (arms, armor, avg. pack) so the record keeping is minimized. I rarely make the games much about loads of treasure anyway. Typically the players will start and finish with roughly the same equipment and load. Looting on such a level to make a difference is saved until afterward when you can bring in bearers and pack animals. Or, its something done on the way out of some place, where pursuit, traps, and the like have already been mostly taken care of.

cplmac
04-21-2010, 10:28 AM
In my game, the party has a large wagon that allows them to be able to carry lots of stuff without any of the actual characters being weighed down by a ton of gear. Having the wagon also allows them to have a good amount of feed for all the horses when they first start out from town. As the days go by, supplies get used and makes for room that the "treasure" that they find has a place to be stored. I do however keep track of what they have in the wagon. When the party had found its way to the inner part of the Lost Caverns, they had left treasure sitting at places along the way to be collected on the way back out. What they weren't expecting was that everything that had been taken back to the wagon when they were closer to it turned up missing, to include the wagon and all of thier horses. Hey it takes time to find your way through two levels of unmapped caverns.