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Dammerung
04-21-2009, 11:01 PM
:confused:Hey just a quick question about broken teeth and such. Urie the ranger got himself punched in the mouth by a monk... If that wasnt bad enough it dislodged one of his teeth. In D&D 3.5 (Pathfinder setting) how would one go about fixing a broken tooth? 3rd lvl character so restoration is a bit out of reach.
Thanks for you help
Dammerung

kirksmithicus
04-21-2009, 11:47 PM
The old fashion way. Buy some whiskey, get drunk, then have a friend pry it out with a knife or something.

Arch Lich Thoth-Amon
04-22-2009, 12:03 AM
Yep. Thats about right. Of course, the doctors(term used very loosely) of the times did have something resembling pliers. Kind of like a blacksmithing tool, only much smaller.

Lucian-Sunaka
04-22-2009, 12:56 AM
Theoretically, wouldn't it be simple enough to just re-position it where it should be, then cast a simple cure spell and wouldn't the flesh heal around it to secure the tooth as it should be?

(Granted this is speculation and up to GM decision, but I'd allow it.)

Dammerung
04-22-2009, 01:21 AM
Im hoping so, The game isnt until sunday but I want to have a plan to get the tooth back in. He has the tooth in his possession and the healer should be coming around soon (He was nearly killed in the fight as well). Hopefully we won't be hearing too many more tales of the toothless ranger... Who ever thought 9 points of damage could cause so much trouble?
BTW thanks for the replys!
Dammerung

Lucian-Sunaka
04-22-2009, 11:32 AM
Really the 'trouble' is all dependent on the DM lol, I've never hurt a players face before unless they were being extremely obnoxious with the whole charisma = beauty theory. Knock a few teeth out and mess up their nose... "But... but... I have a high charisma, how does that work!?" "Simple kid, like I told you before, charisma's your force of personality and ability to influence people, you can be butt ugly and still have a high cha."

In my case though, I tend to be a rather bloody GM, my players get stabbed, run through, sliced open. By the time my players get to higher levels where weapons become less relevant, 90% of my PC's have MANY scars lol.

Good luck with the tooth, a successful heal check for placement before the spell might be helpful.

Arch Lich Thoth-Amon
04-22-2009, 12:00 PM
Since the 1970's, while playing dnd, i require everyone to write down all the significant scarring they have. These i can use as identification marks for the local law. Seems logical since many of my players operate below the radar.

Dammerung
04-22-2009, 09:12 PM
Yea the GM im playing with is is a good guy, My character only has a CHA 10 and I play him as the gruff ex mercenary. It was a situational affect really (As you round the corner you see the monk (Who was hiding) just as he trys to punch at your face... Nat 20... confirmed, only 9 damage. Still he knocks a tooth out...) I got my revenge by pinning him to the wall with rapid shot right after a witty responce... it was a good cinematic. Still it helps to know a good heal spell should do the trick by most peoples account.
Thanks again!
Dammerung

tesral
04-24-2009, 12:57 AM
Theoretically, wouldn't it be simple enough to just re-position it where it should be, then cast a simple cure spell and wouldn't the flesh heal around it to secure the tooth as it should be?

(Granted this is speculation and up to GM decision, but I'd allow it.)

About what I would do. I seldom get into the exact nature of your wounds and as long as they are magically healed they do not scar.

Loose tooth? A healing spell would put it back as long as it was reseated before any healing. It's not like a limb was chopped off. A touch of sovereign glue on a broken tooth would fix it.

Oh the device that is being talking about is a "dental key (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dental_key)" A tool that gave the "dentist" some leverage in removing a diseased tooth. About the only cure for any dental problem prior to the 20th century.



Since the 1970's, while playing dnd, i require everyone to write down all the significant scarring they have. These i can use as identification marks for the local law. Seems logical since many of my players operate below the radar.

I again do not get much into scaring. As long as magic is used for the healing.

That is something to think about in the current setting. A Steampunk style setting with much less healing available to the common people. Scaring would be more common.

nijineko
04-24-2009, 01:27 AM
or even a culture that valued scars for reasons of bravery or honor or somesuch, might have curative magic that results in the maximum possible scar tissue, while getting the nasty bits of healing and injury over with faster so that warriors can get back into the fray more quickly....

tesral
04-24-2009, 01:30 AM
or even a culture that valued scars for reasons of bravery or honor or somesuch, might have curative magic that results in the maximum possible scar tissue, while getting the nasty bits of healing and injury over with faster so that warriors can get back into the fray more quickly....

The appearance without the harmful effects of scaring.

nijineko
04-25-2009, 09:59 PM
well, i sure wouldn't want my range of motion restricted because of an unfortunately placed scar....

Lucian-Sunaka
04-25-2009, 10:12 PM
Yeah... about that Neko.... I never applied any lasting effect from the scars aside from their appearance, and occasionally slight difficulty (only minor rp flavor pain and no inability) when moving certain directions.